This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Click here to advertise in this news brief.


Advertisement


  Mobile version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit Jun. 11, 2013

Curriculum    School Leadership   Federal Advocacy & Policy   In the States   Association News   Buy Books   Contact NAESP


Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement


Moving
To Success

Moving To Success embraces the belief that students who become competent movers and are knowledgeable regarding the health-related benefits of being physically active are more likely to lead a physically active lifestyle. 864-680-8471
MORE



 

Advertisement



Obama: All schools should have Internet
USA Today
President Barack Obama found a new line to make the argument that all of the nation's schools should have high-speed Internet. "In a country where we expect free Wi-Fi with our coffee, why shouldn't we have it in our schools?" Obama told students and faculty at a middle school in Mooresville, N.C. Obama toured the school near Charlotte as part of his national jobs tour, and made the argument that the Internet can help teach students the skills needed to secure the work of the 21st century.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  


Advertisement


Gates Foundation looking to make nice with teachers
The Seattle Times
Five years into the second phase of its mission to overhaul America's public schools, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is moving to work more closely with teachers, generating interest but also wariness because of past hostilities.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Governors, state education chiefs discuss improving child literacy
The Washington Post
Governors and education chiefs from nine states said Tuesday that a focus on early-childhood education, the changing dynamic of families and supporting low-income students could help improve literacy across the country. Discussing the nation's literacy crisis at a Washington Post policy forum in the District, the panel of political and education leaders said states need to do more to help children learn to read by the third grade, a key educational milestone at which children shift to "reading to learn." Those who can't read proficiently by third grade are more likely to struggle in later grades.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement
PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  ATTN: NAESP CONFERENCE ATTENDEES

Don’t miss the Standards Plus presentation “How Do I Lead My Staff Through the Common Core Standards Without Making Them Crazy?” Saturday, July 13 from 9-10:15 AM. This interactive session will provide you with information and tools you need to implement the Common Core Standards. LEARN MORE
 


Can Spotify and New York City save music education with technology?
Gigaom
Forget recorders and bongo drums; the classroom musical instruments of tomorrow could look more like GarageBand and Spotify. And it's not necessarily because educators want to familiarize students with technology. It's because, in an age of declining budgets and disappearing school arts programs, technology might be a way to cost-effectively keep and improve music education in the classroom.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Museums open doors to informal math learning
Education Week
Math has a bit of an image problem. It's often seen as hard, abstract — even pointless. The creators of the National Museum of Mathematics in New York City are all about turning that image around and convincing young people that mathematics is cool. "Changing perceptions is our goal," said Cindy Lawrence, the co-executive director of MoMath, as it's quickly become known. "From the minute people walk in the door, we try to highlight the creative side of math: that it's colorful, it's beautiful, it's exploratory, fun and engaging. None of these are words people typically associate with math."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement
Sponsored Content
  • Plan ahead for fall and save on reading and writing programs!
  • Cultivate deep discussion with Fountas & Pinnell’s first full-year curriculum for grades K-8!
  • Save big on Guided Reading grade level sets, specifically correlated to the Common Core!
  • Is your school equipped with powerful writing instruction for next year?
  • Contact a Classroom Books Specialist for free samples & all the info you need for fall!


  • Schools adding time to teach the arts
    Education Week
    The arts — said to be neglected by schools since the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 pressured them to focus on literacy and mathematics instruction — may no longer be side-swiped for other disciplines. Some expanded learning time schools are now using their longer school days not just for additional instruction in math, reading and the like, but for arts education (dance, drawing, theater and music), according to a new report released by the Boston-based National Center on Time & Learning.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


      FEATURED COMPANIES
    Advertisement
    Your Fundamental Solution for Improving Instruction

    "The Fundamental 5 maximizes teacher effectiveness. It is the best instructional system I have ever observed." Robert Brezina, U.S. Academic Decathlon Past President.
    Order now on Amazon.com
    Advertisement
    Safer,Faster, Easier Dismissal Procedures


    ON SALE NOW

    For Educators and Concerned Parents


    CarRider Signs, CarRider Tags, SCoolBus Tags, AfterSCool Tags & Walker Tags and more.
    Click here to learn more now.




