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Moving
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Moving to
Success is a comprehensive, developmental elementary physical education curriculum guide.
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School maintenance report shows need for $542 billion to update, modernize buildings
The Associated Press via The Huffington Post
America's schools are in such disrepair that it would cost more than $270 billion just to get elementary and secondary buildings back to their original conditions and twice that to get them up to date, a report estimated. In a foreword to the report, former President Bill Clinton said "we are still struggling to provide equal opportunity" to children and urged the first federal study of school buildings in almost two decades. Clinton and the Center for Green Schools urged a Government Accountability Office assessment on what it would take to get school buildings up to date to help students learn, keep teachers healthy and put workers back on the jobs.
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Military schools grapple with budget cuts confusion, instability
The Huffington Post
When BettyLou Cummins became a teacher in defense department schools 34 years ago, she knew that her livelihood would depend on the federal government. "It's been said that Congress is our school board," said Cummins, who teaches at Ramstein High School on Ramstein Air Base in Germany and serves as a vice president of the Federal Education Association. But now, she said, that school board has failed her. "And the stress level is through the roof." Since Congress failed to prevent the implementation of across-the-board spending cuts known as sequestration, parents of students in defense department schools around the globe have heard all sorts of rumors regarding how the cuts will affect them.
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Survey suggests hurdles for math, science teaching
Education Week
A rich new set of survey data on math and science teachers highlights some big challenges the nation faces if it hopes to significantly increase student achievement in those disciplines. It also drives home, experts say, the huge need to support teachers as districts begin implementing the Common Core math standards, and as an effort to develop common standards for science nears completion. Just one-third of middle school math teachers have a degree in mathematics or math education, for instance, according to the national survey of nearly 7,800 educators, including elementary teachers as well as secondary math and science teachers, issued last month. Fewer than half of elementary teachers feel "very well prepared" to teach science. And just one in five K-3 educators teaches science every day.
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Building social and emotional skills in elementary students: Emotional management
Edutopia
What if your kids could learn that managing their emotions gives them a real advantage in school, in relationships and in life in general? Like ninja masters, they can train themselves to harness their inner resources and redirect their energy to successfully deal with the challenges that come their way. In this article we'll explore some approaches that can help.
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What's next for early childhood education in America?
Take Part
President Barack Obama is a believer in early childhood education. He often talked about it on the campaign trail in 2008 and 2012, and in his February State of the Union address, he said, "Tonight, I propose working with states to make high-quality preschool available to every child in America. Every dollar we invest in high-quality early education can save more than seven dollars later on by boosting graduation rates, reducing teen pregnancy, even reducing violent crime." The president has yet to lay out a concrete plan on how to achieve this goal, but his message resonated. Congress and state legislatures have jumped onto the early education bandwagon by introducing legislation. A series of bills in Washington and around the country are, fortunately, aimed at educating children before they hit elementary school.
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Helping education leaders grow
Education Week
It's time to dispel the perception that school principals have all the skills and capacity they need to be successful leaders as soon as they leave principal-preparation programs. Consider findings from the latest MetLife Survey of the American Teacher, a work that always seems to get to the heart of education's biggest questions. Responses to the recently released 29th annual survey offer interesting — and troubling — insights into school leadership.
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Controlling social media: Current policy trends in K-12 education
THE Journal
As school boards address the overall challenge of social media use within schools, they should focus on the reality that the impact no longer lies only on the individual and local schools. Social networks include students and teachers all over the world and, therefore, teaching and coaching on digital literacy for teachers and students is where the focus should rest. Knowing how to build successful communities of learning and how to integrate social connectivity within a learning environment is a much more needed outcome than finding a way to control and monitor specific users and content.
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Positive psychology in the classroom
Psychology Today
In too many schools, teachers deploy control mechanisms rather than motivational mechanisms. Children and adolescents are extrinsically conditioned to respond — they are not taught to intrinsically self-motivate. The behavioral strategies rely heavily on contingency management: reward, poorly understood negative reinforcement, and mostly, punishment. These approaches are more standardized than customized, easier to implement in groups, and dominate the educational culture. The behavioral approaches do not leverage the neuroscience research to help children understand and act on the complex emotional, cognitive and conative connections in their brains.
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For low-income kids, access to devices could be the equalizer
MindShift
No device should ever be hailed as the silver bullet in "saving" education — nor should it be completely shunned — but when it comes to the possibility of bridging the digital divide between low-income and high-income students, devices may play a pivotal role. Access to the Internet connects kids to all kinds of information — and for low-income students especially, that access has the power to change their social structure by allowing them to become empowered and engaged, said Michael Mills, a professor of Teaching and Learning at the University of Central Arkansas during a SXSWEdu session.
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When teachers are the bully's target
CNN
Several years ago, Brendesha Tynes was taken aback when she received an email from one of her former students. The note directed her to a Facebook event for an all-night bar crawl — an event with which Tynes, an assistant professor at the time, had nothing to do. But it featured an offensive image and listed Tynes as the host; another former student had set it up. As an educator and researcher, Tynes had spent years looking into cyberbullying. Now, she was a victim.
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Creating classrooms we need: 8 ways into inquiry learning
MindShift
If kids can access information from sources other than school, and if school is no longer the only place where information lives, what, then happens to the role of this institution? "Our whole reason for showing up for school has changed, but infrastructure has stayed behind," said Diana Laufenberg, who taught history at the progressive public school Science Leadership Academy for many years. Laufenberg provided some insight into how she guided students to find their own learning paths at school, and enumerated some of these ideas at SXSWEdu.
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From the principal's office: 10 things school leaders do to kill a teacher's enthusiasm for technology
Tech & Learning
Here's a list of 10 things a school leader does to kill any teacher's enthusiasm for using technology in their classrooms. An alternative title for this list might be, "10 Things a 21st Century School Leader Will Not Do to Discourage Teachers from Engaging in the Use of Technology."
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Study: Home-schoolers better rested than other students
USA Today
Home-schooled students may be better equipped to learn because they're getting a lot more sleep, a new study suggests. The first-of-its-kind national study of more than 2,600 adolescents, including about 500 home-taught kids, found that home-schooled students slept an average of 90 minutes more per night than students attending public or private schools. By the end of the week, that's almost an entire night's sleep traditional students are missing, says Lisa Meltzer, the study's lead author and an assistant professor of pediatrics at National Jewish Health in Denver.
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Helping education leaders grow
Education Week
It's time to dispel the perception that school principals have all the skills and capacity they need to be successful leaders as soon as they leave principal-preparation programs. Consider findings from the latest MetLife Survey of the American Teacher, a work that always seems to get to the heart of education's biggest questions

