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Moving
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Moving To Success embraces the belief that students who become competent movers and are knowledgeable regarding the health-related benefits of being physically active are more likely to lead a physically active lifestyle.
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7 key stats with important implications for schools
eSchool News
The percentage of U.S. students living in poverty jumped by 40 percent in the last decade, and total funding for K-12 education dropped by $1 billion from 2008-2009 to 2009-2010. Yet, despite these challenges, high school graduation rates are slowly climbing—and more students are completing math and science courses, according to the latest figures from the National Center on Education Statistics. Released May 23, "The Condition of Education 2013" — the latest in an annual series of reports from NCES, a branch of the U.S. Department of Education — is chock full of valuable statistics for policymakers and education leaders.
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So bake sales are taboo? Try selling hand sanitizer
The New York Times
Lynn Carlson, who teaches law and history at a Queens, N.Y., public school, could once count on bake sales and candy drives to raise thousands of dollars for her annual trip with students to Washington or Boston. That was before the New York City Department of Education, as part of an anti-obesity drive, began restricting what could be sold in machines and in fund-raising events held in schools. Out were brownies; in were granola bars. Out were chocolate chip cookies; in were gummy fruit snacks. Bake sales began to seem like little more than trips to a nutritionally correct vending machine.
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Teaching students better online research skills
Education Week
Sara Shaw, an elementary school teacher in Avon, Mass., realized she needed to teach online research skills several years ago when her students kept turning in projects riddled with misinformation. The flawed material often came from websites the students used. They took the information as fact, when it often was just someone's personal opinion. Shaw thinks teaching online research skills is even more critical than it was just a few years ago. More than ever, information is literally at the fingertips of students through smartphones, tablet computers and other digital devices.
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Caution and the Common Core
The New York Times (commentary)
The rigorous Common Core learning standards that have been adopted by 45 states represent a once-in-a-generation opportunity for the United States to improve public schools nationally, bringing math, science and literacy education up to levels achieved by high-performing nations abroad. The Department of Education has rightly pushed the states to jettison outmoded systems in exchange for a challenging, writing-intensive approach. But the department, which has set a rapid timetable for this transformation, will need to give the states some flexibility so that teachers — who themselves are under pressure to meet evaluation standards — can adjust to the new curriculum.
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Study shows graphic novels add value to K-12 student learning
The Independent Voter Network
Graphic novels may have a place in the classroom as an alternative form of literature, according to researchers. Diane Lapp, distinguished professor of education at San Diego State University — along with researchers Thomas DeVere Wolsey, Douglas Fisher and Nancy Frey — surveyed elementary, middle and high school teachers about the effectiveness of using graphic novels in the classroom as well as their willingness to use the material for primary instruction for their students.
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  • 5 ways to increase chances of a successful 1 to 1 implementation
    Tech & Learning
    As more and more schools hop on the 1:1 or BYOD bandwagon in one way or another, it is important to deeply consider proper implementation. While there is the promise for engaged and inspired learning, these large-scale implementations also present potential pitfalls for school districts that must watch the bottom line, provide adequate support for teachers new to the technology, and engage families in a dialogue about these powerful pieces of equipment that are going to be coming home in Johnny's backpack each night.
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    5 tech-savvy schools that focus on education technology
    eSchool News
    Many schools have learning technologies and education-technology tools. But what sets exemplary schools apart is how they use those technologies. Below are five schools, listed in alphabetical order, that are taking teaching and learning to the next level by leveraging ed-tech and learning technologies to boost student engagement and staff productivity. An ed-tech specialist or administrator from each school describes the school's accomplishments.
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    Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword BYOD.


    World Food Program: School lunches vital to children's health, education
    Voice of America
    Educators in low-income areas everywhere struggle with one of the most basic hurdles to teaching children — students showing up to school hungry. The U.N. World Food Program said in its 2013 State of School Feeding Worldwide report that supplying meals and snacks to students is a proven benefit, but that the programs are still not reaching children who need them most. Researchers have found that supplying free lunches to students in rural primary schools not only made them healthier, it raised their test scores. During the academic school year of 2009-2010, researchers in Senegal did an experiment.
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    Students serve as teachers in anti-bullying lessons
    Arizona Daily Star
    Like many middle school students, the seventh-graders in Dana Richards' language arts classes have either witnessed or been victims of bullying. The Anza Trail School in Arizona students are aware of the various forms of harassment, from verbal and physical to cyberbullying, but a class project allowed them to delve deeper into the topic and educate their classmates. The students created videos, websites, PowerPoint slide shows and brochures to reveal tips on how to deal with bullies, present statistics on those affected by bullying and conduct interviews with people who have faced harassment.
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    Fired for word: 'Negro' in Spanish class
    The Christian Science Monitor
    One of the first lessons one learns in English class is that context is everything. The same holds true in Spanish. Take the case of Petrona Smith. She says in a lawsuit that she was fired from teaching at New York's Bronx PS 211 in March 2012 after a seventh-grader reported that she'd used the "N" word, according to The New York Post. 'Negro.' Smith doesn't deny using the word. But she argues that everyone uses it, when speaking Spanish. She was teaching the Spanish words for different colors, and the color "black" in Spanish is "negro." She also taught the junior high school students, in this bilingual school, that the Spanish term for black people is "moreno." And by the way, Smith, who is from the West Indies, is black.
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    TRENDING ARTICLES
    Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

        New leaders don't have to 'fly solo' (Education Week)
    Teachers were heroic protectors (USA Today)
    Should teachers be trained like doctors and lawyers? (TakePart)
    Common Core promises new tests. Will they be better than the old ones? (The Christian Science Monitor)
    To encourage boys' reading, look to book clubs (Omaha World-Herald)

    Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




    5 interesting tidbits in new Census school finance data
    Education Week
    The headlines from the U.S. Census Bureau's 2011 school finance data release focused on per-pupil spending, which dropped for the first time in nearly 40 years. But this school finance report is full of other interesting data as well.
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    House committee targets education funding
    eClassroom News
    Republicans controlling the House of Representatives pressed ahead May 21 with a plan to slash spending on certain domestic programs — including education — far deeper than the cuts these departments already face under a painful round of automatic austerity. Military Construction/Veterans Affairs, Homeland Security and the Pentagon would be spared under the plan approved by the House Appropriations Committee on a party-line vote, but total funding for education, health, and labor programs would absorb a cut of 18 percent below fiscal year 2013 levels adopted in March.
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    Navajo schools lose funding due to sequestration cuts
    NPR
    When Congress enacted the across-the board budget cuts known as the sequester in March, they cut $60 million for American Indian schools across the country. Since people living on reservations don't pay state property taxes, the schools heavily depend on federal aid. For the Navajo Nation that means larger class sizes, fewer school buses and putting off building repairs.
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    Teaching students better online research skills
    Education Week
    Sara Shaw, an elementary school teacher in Avon, Mass., realized she needed to teach online research skills several years ago when her students kept turning in projects riddled with misinformation.

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    Sorting kids at school: the return of ability grouping
    Desert News
    A new report shows that ability grouping in schools is on the rise, and prior research shows that teaching students in groups of like ability improves success for low and high achievers. There are important caveats, though.

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    10 keys to a successful school iPad program
    eSchool News
    It seems that every school is considering purchasing iPads these days, and Apple has reported that iPad sales to schools are currently outpacing MacBook sales by a very large margin.

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    Connecticut leads the way on protecting children
    ED.gov Blog (commentary)
    Arne Duncan, secretary of the U.S. Department of Education, writes: "At a town hall meeting last week on school safety at the Classical Magnet School in Hartford, I got to hear firsthand how Connecticut is leading the nation in adopting common-sense solutions to reduce gun violence and improve school safety. In the aftermath of the massacre at the Sandy Hook Elementary School last December, the courage and resilience of teachers, parents, children, and communities in the Newtown area has been nothing short of remarkable."
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    Louisiana to push ahead with paying private firms to teach kids
    Reuters
    Louisiana's schools chief vowed to push ahead with a plan to let students take classes from private firms and nonprofits at taxpayers' expense, despite a legal setback and objections from some educators. The Course Choice plan, which goes far beyond any other U.S. school program in letting families customize a child's education, had been thrown into doubt after the state Supreme Court ruled that Louisiana could not divert money meant for public schools to private organizations.
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    Texas lawmakers pass budget restoring money cut from schools
    Reuters
    Texas lawmakers gave final approval to a two-year budget that restores money cut from schools in 2011, adds funds for mental health services and calls for an 8.3 percent increase in state spending over the previous cycle. The Republican-majority House voted, 118-29, to send Gov.Rick Perry the $94.6 billion spending plan for 2014-2015. The Senate, which also has a Republican majority, approved it on a 27-4 vote. The total budget, including federal funds, is $196.9 billion, a 3.7 percent increase.
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    Court reverses Lobato, finds Colorado school funding constitutional
    The Denver Post
    The Colorado Supreme Court has found the state's system of funding public schools to be constitutional, handing a bitter defeat to plaintiffs in the so-called Lobato case and raising billion-dollar questions about the direction of school finance. The 2005 lawsuit, filed by individuals from the San Luis Valley and later joined by districts across the state, contended that Colorado doesn't provide a constitutionally mandated "thorough and uniform" system of public education. A trial court agreed, but the Supreme Court, on a 4-2 vote, overturned that decision. It found that the current finance system is, in fact, "rationally related" to the thorough and uniform standard.
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    Principals at destroyed Oklahoma schools recount tornado
    Education Week
    While May 20 at Briarwood and Plaza Towers elementary school in the Moore, Okla., school district started off in a normal way, with students gathering for morning meetings to sing songs, hear announcements and honor students for academic accomplishments, there was one thing that was starkly different. Briarwood principal Shelley McMillin had to confront livestock. McMillin dutifully kissed a sheep, a woolly gesture third-grade students had earned by accumulating so many Accelerated Reader points. If only that's where the day's excitement had ended.
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    New learning standards spur debate in Michigan
    Grand Haven Tribune
    In 2010, Michigan's State Board of Education adopted the Common Core State Standards benchmarks in reading, writing and math, which 44 other states have adopted. The standards, developed by the National Governors Association and Council of Chief State School Officers, are designed to provide clear goals for teachers, boost student performance and allow for educational cooperation and comparison among states.
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    Make an impact on Principal — become an editorial advisor
    NAESP
    NAESP is seeking candidates for its editorial advisor board. Editorial advisors provide feedback on the magazine, write book reviews, suggest themes or articles, and contribute to conference news. Editorial advisors are asked to make a three-year commitment. If you are a current principal and interested in becoming an editorial advisor, the deadline to apply is May 31.
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    Don't miss Jeans and Jerseys at the 2013 NAESP Conference
    NAESP
    Join NAESP for Jeans and Jerseys, a star-studded bash to kick off the 2013 NAESP Conference. On Wednesday, July 10 at 7:30 p.m., the Center Club in Baltimore will come to life with music, food, drinks, a silent auction, and a book signing with bestselling author James Patterson. Proceeds from the event will support NAESP's student leadership programs. Visit the conference website for more information about the event, along with other exciting preconference festivities.
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