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Report: Most districts have deployed mobile tech, want more
THE Journal
Eighty-two percent of districts are "highly interested" in launching or expanding a 1:1 technology initiative within the next two years, according to a new report from Amplify and IESD. The report, the "2014 National Survey on Mobile Technology for K-12 Education," also found that the number of districts reporting that at least one-quarter of their schools had deployed mobile devices had risen to 71 percent, up from 60 percent in 2013. Forty-four percent of districts surveyed said that approximately 75 percent of their schools had deployed mobile technology.
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Cultivating teacher leaders at your school
By: Brian Stack (commentary)
I recently had an engaging conversation with one of my teachers. After just two years in the classroom, she was at a point where she was looking for ways to take on leadership roles. Our school, like many around the country, is transforming the way we look at teaching and learning. Our conversation really got me thinking. Through our transformation process, I need to cultivate teacher leaders more than ever before. Teacher leaders are the backbone of our work, and we as school administrators can't do it alone. Let's take a look at some innovative efforts that are changing schools around the country.
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Common Core test experts explain ELL and special education supports
Education Week
The two experts closest to the development of features designed to make the new Common Core assessments accessible to all students, including English language learners, appeared on edweek.org yesterday to answer questions from the field. Magda Chia, the director of system design and support for underrepresented students for Smarter Balanced; and Tamara Reavis, a senior adviser for assessment, accessibility, and equity at PARCC; spent an hour taking questions and explaining the range of supports and features for students with disabilities and English language learners.
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Study finds reading possible despite low IQ
Disability Scoop
For students with intellectual disability, functional skills are often prioritized over academics, but a new study finds that children with low IQ are capable of learning to read. With persistence and specialized instruction, researchers found that kids with mild to moderate intellectual disability can read at a first-grade level or better. They say the results could have life-changing implications for thousands of students with low IQ.
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Common Core State Standards face a new wave of opposition
The New York Times
Opposition to the Common Core, a set of reading and math standards for elementary, middle and high school students that were originally adopted by 46 states and the District of Columbia, has gathered momentum among state lawmakers in recent weeks. The governors of Oklahoma and South Carolina are considering signing bills to repeal the standards and replace them with locally written versions. In Missouri, lawmakers passed a bill that would require a committee of state educators to come up with new standards within the next two years.
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5 AV trends transforming the Common Core
eSchool News
Much of the talk surrounding the Common Core State Standards has been about the content being taught, but few are discussing the audio hardware that districts need to have in place to deliver this content to students. AV equipment is a small but integral component for successfully implementing the Common Core. Both PARCC and Smarter Balanced assessments require students be provided with headphones, and these pieces of technology also assist educators in delivering instruction.
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Do educators really need blog posts?
Edutopia (commentary)
Way back in the 20th century when a collaborative-spirited administrator would come across a helpful article in an education journal about some new methodology or pedagogy, he or she would share it with the faculty — if possible. The methods of collaboration were not as sophisticated or convenient as today. Often the replication of an article fell to a typist who could type on a mimeo sheet for the purpose of reproducing copies for the members of the faculty. Later in the century, the thermo fax enabled copying the document directly to a duplicating sheet.
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IT and education are like peanut butter and jelly
EdTech Magazine
Dr. Chad A. Stevens, a contributor for EdTech Magazine, writes: "I often hear about the great divide between information technology and educational technology. IT workers sometimes lock down devices, which makes them difficult to use in the classroom. They do this without thinking about the potential impact on the classroom, worrying only about protecting the devices — even though there are tools that can better manage devices, and the workers could collaborate more closely with instructors to make sure access is appropriate."
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    What makes a great school leader? (Edutopia)
The 3 questions to ask in any classroom (NPR)
States forge ahead on principal evaluation (Education Week)
States struggle to make school report cards useful (U.S. News and World Report)
Starting off right: States are investing in early education (By: Archita Datta Majumdar)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


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3 ways digital badges are used in education
eSchool News
As children, our accomplishments were recognized with trophies, plaques, a pat on the back or cloth badges sewn on to a Girl Scout or Boy Scout sash. In high school and college, we received diplomas and began to fill up resumes and LinkedIn profiles with job qualifications and experience. But what if there was a way to help acknowledge educational experiences that happen outside of the classroom and recognize valuable skills such as leadership or collaboration?
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Helping children be healthy — the science of school lunch
Medical News Today
In terms of ambience, Charlotte Central's cafeteria is — well, conjure up your own elementary school lunch experience. There's more than one reason to run to recess. But on a recent visit to observe a group of researchers from UVM's Johnson Lab, the lunch ladies were serving up something more likely to be found on a restaurant menu: risotto with mushrooms and peas. It's the result of a host of programs by schools around Vermont to offer more tempting choices — with locally sourced ingredients when possible, including herbs and vegetables from the playground garden — and to get children to eat more healthfully. But is it working?
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword SCHOOL LUNCH.


