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Report: Principal support for BYOD initiatives nearly doubled since 2010
THE Journal
The number of principals who say they are unlikely to allow students to use their own mobile devices in class has dropped by nearly half in four years, from 63 percent in 2010 to just 32 percent in 2013, according to the latest report based on Project Tomorrow's annual Speak Up survey. The latest report, "The New Digital Learning Playbook: Advancing College and Career Skill Development in K-12 Schools," relies on online survey responses from more than 400,000 teachers, administrators, students and community members to examine attitudes about technology's role in preparing K-12 students for higher education and the professional world.
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Which states spend the most on education?
USA Today
For the third year, public expenditure per student fell nationwide, according a recent release from the U.S. Census Bureau. Per pupil, school spending totaled $10,608 in 2012, roughly the same amount as the year before. Due to a number of factors, however, spending per student ranged widely among the 50 states. New York was the nation's top spender, at $19,552 per pupil. Utah, on the other hand, spent just $6,206 for every student. Based on the U.S. Census Bureau's latest release on education spending, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed the states that spent the most and least on education per student.
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Most US students won't be taking PARCC or Smarter Balanced tests
Education Week
If states' current testing plans remain steady for a year, only 42 percent of the K-12 students in the United States are likely to take common assessments designed by the two federal funded testing consortia, PARCC and Smarter Balanced. Fifty-eight percent of U.S. K-12 students live in states that have chosen other tests, or haven't yet decided which tests they're using.
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Do education apps keep kids sharp or just plugged in?
Today
Bored kids complaining about how "there's nothing to do" this summer need look no further than their neighborhood app store. Amazon launched a new personalized summer math program through its Kindle earlier this week, joining competing tablet makers Apple and Google, in a race to own the education market and hook kids who will someday grow up and have money of their own. App developers too are taking advantage of the exploding ubiquity of mobile devices, and parental fears of "summer learning loss." Even mobile carriers encourage parents to keep their kids mobile-engaged over vacation.
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Does losing handwriting in school mean losing other skills too?
MindShift
As laptops and tablets become more commonly used as writing tools, many are ready to leave the skill of handwriting behind. Most students will do most of their writing on computers, the thinking goes, so educators should get them started on keyboarding skills early. But psychologist are uncovering some unexpected benefits of learning — not just to write, but to write by hand.
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Beyond the worksheet: Playsheets, GBL and gamification
Edutopia
Game-based learning and gamification are hot topics in education. These terms are often used interchangeably, but they actually describe different phenomena. GBL is when students play games to learn content. Gamification is the application of game based elements to non-game situations. Playing games can give students context for what they are learning. When my students played Angry Birds in the classroom, none of them asked what the purpose of learning x intercepts was. Gamification applications do not necessarily provide a context for students, but they usually give students an indicator of their achievement and progress.
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Tough week for the Common Core
NPR (commentary)
Anya Kamenetz, a contributor for NPR, writes: "A few months ago, when I told friends and media colleagues that I was interested in the Common Core State Standards, the most common response was 'What's that?' Now, it seems, everyone has an opinion about the Core. And right now, opinions about the K-12 learning goals for math and English that have spread nearly nationwide are trending toward the heated. While the school year is winding down, education policy sure isn't. This past week brought a bunch of front-page news on the Common Core."
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Report: Teacher absenteeism can hurt student achievement
U.S. News & World Report
Teachers nationwide are in the classroom 94 percent of the school year, but students may still be getting shortchanged by the more than 1 in 10 teachers deemed to be chronically absent, according to a new report released by the National Council on Teacher Quality. Using data from 40 large school districts across the country from the 2012-2013 school year the NCTQ found that, on average, teachers missed nearly 11 days out of a 186-day school year. This is considered frequently absent. Still, 16 percent of those teachers missed 18 or more days — equivalent to about 10 percent of the school year — and were considered chronically absent, the report found.
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What you need to know about student data security
Scholastic Administrator Magazine
There are two types of school CTOs these days. Those who are worried about the security of their student data, and those who haven't yet realized they should be worried. In less than a year, the issue of who has access to information about your students and what they do with it has gone from mild concern to wild speculation. Parents and politicians have railed against school policies, companies have been thrown overboard, and a federal lawsuit may alter every school's relationship with Google.
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Major policy shifts, economic forces shape the education technology market
Education Week
The multibillion-dollar market for educational technology is in one sense being shaped from the top down — through major policies and economic forces influencing spending across states and school districts. But it's also being fueled from the ground up — by a belief among school leaders and entrepreneurs, that digital tools will give schools the power to customize learning to meet individual students' needs.
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How PD can benefit from international models
eSchool News
While the December 2013 release of the international PISA results prompted U.S. education leaders and policy makers to urge for improvements in teaching and learning, of notable interest was the fact that teachers in other top-performing countries such as China spend more time in professional development than they do in front of their students — the reverse of how the U.S. does PD, experts said. So, what can the U.S. learn from other countries?
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Cultivating teacher leaders at your school (By: Brian Stack)
Study finds reading possible despite low IQ (Disability Scoop)
Common Core State Standards face a new wave of opposition (The New York Times)
What does a good Common Core lesson look like? (NPR)
Schools get road map for improving discipline practices (The Washington Post)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Why aren't more schools using free, open resources?
MindShift
The promise of using technology in school has been to give students more control over their learning, while helping teachers provide tailored instruction to individual student needs. "Personalized learning" has been the common rhetoric driving most one-to-one device initiatives. The stated goal is to make learning more of an individual experience, but many schools have chosen to implement technology programs in fairly regimented ways — for lots of different reasons. Many schools want all students to have the same kind of device, with the same apps pre-downloaded.
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7 tips on navigating device choices in schools
EdTech Magazine
Dr. Chad A. Stevens, a contributor for EdTech Magazine, writes: "I recently began to read the work of Seymour Papert, who some call the 'father of educational technology.' In my research, the following quote stuck with me: 'Why are we still having conferences on computers in education? We don't have conferences on pencils in education.' I find Papert's quote to be particularly compelling when you consider that it was said nearly a quarter-century ago. Now more than ever, some believe a device is the answer to improve educational outcomes."
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Children see improvement in language when they are physically fit
RedOrbit
Physically fit children are not only healthier, they have faster and more robust neuro-electrical brain responses while reading, according to a new study by researchers from the University of Illinois. The findings were published in the Brain and Cognition journal. Although the research doesn't prove that higher fitness directly effects the changes in the electrical activity in the brain, it does offer a mechanism to explain why physical fitness associates closely with improved cognitive performance with a variety of tasks and language skills.
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Common standards for nation's schools a longtime goal
The Washington Post
The notion that U.S. students should share core knowledge is not new. President Dwight D. Eisenhower suggested national academic standards were needed as early as 1959. Presidents George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton both proposed that states voluntarily adopt national standards, efforts that crumbled under charges of federal overreach. By law, the federal government is prohibited from telling states what or how to teach. Over the decades, organizations of educators have developed math, science and English standards, but acceptance by states was scattershot. Some states lacked standards entirely.
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The impact of the 'summer slide'
StateImpact
Ah, the summer slide. It's not your child's playground agenda during their school vacation — it's a term used for the regression of students' skills over their scholastic summer breaks. School summer vacations typically leave U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan a little bit baffled. "Students and teachers work so hard, get to a certain point in June, and too many come back in the fall further behind than when they left," said Duncan. "That just simply makes no sense."
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Kids with no vaccinations clustered in some schools
The Columbus Dispatch
Some Ohio schools might as well have a target painted on the side of the building as far as public-health experts are concerned. In some schools in the state, as many as 1 in 3 incoming kindergartners and newly enrolled older students have parents who oppose vaccines, according to a Dispatch analysis of schools' immunization counts. Vaccine opposition runs high in many parochial and charter schools and in Amish country, but higher concentrations of unvaccinated kids aren't limited to those schools, of course.
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Report: Teacher absenteeism can hurt student achievement
U.S. News & World Report
Teachers nationwide are in the classroom 94 percent of the school year, but students may still be getting shortchanged by the more than 1 in 10 teachers deemed to be chronically absent, according to a new report released by the National Council on Teacher Quality.

