This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.


Advertisement


Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit May 19, 2015

Curriculum    School Leadership   Federal Advocacy & Policy   In the States   Association News   Buy Books   Contact NAESP


Advertisement


Let Kids Fly with ZipKrooz™


ZipKrooz™ brings zip line-like adventure to the playground in an exciting, inclusive and safe way!



 





Evolving principal role requires new professional development
District Administration Magazine
Principals shifting their roles from building manager to instructional leader need more extensive professional development to ensure top performance from teachers and students, according to a new policy brief from ASCD. Race to the Top's requirements linking teacher evaluations to student test scores is largely responsible for the change in the principal's responsibilities, says Susan Race, a former principal who is senior director of Professional Learning and Institutes at ASCD.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




Should teachers be held responsible for a student's character?
MindShift
If you've followed education in the news or at the book store in the past couple of years, chances are you've heard of "grit." It's often defined as the ability to persevere when times get tough, or to delay gratification in pursuit of a goal. Alongside growth mindset and self-control, grit is on a short list of not-strictly-academic skills, habits and qualities that researchers have deemed essential. And that research has quickly made its way into the hands of educational leaders eager to impose accountability measures that can go farther than standardized math and reading tests. They want to capture how schools are doing in cultivating the full range of qualities necessary for students to succeed.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




How virtualization makes BYOD a viable alternative to 1-to-1
THE Journal
Educational IT leaders should not be "trying to do the same thing you've always done for less money," but instead "doing something you can't do any other way," according to Doug Meade, the director of information technology at York County School Division in Virgina. In a session at the Citrix Synergy conference in Orlando, Florida, Meade described how York County (which serves 12,700 students and 2,000 employees), was faced with a familiar problem.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT


Under Common Core, students learn words by learning about the world
Education Week
As many educators and researchers will attest, there's no exact science to choosing vocabulary words — no inherent reason the word "detest" is more important to teach than "despise," or why "compassion" should be highlighted in a text before "sympathy." But some reading experts, including those who helped write the Common Core State Standards, are saying what's critical about vocabulary instruction is how the words are introduced — and that context is key.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Can students click their way to a better world?
The Hechinger Report
The rap on kids these days is that they don't know much about civic life, and they care even less. But a growing group of scholars says the problem isn't with the kids, but rather with an outdated approach to teaching civics. The public square is increasingly online, they argue, and that's where civics education needs to go, too. Instead of addressing our civics shortcomings just by adding more classes and mandating tests, we should tap technology to better engage young people in both the learning and the doing of democracy.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement
PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  READY-TO-TEACH INTERVENTION

Have you identified students that are not proficient with the new grade level standards? Standards Plus® Common Core Intervention makes it easy to target, teach, and scaffold the prerequisite skills your students are missing.

DOWNLOAD SAMPLE LESSONS
 


Let the kids learn through play
The New York Times (commentary)
Twenty years ago, kids in preschool, kindergarten and even first and second grade spent much of their time playing: building with blocks, drawing or creating imaginary worlds, in their own heads or with classmates. But increasingly, these activities are being abandoned for the teacher-led, didactic instruction typically used in higher grades. In many schools, formal education now starts at age 4 or 5. Without this early start, the thinking goes, kids risk falling behind in crucial subjects such as reading and math, and may never catch up.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


How poetry can open a whole new world for children with autism
The Huffington Post
Chris Martin has been teaching creative writing to children with autism for more than 10 years. Children with autism often struggle in school because of their restricted interests (usually characterized by one very intense passion), but Martin has found a way to turn this characteristic into a vehicle for learning. "These restricted interests are often portrayed negatively," he writes. "In that they limit the student's ability to access a wider range of interests."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT
    1. WHICH ONE IS YOU?
       A. I have to push students through the basic language art skills.
       B. I have to teach what comes along even if students cannot understand it.
       C. I "Rescue" my students by using a structured and sequential approach that
           enhances any reading, spelling, penmanship, and composition curriculum
           including Common Core expectations.


