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Special education tactics aide Common Core success
District Administration Magazine
A curriculum framework initially developed for special education students is gaining traction in general ed classrooms nationwide during Common Core implementation. Universal Design for Learning is an approach created by a nonprofit that addresses students' individual learning needs to reach standards. Teachers allow students multiple ways of accessing information and demonstrating understanding for each lesson or assignment in order to differentiate learning. The Common Core expects students to demonstrate mastery in multiple ways.
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Should school districts allow ads on buses?
CBS MoneyWatch
An advertising watchdog group is urging parents to fight the growing popularity of school bus ads, arguing that they unfairly target young, impressionable consumers. The ads are allowed in New Jersey, Texas, Arizona, Massachusetts, Colorado, Massachusetts, Utah, Nevada and New Mexico, according to the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood. Legislation to allow them was recently enacted in Georgia, and a bus ad bill is pending in Oklahoma. One recently passed the Indiana State Senate.
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Coding in the classroom: 16 top resources
Edudemic
As cool as technology is, its intricacies and inner workings are sometimes intimidating, especially for young people who may be more interested in what technology can do for them rather than what they can do with technology. However, when students hurdle that obstacle and see the value of computer science — specifically coding — they gain a broadened perspective and the potential for a rewarding career in the tech field. The following resources will help you teach your students the basics of coding and will provide tips on how to keep kids interested as you go.
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Summers with substance: How summer programs can further learning
By: Corinne Garcia
As a parent preparing for my child's upcoming summer vacation, I'm always on edge about the summer learning loss, also known as the infamous "summer slide." The National Summer Learning Association reports that most students lose an average of two months of grade-level equivalency in math over the summer. But that's not all. If they are not kept properly occupied, they also tend to lose precious motivation.
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What do you do with a student who fidgets?
NPR (commentary)
Anya Kamenetz, a contributor for NPR, writes: "Our story last week about the connection between ADHD, movement and thinking struck a nerve with readers. We reported on a small study in which students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder performed better on memory tasks when they were allowed to spin and move around in a swiveling chair. We got hundreds of comments, tweets and emails. Even the CEO of Donors Choose, a fundraising site for teachers, wrote in to say that there are 1,455 projects with the key word 'fidget' on his site. More than 1,000 teachers requested something called a 'Hokki Stool' — a backless seat that allows kids to sit and wiggle."
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Favorite tech tools for social studies classes
MindShift
Educators are looking for ways to help students participate in a digital world, but the choices for digital engagement in the classroom can be overwhelming. Many teachers have little to no money to pay for premium versions of apps and are looking for quick and easy ways to determine how an app works. They must also consider why it might be useful for their teaching practice.
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Bridging the cultural gap for ELLs
By: Douglas Magrath
Language and culture are intertwined. Culture is a part of life, and students need to understand the cultural implications of reading material. One can learn a lot about a specific culture group by reading its fiction, poetry and theatrical works. ESL students can learn about the culture of the host country from their readings, so the cultural biases inherent in the readings can be approached as an additional learning experience. Cultural situations in the texts can be great starting points for conversation as well as contrastive writing assignments.
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How do you motivate kids to stop skipping school?
NPR
It seems like a no-brainer: Offer kids a reward for showing up at school, and their attendance will shoot up. But a recent study of third-graders in a slum in India suggests that incentive schemes can do more harm than good. The study, a working paper released by the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, looked at 799 boys and girls. The kids, mostly age 9, were students in several dozen single-classroom schools run by the nonprofit Gyan Shala in some of the poorest neighborhoods in the city of Ahmedabad.
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Teaching students the skills of expert readers
Edutopia
Research shows that skilled or expert readers possess seven strategies to construct meaning before, during, and after reading a text. When skilled students read, it is an active process. Their minds are constantly processing information extracted from the text, e.g., questioning the author, summarizing passages, or interpreting images. Contrarily, struggling readers often unthinkingly read the words on the page. For them, reading is an inactive activity. Constructing meaning from the text does not naturally occur in the mind of a struggling reader.
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Physical activity and the brain: Why active kids make better learners
By Dr. Melinda Bossenmeyer
“Physical activity has dramatic effects on individuals’ physical mental health,” according to Charles Basch in his report, Healthier Students Make Better Learners. Research findings out of the neurosciences and child development literature continue to make a compelling case for the link between a healthy body and a healthy mind. This literature documents the importance of physical education and physical fitness and their effect on academic outcomes.
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Promoted by By Dr. Melinda Bossenmeyer