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5 common myths about school administration
eSchool News
It's not always teachers who face criticism in the U.S. Many school administrators say that misconceptions about their career motivations and the position in general still exist today — and many myths have survived for decades.

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How much teachers get paid — State by state
The Washington Post
How much do teachers across the United States get paid? Here is data, state by state, collected from the National Center for Education Statistics by Jon Boeckenstedt, associate vice president at DePaul University in Chicago.

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In schools, social media intrudes with bullying
Glens Falls Post-Star
Eleven-year-old Raina Garti felt hurt and upset when someone posted a photo of her in her pajamas to Instagram and wrote mean comments on it. The fifth-grader decided to turn that negative into a positive, however, by helping to promote an anti-bullying assembly coming up next week in Glens Falls Middle School in New York. Garti put up fliers around the school with anti-bullying messages. "Be part of the solution — not part of the problem," she said. This all started back in December when Raina attended a sleepover birthday party at a girls’ house. Some of the girls were snapping photos. Raina thought nothing of it.
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Study finds school salad bars increase meal participation
Chalkbeat Colorado
More kids eat school meals when salad bars are added, according to a recent evaluation of a program that provides free salad bars to schools nationwide. The evaluation of the "Let's Move Salad Bars to Schools" campaign found that 57 percent of schools reported an increase in school meal participation and 78 percent reported using the salad bars every day. Since it launched in 2010, the campaign has donated 3,456 salad bars to schools in 49 states, including 148 in Colorado. Currently, there are 555 schools on the waiting list, including two in Colorado. The free bars are available to any school district participating in the National School Lunch Program.
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2014 NAESP Conference just a month away; Register now
NAESP
There's no other event like the NAESP National Conference and Expo, July 10-12 in Nashville, Tennessee. Only here can you make the contacts, share the ideas, and discover the solutions that will inform your entire school year. Don't let it happen without you! Register today.
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Apply by June 23 for grant to support arts in your school
NAESP
Strengthen arts education in your school with a 2014 Champion Creatively Alive Children grant. Crayola will award up to 20 grants, which include a $2,500 monetary award and $500 worth of Crayola products. The deadline to apply is June 23.
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Before the Bell is a benefit of your membership in the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). For information about other member benefits, visit www.naesp.org or contact us at naesp@naesp.org.

Before the Bell is a digest of the most important news selected for NAESP from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The presence of such advertising does not endorse, or imply endorsement of, any products or services by NAESP. Neither NAESP nor Multiview is liable for the use of or reliance on any information contained in this briefing.

Feedback about an article? Contact NAESP Liaison Meredith Barnett at MBarnett@naesp.org.
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601   Download media kit
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