8 ways to improve your digital teaching
eSchool News
We all remember that one dedicated teacher from our early years. While they might not have had access to the same technology we do, they brought the world to us with images, stories, and play-pretend. They likely would've been one of the first to Skype with amazing people across the globe, competitively Kahoot, or have us build word clouds to help us learn vocabulary. They were full of life and encouraged us to find our personality. In short, they were great teachers. Good teaching is the result of the conscious engagement between the teacher and the students, in an environment fostering inquiry, discovery, and creation. Good teaching is what makes digital age environments meaningful to students. Good pedagogy is the key to learning, regardless of the tool.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


The value of studying students' problem-solving processes in math
Education Week (commentary)
Justin Reich, who writes the Education Week opinion blog EdTech Researcher, had a nice post about the value of studying student work. The Common Core's Standards for Mathematical Practice ask students to explain their thinking, model and communicate precisely — and that often means showing how they worked though a problem. Along those lines, Reich, an education researcher, wrote about a project in which he, math teacher Michael Pershan, and a group of undergraduate education students at MIT examined fourth-graders' solutions to math problems to try to glean what they were thinking.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Bringing peace to the school playground
Dr. Melinda Bossenmeye
During a game of four-square at Theodore Roosevelt Elementary School Wednesday, second-graders Luis Reyes, 7, and Cassidy McNeill, 8, reached an impasse over a point. “It was in,” Luis said. “It’s out!” Cassidy fired back. But before the conflict escalated any further, the two broke out into a spontaneous game of rock-paper-scissors and Luis — losing his paper to Cassidy’s scissors on the first throw — skipped away without further debate to join the other students in line waiting to play.
Share this article:  
READ MORE
Promoted by Dr. Melinda Bossenmeye




What you need to know when shopping for an ID card system
Scholastic Administration Magazine
Being in school every day is vital for a student's success, and with state funding associated with attendance, it is also important financially for school districts to minimize absenteeism. Improvements in ID card system technology are helping to streamline the attendance process in timely, cost-effective ways. Many districts have discovered that implementing such a system is well worth the commitment and investment, and others are finding that it's time to upgrade their current systems. There are a number of important factors to consider when you're shopping around for an ID card vendor/partner; here are some key elements to think about.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Laws against junk food in schools help rich students more than poor ones
Los Angeles Times
Since state laws made it harder for California elementary school kids to get their hands on sugary drinks and junk food snacks on campus, researchers found, students' risk of becoming overweight or obese fell slightly — but mostly if they came from higher-income neighborhoods. Examining body mass index measurements of 2,700,880 fifth-graders in the state over 10 years, researchers found that students in those neighborhoods saw their odds of exceeding a healthy weight fall by about 1 percent a year. For all other students, the trends remained essentially flat.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement
PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Special Discount for NAESP Members!

As a member of NAESP, you could qualify for a special discount on car insurance with GEICO. Simply go online or call 1-800-368-2734, to complete a simple, no-obligation rate quote. Don’t forget to mention your NAESP membership to see how much you could save with your special member discount.
 


Protecting student privacy in the digital age
The Hill
Schools may be winding down to the end of the school year, but as they do so, they are also ratcheting up the use of technology to bolster student engagement. Whether on a computer or in the cloud, digital tools are being used to help improve students' reading, writing and arithmetic skills. But as student information moves from folders in a cabinet to the folders in the cloud, we need to ensure that the enormous power of technology is harnessed to the benefit of students and not for any unknown means.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keywords TECHNOLOGY.


Is it nature or nurture that makes kids love school?
Yahoo Parenting
What makes an individual kid like school and want to do well in the classroom? Is it the fact that their parents instilled in them a love of learning? A high-energy, engaging teacher? Or other, less easily observed factors? According to a new study in Personality and Individual Differences, genetics play a pretty large role — and environmental factors may matter less than people think.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Educators spill their top STEM challenges and priorities
eSchool News
A new survey of district and building-level STEM supervisors and educators reveals how the Next Generation Science Standards or other updated science standards, as well as STEM learning goals, are influencing STEM education decisions or purchases. The 2015 Business Report: National Survey STEM Education, from IESD, Inc. and STEM Market Impact, surveyed 5,002 K-12 district and school science and STEM supervisors and teachers online.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




