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Surveillance vs. supervision: Understanding the difference
K-12TechDecisions
Video surveillance is becoming ubiquitous, simply a fact of life in modern society, and our K-12 schools are no exception. However, there is an issue with cameras in schools, and it's not the one George Orwell warned us about. In many cases, video surveillance systems are being purchased by K-12 campuses with the intent of replacing student supervision personnel.
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Why some parents are sitting kids out of tests
NPR
Meet Jenni Hofschulte, the 35-year-old mom who's one of the parents leading the charge against testing in Milwaukee. "I have two children in Milwaukee Public Schools," Hofschulte says over coffee at a cafe near her home. "The oldest one is in eighth grade." She's interrupted by her fidgety 4-year-old son, Lachlan. Hofschulte quiets him down, furrows her brow and begins again. Hofschulte says that when she found out her son would have to take a diagnostic test next year that's required of all Wisconsin kindergartners, all kinds of red flags went up.
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What educators need to know about the 'cloud' in K-12
Education World
Options to stay in the "cloud" at schools are slowly but surely making their way across institutions all over the country. IT professionals are in the best place to have insights and expert have the knowledge about how cloud-based computing can be useful or potentially dangerous for the K-12 environment. "Here's the thing, though: While IT professionals may be well-versed in the world of 'cloud,' a lot of parents, teachers and district leaders are still trying to wrap their heads around the tech-age concept," says Allie Gross of EducationDive.
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A new recipe for digital, mobile learning
eClassroom News
The Consortium for School Networking on March 6 unveiled two new resources for education leaders to take the digital leap in their schools. Launched through the organization's Leadership for Mobile Learning initiative, CoSN has developed "A Recipe for Success" video guide and a "What is Digital Transformation" graphic that capture the most surprising and counter-intuitive lessons of best practices in school district leadership.
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Why isn't sex education a part of Common Core?
Pacific Standard
According to a recent PublicMind poll from Fairleigh Dickinson University, 44 percent of Americans believe that sex education is part of the Common Core curriculum. It’s not. The Common Core—national standards aimed at creating better-educated high school graduates—actually covers only mathematics and “language arts,” or what we used to call English. But why doesn’t the Common Core have a sex ed component? After graduation, more of us are likely to go on to have sex than to engage in algebraic equations or close readings of poetry.
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Slowdown expected in K-12 mobile device growth for 2015
THE Journal
The market for mobile computing devices in K-12 worldwide has grown by 18 percent, according to new analysis by Futuresource Consulting. That equates to 5.7 million devices being shipped in the fourth quarter of 2014. But that growth pales in comparison to numbers in the U.S., where the market grew by 40.5 percent in 2014, driven, according to the research firm, by Common Core and the broad adoption of online assessments.
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How to make elementary teachers stronger in STEM
eSchool News
Despite renewed interest, calls for funding and presidential appeals, true STEM integration is missing from a large number of classrooms across the country. And to hear Patty Born-Selly tell it that's especially true at the elementary level. "Most elementary teachers when they are placed in the classroom often just don't feel comfortable teaching STEM subjects," said Born-Selly, who is the executive director of the National Center for STEM Elementary Education, an organization embedded within Minnesota's St. Catherine's University, colloquially known as St. Kate's.
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Standards: Why realizing the full promise of education requires a fresh approach
MindShift
Education is not "omnipotent," says Yong Zhao, education professor at the University of Oregon, but it can change the trajectory of people's lives. Most recent education policies, such as No Child Left Behind and Common Core, have sought to better realize this potential by aiming for parity in outcomes, as indicated by standardized test scores. Proponents, including many civil rights groups, see such initiatives as a way to shine a light on inequality in education and pressure schools to help disadvantaged students graduate with the same knowledge and skills as their more advantaged peers, with the goal of better preparing them for colleges and careers.
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High schools and middle schools are failing victims of sexual assault
U.S News & World Report
Daisy Coleman switched high schools after allegations that another student had raped her sparked outrage and national headlines. Still, the 17-year-old's struggle to live a normal life was made even harder recently, when her new principal told her she could not attend prom because, according to Coleman's mother, the school couldn't guarantee that she wouldn't be harassed there. “Because he can't protect her, he is going to punish her more,” Melinda Coleman, Daisy’s mother, said at a press conference.
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New Hampshire sets the PACE with new accountability strategy
By Brian Stack
To test or not to test? That seems to be the question these days when it comes to state-run standardized testing that is used to hold schools, teachers and students accountable. Most educators agree that this accountability is necessary, but when faced with countless hours of lost instructional time to administer tests, many are left to wonder whether the overtesting should continue. In New Hampshire, the question was never whether or not to take a standardized test. Rather, the Granite State set out to build a better mousetrap.
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Teachers more influential than ever in choosing classroom tech
K-12TechDecisions
The ed-tech buying process in K-12 districts is more decentralized than it once was. In some ways, the division of power is changing and this has very real implications for how technology companies create and market their products. While CIOs and technology managers continue to make decisions about core technology like infrastructure broadband and hardware, teachers and school level employees are more involved than ever in choosing student-facing technology — and those are the tools that tend to have the biggest potential to create positive learning outcomes.
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How to get kids to read independently
The Washington Post
The Scholastic Kids & Family Reading Report™: Fifth Edition is out and offers a snapshot of where young people are when it comes to reading independently. Here are some of the findings of a nationally representative survey conducted last fall by Scholastic in conjunction with YouGov. Some of the results are surprising, including the fact that kids prefer to read books in print.
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Blended learning: How the nation's capital is reinventing its classrooms for the future
District Administration Magazine
When the District of Columbia Public Schools' Chancellor Kaya Henderson announced in 2012 the launch of an ambitious plan to transform our schools, we were all very excited, albeit a little nervous. But the plan to invest in struggling schools, and focus significant resources and attention to raise proficiency rates across the district, made our marching orders clear. Every office, in every building, in every school and administrative team now worked toward the same, very specific five goals outlined in the Chancellor's five-year strategic plan called, "A Capital Commitment."
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Sen. Casey introduces bill to reduce school suspensions
The Huffington Post
As members of the Senate hurried out of town ahead of a major snowstorm, Sen. Bob Casey, D-Penn., quietly introduced a bill that could help keep tens of thousands of young people in the classroom and out of the juvenile justice system. The Keep Kids in School Act, introduced recently, aims to reduce the number of kids suspended from U.S. schools each year by encouraging school districts to collect detailed information about disciplinary practices and by providing additional resources to school systems struggling with high suspension rates.
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USDA allocates $5.5 million to help schools serve healthier lunches
The Hill
The U.S. Department of Agriculture is giving schools $5.5 million in training grants, in addition to the $25 million being allocated this year for new kitchen equipment, to help districts prepare healthier meals. "Our kids today are growing up in a very competitive economy and in this competitive economy it's going to be very important for them and their country to be on top of their game," Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack said recently.
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Delegation rejects guns in Baltimore schools for police
Baltimore Sun
Officers in the Baltimore school system's police force in Maryland won't be able to carry guns inside schools any time soon. The city's delegation in Annapolis effectively killed legislation that would have lifted the prohibition, putting an end to a contentious debate that divided the community. So for the time being, Baltimore's school police will remain the only police officers in the state forbidden to have firearms within public schools while classes are in session
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State education department unveils system to classify schools' performance
JournalStar.com
Nebraska Department of Education officials recently unveiled a system to classify each school at 1 of 4 levels — from "excellent" to "needing improvement" — based on test scores, how much struggling students improve and graduation rates. Education officials hope the accountability system, mandated by state law, will give ample credit to schools that improve performance of at-risk students, giving schools with high levels of low-income, non-English-speaking or special education students a fair shake.
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Florida debuts controversial tests
eSchool News
More students are expected to flunk. School districts warn they might not be ready. And parents are threatening to boycott. Ready or not — and many school boards, parents and teachers have been screaming to lawmakers that they're not — Florida rolled out its new, much debated standardized tests on March 2.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Dealing with Common Core backlash (District Administration Magazine)
The snow conundrum: How a school system decides whether to open (The Washington Post)
When school leaders empower teachers, better ideas emerge (MindShift)
Research: Active learning more important than flipping the classroom (THE Journal)
Motivation + trust = learning (By: Pamela Hill)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