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Homework or not? That is the (research) question
District Administration Magazine
Woe unto the administrator who ventures forth into the homework wars. Scale it back, and parents will be at your door complaining about a lack of academic rigor. Dial it up, and you'll get an earful from other parents about interference with after-school activities and family time.

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Study: What makes a good teacher
The Washington Post
Even as most of the nation's 15,000 public school districts roll out new systems to evaluate teachers, many are still struggling with a central question: What's the best way to identify an effective educator? After a three-year, $45 million research project, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation believes it has some answers.

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Report: Kids need to step up physical activity
USA Today
Despite years of prodding from their parents, teachers and doctors, kids and teens still aren't doing nearly enough physical activity, and changes need to be made in schools to help kids step it up, says a report released by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. A recent government survey found that only 29 percent of high school students participated in 60 or more minutes a day of physical activity on each of the seven days prior to the survey.
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'Sequester' adds to districts' budget uncertainties
Education Week
Even as they seek to quantify the impact of across-the-board federal budget cuts on K-12 programs, some of the nation's neediest school districts are bracing for tough choices. The pinch from sequestration — or "the sequester," in Washington shorthand — is expected to be particularly painful for districts that depend the most on the federal government to supplement their bottom lines. They include districts serving high numbers of disadvantaged children, students in special education, and English learners, along with those near military bases and on Native American reservations.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Homework or not? That is the (research) question (District Administration Magazine)
Cuts imminent, Senate rejects stopgap efforts (The Associated Press via Google News)
School leaders brace for cuts as sequestration occurs (eSchool News)
Study: Childhood ADHD may lead to troubles later on (Reuters)
Handling teacher and student testing burnout (Edutopia)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