School bullying, cyberbullying continue to drop
U.S. News & World Report
The percentage of students who reported being bullied or cyberbullied reached a record low in 2013, but female students are still victimized at higher rates, according to new data from the Department of Education. The department released the results of the latest School Crime Supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey, which showed that in 2013, the percentage of students ages 12-18 who reported being bullied dropped to 21.5 percent. That's down from 27.8 percent in 2011, and a high of 31.7 percent in 2007. The percentage of students who reported being cyberbullied also fell to 6.9 percent in 2013, down from 9 percent in 2011.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  FEATURED COMPANIES
Advertisement
The Fundamentals for Teaching Smarter

"The Fundamental 5 improves instruction. The power of these practices will transform classrooms and schools," E. Don Brown, NASSP past president. Order now at Amazon.com
Advertise here!

To find out how to feature your company in the NAESP eNewsletter and other advertising opportunities, Contact Geoffrey Forneret at 469.420.2629.
MORE




Alabama schools now required to offer virtual courses
EdTech Magazine
Alabama is stepping up its virtual classroom presence with new legislation that mandates that public school systems offer more online instruction options. More than 30 states now offer fully online public schools, and Alabama was among the first states to offer online coursework. The Evergreen Education Group's annual report, "Keeping Pace with K–12 Digital Learning," says Alabama has 51,809 students enrolled in virtual courses, the third-highest online enrollment in the country.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


School-grown vegetables increase salad selection
Medical Xpress
If kids grow vegetables, they're more likely to eat them. A new Cornell study published in Acta Paediatrica shows that when garden grown vegetables were slipped into school salads, kids were over four times as likely to take a salad. "This is a small study, but it suggests gardens can help children's diets — even in the snow belt," said lead author Brian Wansink PhD, Director of the Cornell Food and Brand Lab and author of Slim by Design. This pilot study, conducted in upstate New York, measured the change in vegetable selection and plate waste when school grown salad greens were incorporated in the cafeteria school lunch. The researchers measured the selections and plate waste of a total of 370 enrolled high school students over three separate days.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    New read-aloud strategies transform story time (Education Week)
The pathway to Common Core success (Center for American Progress)
There's an unexpected downside to more kids getting free meals at school (TakePart)
Physical education takes a hit: Schools' emphasis on testing is making kids sick (Truthout)
Friends or frenemies? Understanding bullying in schools (Psychology Today)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




3 tips to modernize your school
NAESP
Schools must design more contemporary approaches to teaching and learning, according to Heidi Hayes Jacobs, author and founder of Curriculum 21. At the 2015 NAESP Annual Conference in July, Jacobs will present The Future of Education: Mapping the Big Picture, examining how schools can transition to create timely, relevant, innovative learning experiences for students. Here's a preview of her recommendations.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


New principal? Join the National Panel of New Principals
NAESP
NAESP's new principal panel is the first and only national program dedicated to gathering and sharing the experiences of new principals in rural, urban and suburban schools across the country. Panelists participate in six online surveys each year on a relevant topic, which take less than 10 minutes to complete. Panelists receive the survey results and resource recommendations from their peers, and for each survey completed, panelists also receive a $10 credit for the National Principals Resource Center online store or merchandise from national sponsors such as Scholastic.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
 


Before the Bell is a benefit of your membership in the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). For information about other member benefits, visit www.naesp.org or contact us at naesp@naesp.org.

Before the Bell is a digest of the most important news selected for NAESP from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The presence of such advertising does not endorse, or imply endorsement of, any products or services by NAESP. Neither NAESP nor Multiview is liable for the use of or reliance on any information contained in this briefing.

Feedback about an article? Contact NAESP Liaison Ned Colbert at EColbert@naesp.org.
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601   Download media kit
This edition of Before the Bell was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here.

NAESP | 1615 Duke Street | Alexandria, VA 22314 | www.naesp.org | 800-386-2377
Recent issues
May 12, 2015
May 8, 2015
May 5, 2015
May 1, 2015



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063