Next on your reading list: Books from #naesp15 speakers
NAESP
What's next in education? Look to the 2015 NAESP Annual Conference — Best Practices for Better Schools — for fresh ideas and new strategies. The premiere event for elementary and middle-level principals will be June 30-July 2 in Long Beach, California. But what's next for your reading list? Let this handy directory of top books from 2015 conference speakers — some of the most innovative voices in education — be your guide. Just choose the profile that sounds like you.
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Last week to vote in the 2015 NAESP election
NAESP
Polls will be closing this Thursday, March 12 for the 2015 NAESP election, so make sure to visit the website to cast your vote. Eligible NAESP members may vote for the President-Elect and Vice President, and new Zone Directors will be elected in Zones 5, 7 and 9 in accordance with their zone process. If you have questions about your zone election, please contact your zone director. Members can learn about the candidates and find instructions on how to vote at www.naesp.org/2015-naesp-election.
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Before the Bell is a benefit of your membership in the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). For information about other member benefits, visit www.naesp.org or contact us at naesp@naesp.org.

Before the Bell is a digest of the most important news selected for NAESP from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The presence of such advertising does not endorse, or imply endorsement of, any products or services by NAESP. Neither NAESP nor Multiview is liable for the use of or reliance on any information contained in this briefing.

Feedback about an article? Contact NAESP Liaison Meredith Barnett at MBarnett@naesp.org.
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