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Moving To Success embraces the belief that students who become competent movers and are knowledgeable regarding the health-related benefits of being physically active are more likely to lead a physically active lifestyle.
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Elementary math, reading skills at age 7 linked to financial success at midlife, according to study
The Huffington Post
It may seem hard to figure, but provocative new research suggests that an individual's math and reading skills in elementary school are key indicators of his/her socioeconomic status in adulthood. In fact, the study — conducted by a pair of researchers at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland — showed that math and reading skills at age 7 are the most reliable predictors of SES at age 42. Study co-author Stuart Ritchie, a doctoral student at the university, told The Huffington Post in an email that he was surprised by the findings.
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In Newtown's wake: How grief is handled at school
Edutopia (commentary)
Christine Park, the president of New York Life Foundation, writes: "In the months since the horrific Newtown school shooting, a media spotlight has glared on the nearly 450 surviving students at Sandy Hook Elementary who are grieving for their friends, teachers, classmates, school staff and, in some cases, their siblings. Their stories serve as an enduring reminder of the overpowering grief and loss left in the Newtown tragedy's wake."
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Education reform's next big thing: Common Core standards ramp up
The Christian Science Monitor
In an Algebra I class at Mountain View High School, a freshman girl is struggling with a new assignment: The students are working in small groups to try to find the number of different-shaped tiles needed to cover a certain size tabletop – and then how to find a pattern and extrapolate on that answer for other sizes. "Is this supposed to be hard or easy?" she asks her teacher in frustration. "It's supposed to make you think," replies Kristina Smith, the teacher, as she patiently circles through the room, responding to each student's questions not with an answer but with additional questions that encourage them to push themselves to the next step. What's going on at this school in Loveland, Colo., as well as across the United States, is a key step in a long-running shift to national standards. These Common Core standards, which have been adopted by 45 states, have the potential to drastically change curriculum in elementary, middle, and high schools around the country.
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Sequestration forces cuts to national social studies tests
Education Week
Fewer students will take national tests in civics, history, and geography, thanks to across-the-board spending cuts known as sequestration. The executive committee of the National Assessment Governing Board, on the recommendation of the National Center for Education Statistics — which administers the National Assessment of Educational Progress or NAEP — voted recently to indefinitely postpone the fourth and 12th grade tests in the three subjects for 2014. The exams will continue for 8th-graders.
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Common Core supporters firing back
Education Week
Supporters of the Common Core State Standards are moving to confront increasingly high-profile opposition to the standards at the state and national levels by rallying the private sector and initiating coordinated public relations and advertising campaigns as schools continue implementation. In states such as Michigan and Tennessee, where Common Core opponents feel momentum is with them, state education officials, the business community and allied advocacy groups are ramping up efforts to define and buttress support for the standards —and to counter what they say is misinformation.
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  • Why reading aloud to older children is valuable
    MindShift
    Educator and author Jessica Lahey reads Shakespeare and Dickens aloud to her seventh- and eighth-graders, complete with all the voices. Her students love being read to, and sometimes get so carried away with the story, she allows them to lie on the floor and close their eyes just to listen and enjoy it. Lahey reads short stories aloud, too: "My favorite story to read out loud has to be Poe's 'Tell-tale Heart.' I heighten the tension and get a little nuts-o as the narrator starts to really go off the rails. So much fun."
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    Teaching active reputation management: 5 steps for sanitizing facebook accounts
    Tech & Learning
    Collectively, all of the digital content you create, and that others create about you, becomes your online reputation. And today, that's the reputation that matters the most. Active “Reputation Management" includes both using proactive measures to keep from sharing content harmful to reputations, and measures to "sanitize" or clean-up damaging content already posted.
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    32 summer professional development opportunities
    eSchool News
    It's a common misconception that education professionals have summer vacation like their students. But anyone who's been a teacher, administrator or even superintendent knows that summer is the perfect opportunity for professional development. Whether it's attending online webinars, traveling to workshops or sitting down for a good read, there are plenty of opportunities to brush up on Common Core State Standards, 21st century leadership and technology integration this summer.
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    School reform or tuition vouchers?
    The Huffington Post (commentary)
    Seventeen states offer vouchers to pay the tuition for students to attend elementary, middle and high schools that are not their normal local public schools. This accelerating trend has paralleled recent years' declining public opinion regarding the quality of public schools.
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    Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword SCHOOL VOUCHERS.


    Study suggests private school children are more physically active than state school children
    Medical News Today
    A pilot study of schools in Sheffield, U.K., suggests that activity levels of children in independent (or private) schools may be higher than that of their state school counterparts. A significant number of children are insufficiently active for good health. The school that children attend affects their physical activity level. However, no research to date has looked to determine a difference between physical activity levels of children at independent compared with state schools in the U.K.
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    School technology grants should go to schools with a real plan
    The Hill (commentary)
    Over the past decade, the United States has spent upwards of $100 billion on K-12 classroom technology to no discernible effect. The reason is clear: most education technology in use in K-12 classrooms is not integrated into core instruction, and thus offers limited educational value. This is largely the story with Congressman George Miller's, D-Calif., "Transforming Education Through Technology Act of 2013," which aims to improve the use of technology in K-12 schools.
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    TRENDING ARTICLES
    Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