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5 ways to influence change
Connected Principals Blog (commentary)
George Couros, a contributor for Connected Principals Blog, writes: "In a time where the only constant in education is change, people involved with education need to become 'change agents' more now than ever. You can understand pedagogy inside out, but if you are unable to define 'why' someone should do something different in their practice, all of that knowledge can be ultimately wasted. People will take a “known good” over an 'unknown better' in most cases; your role is to help make the unknown visible and show why it is better for kids."
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Is all this student data changing the way teachers teach?
MindShift
With so much access to student data these days, teachers are experimenting with different tactics, and figuring out what's working and what's not. As with most scenarios using education technology, it's a mixed bag. But questions of privacy aside, how it's used depends on a variety of factors in each school and in each teacher's classroom. Some teachers are embracing student data to inform their teaching, while others believe there's a risk of an over-reliance on hard numbers that doesn't take into account the human factor.
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Is the deck stacked against African-American boys in America?
NPR
The numbers are grim. African- American boys are more likely than white boys to live in poverty, and with a single parent. They're also more likely to be suspended from school and land in prison, and less likely to be able to read. But what to do about it? That's the question before My Brother's Keeper, a White House task force created earlier this year. On Friday, President Barack Obama released the team's first 90-day progress report. The $200 million, five-year initiative was announced in February. At its inception, Obama traced the idea for My Brother's Keeper to the killing of Trayvon Martin, the Florida teenager whose death sparked a heated, national debate about race and justice.
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Students' brains might benefit from an extra year in middle school
The Atlantic
The practice of voluntarily delaying school transitions, either by red-shirting kindergarten, repeating twelfth grade, or introducing a gap year between high school and college, is a well-established tradition in the United States. The extra year gives students time to mature athletically, academically, or developmentally. Although kindergarten entrance and the transition from high school to college have long been seen as the ideal times to take an extra year, recently eighth grade has been seen as an opportune time for kids to catch up with — or maybe even gain an advantage over — their peers.
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7 steps in a mobile learning rollout
eSchool News
Successful mobile learning initiatives are more and more prevalent in districts across the nation. And while the same initiative won't necessarily work for two different districts, mobile learning best practices repeatedly prove that successful initiatives share a number of the same steps. Here, eSchool News has outlined seven of those steps. These steps are broadly described, and successful mobile initiatives certainly require much more attention to detail, in-depth planning and continued focus.
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GAO report: Sequestration forced districts to reduce staff, programs
Education Week
The investigative arm of Congress has found that across-the-board federal budget cuts last year forced some school districts to cut academic and after-school programs, scale back professional development, and delay physical and technology upgrades. Those details were part of a Government Accountability Office report looking at how federal agencies, including the U.S. Department of Education, prepared for and implemented the 2013 sequestration. In particular, it looked at the impact of sequestration on Title I and Impact Aid funding.
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State K-12 accountability report: 'To what end are schools being graded?'
Education Week
What makes for robust school accountability systems from states, and where do parents and researchers differ about which states do the best job with those reports? The Education Commission of the States has issued a report trying to answer those questions, and also raise new issues for policymakers to consider as states (in ECS' view) enter the era of "Accountability 5.0."
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TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
7 steps in a mobile learning rollout
eSchool News
Successful mobile learning initiatives are more and more prevalent in districts across the nation. And while the same initiative won't necessarily work for two different districts, mobile learning best practices repeatedly prove that successful initiatives share a number of the same steps.

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read more
5 common myths about school administration
eSchool News
It's not always teachers who face criticism in the U.S. Many school administrators say that misconceptions about their career motivations and the position in general still exist today — and many myths have survived for decades.

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How much teachers get paid — State by state
The Washington Post
How much do teachers across the United States get paid? Here is data, state by state, collected from the National Center for Education Statistics by Jon Boeckenstedt, associate vice president at DePaul University in Chicago.

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Oregon principals work long hours, still need more time, support to focus on improving teaching, they say
The Oregonian
Most Oregon principals work more than 55 hours a week and one-third of them report working more than 60 hours a week, a survey taken by nearly half of Oregon principals shows. Overall, the results paint Oregon principals as feeling trusted to do their jobs well, empowered to make key decisions in their school and blessed with highly qualified candidates to hire as teachers. Coaching teachers, particularly helping weak teachers improve, is the single area where principals say they need the most additional training and support to do their jobs well. Slightly more than half say they need to be able to hire more teachers and other staffers to run their schools right.
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California students sue state seeking more learning time
Reuters
Eighteen California students from seven of the state's lowest performing schools filed a lawsuit on Thursday against the state and top education officials for not having enough time to learn. The lawsuit, filed by the American Civil Liberties Union and pro-bono law firm Public Counsel, cites multiple reasons for insufficient learning time. They include high teacher turnover, teacher vacancies and absences, and so-called "services courses" in which students often perform administrative tasks.
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Apply by June 23 for grant to support arts in your school
NAESP
Strengthen arts education in your school with a 2014 Champion Creatively Alive Children grant. Crayola will award up to 20 grants, which include a $2,500 monetary award and $500 worth of Crayola products. The deadline to apply is June 23.
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Join the world's largest principal book study
NAESP
Make history with NAESP this summer as we undertake the world's largest principal book study! This two-part book discussion will give principals across the country a chance to swap ideas and connect with one another around a common topic: the principles of Dave Burgess's best-seller "Teach Like a PIRATE."
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Before the Bell is a benefit of your membership in the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). For information about other member benefits, visit www.naesp.org or contact us at naesp@naesp.org.

Before the Bell is a digest of the most important news selected for NAESP from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The presence of such advertising does not endorse, or imply endorsement of, any products or services by NAESP. Neither NAESP nor Multiview is liable for the use of or reliance on any information contained in this briefing.

Feedback about an article? Contact NAESP Liaison Meredith Barnett at MBarnett@naesp.org.
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