This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.


Advertisement


Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit March 20, 2015

Curriculum    School Leadership   Federal Advocacy & Policy   In the States   Association News   Buy Books   Contact NAESP


Advertisement


Let Kids Fly with ZipKrooz™


ZipKrooz™ brings zip line-like adventure to the playground in an exciting, inclusive and safe way!


Car Line Signs & Tags

Helping elementary schools organize their Car Pool line.

Staff will easily recognize where a child should be at the end of the day.
Visit: www.carlinetags.com

 





Reversing the teacher dropout problem
Scholastic Administrator Magazine
Each year, about a half million teachers are hired. School systems spend significant amounts of resources, in both time and money, to recruit, hire and induct new teachers. Despite this expenditure, up to half of all new teachers will become "dropouts" within their first five years. For school systems nationwide, the costs of new teacher dropouts are substantial — estimated at $2.2 billion per year. For students, this teacher turnover impacts the quality of instruction they receive. Since a major proportion of new teachers are assigned to high-poverty schools, the negative impact on poor children is continuous.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




Should schools be allowed to copyright teachers' work?
By: Archita Datta Majumdar
A growing debate about copyrighting K-12 students' and teachers' work is taking place across school districts. Universities have known and valued their faculty's intellectual property for a long time, resulting in detailed contracts and intellectual property rules. We are now witnessing a similar possessiveness from school districts across the U.S. As more K-12 teachers are using the latest technology to create and sell unique lesson plans and other teaching materials, the authorities are up in arms. The question is whether these lesson plans belong to the school districts for whom those teachers work or the teachers who created the materials.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Add coding to your elementary curriculum. . . right now
Edutopia (commentary)
Code.org sums up the situation nicely: "Computer science drives innovation in the U.S. economy and society. Despite growing demand for jobs in the field, it remains marginalized throughout the U.S. K-12 education system." There are many reasons for this. As you well know, teachers are already stretched pretty thin, and often it seems like there's just no bandwidth to add something new to a very full schedule. Additionally, some schools have few or no computers and/or tablets for classroom use.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT


What we talk about when we talk about best practices: Choosing materials
By: Debra Josephson Abrams
In previous articles, we have explored best practices in curricula, methods and approaches, and multiple instructional approaches. In this article, we will examine how to choose materials. Learner autonomy is connected to motivation. If a curriculum does not use materials relevant to learners, their motivation can — at best — lag. Gail K. Oura, David Nunan, Jerry G. Gebhard and many others make a powerful case for curriculum to use authentic materials.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Common Core tests were supposed to be immune to test prep. So why are kids spending weeks prepping anyway?
The Hechinger Report
Five weeks before the start of March testing, with excitement bubbling over for Mardi Gras, it was practice-test week at New Orleans’ John Dibert Community School at Phillis Wheatley. Instead of thinking about parades, beads and king cakes, fourth-graders were intent on the test papers before them and a large digital clock counting down on the whiteboard. Signs posted outside the classroom door cautioned "quiet, testing in progress."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement
PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  READY-TO-TEACH INTERVENTION

Have you identified students that are not proficient with the new grade level standards? Standards Plus® Common Core Intervention makes it easy to target, teach, and scaffold the prerequisite skills your students are missing.

DOWNLOAD SAMPLE LESSONS
 


Homework vs. no homework is the wrong question
Edutopia (commentary)
The real question we should be asking is, "What do we believe should happen after the end of the school day to help ensure that students retain what they have learned and are primed to learn more?" Any answer with the word, "work" in its name, as in "homework," is not typically going to be met with eagerness or enthusiasm by students. Ideally, we want children to understand that they are always learners. In school, we refer to them as "students" but outside of school, as children, they are still learners.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


What are the most challenging Common Core standards?
eSchool News
A new look into how students handle some of the toughest reading and math Common Core standards could help educators identify where they need to spend more time. Curriculum Associates recently conducted research using data from more than 750,000 students to identify the reading and math Common Core State Standards that students find the most challenging.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keywords COMMON CORE.