        School principals share keys to success (eSchool News)
    States' online testing problems raise Common Core concerns (Education Week)
    Learning takes time: Growing movement seeks to expand length of school day (Deseret News)
    Most parents support mobile learning devices (eClassroom News)
    Report: Why it is hard to monitor bullying at schools (The Washington Post)

    Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


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    E-rate needs overhaul for digital era, experts argue
    Education Week
    As school districts strive to put more technology into schools to support 1-to-1 computing initiatives and prepare for the common-core online assessments, the federal E-rate program is in danger of becoming as outdated and insufficient as a sputtering dial-up connection in a Wi-Fi world. While the program can boast great success since its inception — just 14 percent of schools were connected to the Internet when the E-rate was launched in 1996, compared with near-universal access today — it is now at risk of buckling under the weight of districts' technological demands in the age of laptops, tablets, smartphones and 24/7 online activity.
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    Chicago teachers union heads to court to stop school closings
    The Washington Post
    The Chicago Teachers' Union filed two complaints in federal court trying to stop the city from closing 53 elementary schools, arguing that the closures disproportionately affect African American students and would also cause great harm to special education students. The city's board of education, appointed by Mayor Rahm Emanuel, is poised to vote on the closures May 22. If approved, the shutdown would be the largest mass school closing in any major U.S. city. School officials say they need to close the schools to solve a $1 billion budget shortfall in the country's third largest school system.
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    Why reading aloud to older children is valuable
    MindShift
    Educator and author Jessica Lahey reads Shakespeare and Dickens aloud to her seventh- and eighth-graders, complete with all the voices. Her students love being read to, and sometimes get so carried away with the story, she allows them to lie on the floor and close their eyes just to listen and enjoy it.

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    Is the Common Core initiative in trouble?
    The Washington Post
    Education Secretary Arne Duncan recently met with Chamber of Commerce leaders and urged them to be more vocal and forceful in defending the Common Core State Standards. Why?

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    States pull back from Common Core
    U.S. News & World Report
    Lawmakers in some states hope to halt the transition to the Common Core State Standards, even as school districts across the country are rolling them out.

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    Utah charter school nurtures entrepreneurial spirit
    NPR
    A new charter school in Utah wants to equip students in kindergarten through ninth grade with a solid foundation in business. Students' daily lessons are peppered with concepts like sales and marketing, finance and entrepreneurship, says first-grade teacher Tammy Hill. "And that plays into leadership and improved math skills. And finance plays into every part of their lives." About 580 students attend Highmark Charter School in a suburb just north of Salt Lake City. They earn play money by turning in homework on time and performing chores. They're encouraged to make items and sell them to each other.
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    Alerts raised over Massachusetts plan to manage student data
    The Boston Globe
    An experiment by Massachusetts education officials to better manage student records and software teaching tools has privacy advocates concerned it could expose the private information of thousands of schoolchildren to hackers and identity thieves. Massachusetts is among a handful of states participating in a pilot project with inBloom, an Atlanta nonprofit helping schools to beef up and simplify the wide variety of computer systems used to record student information, administer tests, analyze performance, train teachers and gather other data.
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    Breakfast bill signed into law
    EdNews Colorado
    Gov. John Hickenlooper signed the bill intended to expand student participation in breakfast programs at high-poverty schools. The media event took place at Rose Hill Elementary School in Commerce City and included breakfast in a classroom. The Adams 14 district, where Rose Hill is located, has been a leader in providing breakfast to all students after the school day starts. The new law would require that schools with 80 percent of more students eligible for free- and reduced-price meals to serve breakfast after school starts and to all students, even those not individually eligible.
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    School alters approach to good behavior
    Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
    At Pittsburgh Faison K-5 in Homewood, fifth-grader Sha'nya Currington was so excited to be recognized for her good behavior that she ran across the gym, jumped up and gave a huge hug to educator Janice Motley. Motley was announcing both good news and bad to third- through fifth-graders. The good news for Sha'nya was she is now considered a "positive." She had been a positive before, but she had dropped to a "neutral" because, she said, "I kept talking." Such news also brought cheers from the other students in grades 3-5 who were seated on the gym floor for a weekly "leveling" meeting. Students in lower grades have their own assemblies by grade level.
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    8th-grader uses social media in a positive way
    Canton Patch
    Canton, Conn., Middle School student Brianna Marino knows that social media can have its pitfalls but she also knows it can be a force for good, whether it's loved ones reaching out to each other during a crisis or simply spreading the word about a positive effort. So for her Odyssey Project, for which eighth-graders explore a career path or work on a social service project, Marino decided to document and track random acts of kindness on Instagram. It's aptly titled Gram you Kindness. She likens it to a tree, with the added photos being the branches.
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    Get the scoop on PLCs
    NAESP
    Ready to implement the Professional Learning Community at Work™ process? In a webinar on Tuesday, May 21, Rebecca DuFour and Richard DuFour will explore the critical components needed to lay the foundation of a professional learning community. Learn how to build collaborative team structures, monitor them effectively and maximize your communication. Register now for this free professional development opportunity.
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    Invest in the future: Become a mentor
    NAESP
    Being a principal is a tough job, especially with today's increasing demands on school leaders. Mentoring can provide crucial support to new principals. The NAESP National Mentor Program is designed to engage experienced or retired principals to give back to the profession by supporting new, newly assigned, or even experienced principals through mentoring. Ready to dive in? The next training session is June 19-21 in Seaside, Ore. Visit the mentor program page to register or to see dates for other upcoming trainings.
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