Board shortens Common Core-aligned tests known as PARCC
The Washington Post
The Common Core-aligned tests that made their debut in 11 states and the District this spring will be approximately 90 minutes shorter next year, a change that comes after parents, teachers and school administrators expressed frustration with the amount of time devoted to the new exams. The governing board of the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers voted to shorten the tests. The board, made up of state superintendents, also voted to give the exams during one 30-day testing window near the end of the school year.
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Making your classroom more like a playground
Te@chThought
Should classrooms be more like playgrounds? The playground is a place of whimsy, creativity, cognitive "ease," and social interaction. It's accessible, open, and fun. There may be some room for this type of thinking in a classroom, yes? Embedded in this thinking are a lot of the ideas that we promote consistently at TeachThought, from learning through play, to student-centeredness, to interdependence, and "messiness."
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Inspiring progress toward learning goals
Edutopia
The topic of metacognition can seem quite abstract — a complex concept for students to embrace. But it is worth the effort to develop a metacognitive mindset in setting goals for learning and in monitoring progress toward achieving those goals. For teachers empowering students to think about their thinking with the aim of improving learning, it can be truly inspiring when they see the resulting changes in students' motivation, resilience and learning gains.
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Expeditionary learning gets kids out of the classroom, into the field
eSchool News
When juniors at Casco Bay High School in Portland, Maine, recently visited Queens, New York to study the effects of Hurricane Sandy, they weren't on your ordinary field trip. Instead of touring museums or taking in the sights, they performed service work, helping those affected by the 2012 storm as they continue to recover, and created multimedia documentaries about the lasting impacts.
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Obesity disparity grew among US kindergarteners
Reuters
Obesity rates among children entering kindergarten in the U.S. have increased since 1998 — except among those from the wealthiest families, according to new research. The findings, published in JAMA Pediatrics, add to evidence that suggests not all young people are benefiting from a leveling out of obesity rates as reported last year by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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Report outlines how to shift to tech-enabled personalized learning
eSchool News
A new report has combined the recommendations and observations more than 100 educators who gathered last year to compare experiences, discuss common challenges and barriers, explore case studies and identify potential solutions and models that all must be addressed collectively to scale the implementation of personalized learning through technology. The educators gathered at the Technology-Enabled Personalized Learning Summit hosted by the Institute for Educational Innovation at NC State University in collaboration with Digital Promise, the Software & Information Industry Association and the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators.
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Looking to the future of classroom tech
EdTech Magazine
Some educators are called to the classroom, but others are called to take on leadership roles on the national stage. Through his work as the state and district digital learning director for the policy and advocacy organization Alliance for Excellent Education, Tom Murray has testified before national legislators on educational technology issues. He also helps lead educational online awareness programs, such as Digital Learning Day and Future Ready.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keywords TECHNOLOGY.


Long-term gains seen for kids who leave poor neighborhoods
Education Week
The younger children are when they move out of impoverished neighborhoods, the better their long-term outcomes are, including college-attendance rates and later salary levels, according to two studies released this month. Those results may derive in part from the likelihood that children in low-poverty neighborhoods are more liable to be given second chances in any number of situations, said a researcher who worked on one of the studies.
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On Head Start's 50th anniversary, 5 things you should know about the program
The Huffington Post
Fifty years ago, President Lyndon Johnson announced the creation of Head Start, a program designed to provide early childhood education services to low-income children before they entered school. The program, initiated as part of President Johnson's War on Poverty, was meant to attack poverty at its roots by helping to give disadvantaged kids some of same educational opportunities as affluent ones.
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State lawmakers balance concerns on student-data privacy
Education Week
Building on last year's energetic debate in states over how best to protect student data, legislators have intensified efforts in 2015 to address the issue in statehouses. And this year, there's particularly prominent tension between privacy advocates concerned about loopholes through which data can be shared and used inappropriately, and the education technology providers who don't want restrictions on access to learning software and other services.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    New read-aloud strategies transform story time (Education Week)
The pathway to Common Core success (Center for American Progress)
There's an unexpected downside to more kids getting free meals at school (TakePart)
Physical education takes a hit: Schools' emphasis on testing is making kids sick (Truthout)
Friends or frenemies? Understanding bullying in schools (Psychology Today)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




Apply for a creativity grant from Crayola and NAESP
NAESP
Strengthen arts education in your school with a 2015 Champion Creatively Alive Children grant. Crayola will award up to 20 grants, which include a $2,500 monetary award and $1,000 worth of Crayola products. The deadline to apply is Monday, June 22.
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Keep families informed with Report to Parents
NAESP
NAESP's Report to Parents bulletin is a once-monthly handout for principals to share with parents and members of the school community. Each issue, published in both English and Spanish, offers tips to families on how to help their children at home and in school. The latest issue, "Exercise Kids' Minds During the Summer," can be found in the Report to Parents archives, along with previous editions.
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