SPONSORED CONTENT
    1. WHICH ONE IS YOU?
       A. I have to push students through the basic language art skills.
       B. I have to teach what comes along even if students cannot understand it.
       C. I "Rescue" my students by using a structured and sequential approach that
           enhances any reading, spelling, penmanship, and composition curriculum
           including Common Core expectations.


K-12 digital curriculum growing; print shrinking
THE Journal
Curriculum publishers in K-12 have been shifting their product development to digital and away from print, according to Education Market Research, which surveyed around 100 publishers and manufacturers. The most common medium mentioned for delivering supplemental products was "online/digital" delivery; 82 percent of respondents cited that. Print followed with 65 percent. Over the course of 2013, the entire population of digital products grew by 43 percent; non-digital offerings dropped by 8 percent.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Zeroing out zero tolerance
The Atlantic
Recently, New York City's Department of Education, under Chancellor Carmen Fariña, called for an end to principal-led school suspensions without prior approval — a practice that grew in popularity during the Bloomberg years as part of a focus on "broken windows," or small crimes that herald disorder. And the Los Angeles Unified School District made a similar move two years ago, when it banned suspensions for "willful defiance," punishment that had a disproportionate impact on students of color. These large cities are at the vanguard of a shift away from zero-tolerance school discipline toward less punitive strategies that emphasize talking it out and resolving disputes among students to keep them in school.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Parents struggle to balance screen time rules with digital homework
MindShift
As technology becomes a more common feature of classrooms and computer-based testing becomes the norm, even the youngest learners are being pushed to master keyboarding and computing skills. But what does it feel like for a kindergartener, whose family has faithfully followed the American Academy of Pediatric's suggestions to limit screen time, to arrive at school and immediately be assessed on a computer?
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Better breakfast, better grades
Medical News Today
A new study from the University of Iowa reinforces the connection between good nutrition and good grades, finding that free school breakfasts help students from low-income families perform better academically. The study finds students who attend schools that participate in the U.S. Department of Agriculture's School Breakfast Program have higher achievement scores in math, science, and reading than students in schools that don't participate. "These results suggest that the persistent exposure to the relatively more nutritious breakfast offered through the subsidized breakfast program throughout elementary school can yield important gains in achievement," says researcher David Frisvold, assistant professor of economics in the Tippie College of Business.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement
PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Special Discount for NAESP Members!

As a member of NAESP, you could qualify for a special discount on car insurance with GEICO. Simply go online or call 1-800-368-2734, to complete a simple, no-obligation rate quote. Don’t forget to mention your NAESP membership to see how much you could save with your special member discount.
 


CoSN 2015: 10 reasons flipped classrooms could change education
EdTech Magazine
Today's classrooms are outfitted with the latest technologies, but too often the teaching methods don't take full advantage of the options these tools afford. Flipping the classroom — inverting the time spent on lecturing and homework — can create new inroads for learning by leveraging the technology used in classrooms and at home, says Kathleen Fulton, an author and president of Fulton Creative Consulting.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


School advertising goes digital
District Administration Magazine
Students in two Arizona districts will soon share the hallways with digital screens that display promotions for local and national vendors. This technological incursion is furthering a national debate over whether or not this kind of marketing is appropriate for students, though it brings in much needed revenue for cash-strapped districts. The digital billboards resemble large touch-screen tablets, and will be placed in schools in Sunnyside USD and Vail School District in southern Arizona. Part of the screen will be used for school announcements, and the other will host ads from companies such as Subway and Nike. The district can review the ads and reject any that administrators feel are inappropriate, says Sunnyside USD spokesperson Mary Veres.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE






Senate budget blueprint thin on education policy, funding details
Education Week
Senate Republicans unveiled their fiscal year 2016 budget proposal — and, similar to the one released yesterday by their GOP colleagues in the House, it's short on education specifics. Like the House budget proposal, the Senate's would fund the federal government to the tune of $493 billion, keeping in place the across-the-board spending caps, known as the sequester, to which the president's proposed budget does not adhere. And, like the House plan, it would make even steeper cuts for non-defense discretionary funding beginning fiscal 2017.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Arne Duncan: School funding inequality makes education 'separate and unequal'
The Huffington Post
Many school systems remain "fundamentally separate and unequal," U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan said Friday, with 23 states spending more per pupil in affluent school districts than they do in high-poverty districts. What's more, Duncan said on a call with reporters, the inequality may be getting worse. Duncan alluded to Republican-backed efforts to overhaul the No Child Left Behind Act, which he said would give even more money to well-off school districts at the expense of struggling districts. In February, House Republicans proposed the Student Success Act as a rewrite of No Child Left Behind.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  FEATURED COMPANIES
Advertisement
The Fundamentals for Teaching Smarter

"The Fundamental 5 improves instruction. The power of these practices will transform classrooms and schools," E. Don Brown, NASSP past president. Order now at Amazon.com
Advertise here!

To find out how to feature your company in the NAESP eNewsletter and other advertising opportunities, Contact Geoffrey Forneret at 469.420.2629.
MORE




States prepare public for Common Core test results
Education Week
Even as states begin administering new tests aligned with the Common Core State Standards, they are ramping up efforts to eliminate or minimize public backlash when the scores — widely expected to be markedly lower than results from previous assessments — are released later this year. From old-fashioned fliers designed to reach parents via students' backpacks to webinars intended for administrators and teachers, states including Illinois and New Jersey are using a diverse set of resources and partnering with various groups to prepare school communities and the general public for what's coming.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Closing arguments begin in test cheating trial of 12 Atlanta educators
The New York Times
After more than five years of controversy and five months of testimony, a prosecutor used seven words to recap the accusations against the dozen Atlanta educators seated in a courtroom here. "They cheated," the prosecutor, John E. Floyd, told the jurors in Fulton County Superior Court. "They lied. And they stole." Mr. Floyd's scornful summary came near the start of what will be days of closing arguments centered on whether significant increases in standardized test scores in Atlanta's public schools came about because of endemic cheating and what prosecutors say was criminal misconduct that included racketeering.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Why some parents are sitting kids out of tests (NPR)
What educators need to know about the 'cloud' in K-12 (Education World)
Surveillance vs. supervision: Understanding the difference (K-12TechDecisions)
Twitter 101: 5-step guide for social media in education (Edudemic)
Telling or teaching? Knowing when it's right to 'give a fish' (By Pamela Hill)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




House ESEA update: Bill pulled from floor after principals' victory
NAESP
The process to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act continues to unfold with unexpected developments. Here is a brief update on the action and where things stand as Congress continues to work quickly to renew the law. Both the House and Senate continue to push forward; their goal is to pass bills by the middle of this month.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Apply by March 23 for Student Council Excellence Awards
NAESP
Recognize your student council's hard work with the American Student Council Association Student Excellence Awards. Since 1987, this prestigious award has honored excellence in leadership, citizenship and community service. The deadline to submit your application is March 23. Applicants must submit the $10.00 processing fee by this deadline to be considered.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
 


Before the Bell is a benefit of your membership in the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). For information about other member benefits, visit www.naesp.org or contact us at naesp@naesp.org.

Before the Bell is a digest of the most important news selected for NAESP from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The presence of such advertising does not endorse, or imply endorsement of, any products or services by NAESP. Neither NAESP nor Multiview is liable for the use of or reliance on any information contained in this briefing.

Feedback about an article? Contact NAESP Liaison Meredith Barnett at MBarnett@naesp.org.
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601   Download media kit
This edition of Before the Bell was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here.

NAESP | 1615 Duke Street | Alexandria, VA 22314 | www.naesp.org | 800-386-2377
Recent issues
March 13, 2015
March 10, 2015
March 6, 2015
March 3, 2015



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063