State and district NCLB waivers: Good news and bad news
THE Journal
When the No Child Left Behind Act became law in 2002, it provided large sums of money to states for education. The program also had very strict performance requirements, including a 2014 deadline for all students to be proficient in mathematics and language arts. During the past 10 years, concerns about NCLB requirements have mounted among educators, while reauthorization of the legislation has been awaiting congressional action since 2007.
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Secretary of Education Arne Duncan plays 'Not My Job'
NPR
Arne Duncan is President Barack Obama's secretary of education, and if, while he's on this show, a disaster befalls the president, the vice president, the speaker of the House and every other member of the Cabinet except Veterans Affairs and Homeland Security, he would be president. We've invited Duncan to play a game called "Now, don't be fresh ... I just take dictation!" Three questions for the secretary of education about the education of secretaries.
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Department of Education announces 11 states will receive funding to continue efforts to turn around their lowest-performing schools
U.S. Department of Education
U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan announced that 11 states will receive funding to continue efforts to turn around their persistently lowest achieving schools through the Department's School Improvement Grants program.
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10 lessons from the best district in the country
Scholastic Administrator
If they haven't been tossed already, textbooks at Mooresville Graded School District in North Carolina sit unused, piled in corners of classrooms. Desks are no longer neatly arranged in rows, and students rarely sit quietly and listen to extended lectures. At Mooresville, 20 miles outside of Charlotte, N.C., this is the new norm. The district undertook a massive "21st Century Digital Conversion" in 2007. Students now frequently work in groups, and they use one of dozens of interactive learning platforms instead of textbooks. Rather than lecturing, teachers act as facilitators, circulating among groups or leading students in interactive lessons.
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Suspending some standardized tests could save California $15 million
Los Angeles Times
A plan to suspend California's standardized testing for certain grades while new computerized exams are developed could save $15 million, the state's top education official said. State Supt. of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson recommended to the state Board of Education that the savings be used instead to develop higher-quality tests linked to new uniform but voluntary academic standards. They have been adopted by 45 states, including California, which plans to roll them out in the 2014-2015 school year. The new standards are aimed at fostering more critical thinking, sophisticated writing and other higher-level skills.
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The literacy crisis: Searching for solutions in Mississippi
The Hechinger Report
On a recent Friday morning in the gym at Gaston Point Elementary School in Gulfport, Miss., Tracy Jackson was growing impatient. It was the monthly awards assembly, a morning dedicated to recognizing students who were excelling in school, but several students were hesitant to get up and accept their awards. Jackson knew exactly why. "They don't want to be different," said the principal, who has worked in local schools for nearly a dozen years. It's a cultural problem, Jackson says, that only compounds the other issues facing many schools in southern Mississippi — like poverty, unstable home lives and high mobility rates, as families move in and out of assignments at the local Air Force base.
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Children's Book Award deadline today
NAESP
Calling all aspiring authors. Submissions for National Children's Book Award Contest are due today, March 15. Prospective authors may submit a picture or chapter book written for children ages 3-16. Judging will be based on content, originality and age-appropriateness. Winners will receive a contract with Charlesbridge Publishing.
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Take the right steps with Principal magazine
NAESP
In education, change is the norm. It's up to school leaders to embrace the change process and tackle its myriad challenges. The March/April issue of Principal explores transitions, and how effective education leaders can keep their schools on track during periods of change. Check out articles on P-3 alignment, brain development, Common Core assessments and much more.
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Before the Bell is a benefit of your membership in the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). For information about other member benefits, visit www.naesp.org or contact us at naesp@naesp.org.

Before the Bell is a digest of the most important news selected for NAESP from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The presence of such advertising does not endorse, or imply endorsement of, any products or services by NAESP. Neither NAESP nor Multiview is liable for the use of or reliance on any information contained in this briefing.

Feedback about an article? Contact NAESP Liaison Meredith Barnett at MBarnett@naesp.org.
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601   Download media kit
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