    Debating iPads or Chromebooks for 1:1? Why not both?
    THE Journal
    As more school districts consider 1:1 initiatives, they are faced with the decision of which device to roll out. Chromebooks and iPads are two popular choices, but instead of choosing between them, some innovative school districts are deploying both. Spring Lake Public Schools in Michigan, Sioux Falls School District in South Dakota, Winneconne Community School District in Wisconsin, and the Academy for Urban School Leadership, a nonprofit organization that manages 25 Chicago Public Schools, have implemented or plan to implement both iPads and Chromebooks in the classroom.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    Advertisement


    Study: Vision, dyslexia not linked
    HealthDay News
    A new brain imaging study appears to rule out one potential cause of dyslexia, finding that vision problems don't lead to the common reading disorder. The new research could have a wide-ranging impact on the detection and treatment of dyslexia, said senior study author Guinevere Eden, director of the Center for the Study of Learning at Georgetown University Medical Center. The study appears June 6 in the journal Neuron.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    Teacher collaboration, professional communities improve many elementary school students' math scores
    American Sociological Association via Science Daily
    Many elementary students' math performance improves when their teachers collaborate, work in professional learning communities or do both, yet most students don't spend all of their elementary school years in these settings, a new study by UNC Charlotte researchers shows. Collaboration involves teachers working together to promote student achievement. A professional community exists when teachers feel a sense of belonging to a school, take pride in the school, understand and accept the school's mission, and are constantly learning strategies to improve student achievement.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    Advertisement


    Toy gun exchange: Elementary school buys back toy weapons from students
    The Huffington Post
    The number one lesson when it comes to gun safety is that a gun is not a toy. However, there are some cases where guns are, in fact, toys, and one California elementary school is doing its best to keep those toy guns out of the hands of kids. Strobridge Elementary School in Hayward, Calif., is holding a toy gun exchange program where students can trade in their toy guns in for books and the chance to win a new bicycle.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


      PRODUCT SHOWCASES
    Advertisement
    ReadingA-Z.com Makes Reading Fun!

    Improve your students’ reading abilities no matter what language they speak with ReadingA-Z.com! This 27-level reading plan allows students to progress at their own speed while learning with the rest of the class. Thousands of printable and projectable books and support materials. Available in English, British English, Spanish and French.
    Advertisement
    A Complete Reading & Math Diagnostic Assessment Solution

    Based on scientific research, the GRADE and GMADE suite of products provides everything you need to assess, plan, and deliver your focused instruction in reading and math and will lead your classrooms to reportable success. Learn More.
    Advertisement
    Customized Solutions with Students in Mind.

    With more than 60 restaurants, over 65 years of guest service experience in the retail restaurant industry and over 80 food service locations, Piccadilly Food Service has the ability to customize dining solutions that meet the unique needs of your students and faculty.
    Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword TECHNOLOGY.


    Low-income students lag in attendance rates
    Wausau Daily Herald
    If north central Wisconsin students were given a collective grade on how well they showed up for school, they'd get an A-, but students from low-income families lag behind. Local educators say those attendance rates — the number of actual days of attendance divided by the possible days of attendance — are overall very good, but there still is room for improvement. Students from families that qualify for free- and reduced-price school meals, which a measurement of family's economic status, typically rank about 1 percentage to 3 percentage points behind their more affluent peers.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    Advertisement


    June: 5 education grants you don't want to miss
    eSchool News
    School funding difficulties show no sign of abating, and school budgets are stretched to the limit. Many educators and administrators rely on school grants to fund important projects and opportunities for students. During the first week of every month, the editors of eSchool News compile a list of the most current education grants expiring soon — from student fitness to iPads. You don't want to miss out on these school funding opportunities for teachers, students, parents and administrators.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    Why study the learning process if the data isn't used?
    The Huffington Post (commentary)
    One would think the world of education — including educators, decision makers and government education policy generators — would base decisions on grounded research. After all, these are folks who have managed to make their way to a higher order of thinking and graduated with a degree from our educational institutions. Why then is there such a gap between what we know (through research) and what we do (practice/make decisions)?
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    FEATURED ARTICLE
    TRENDING ARTICLE
    MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
    Schools adding time to teach the arts
    Education Week
    The arts — said to be neglected by schools since the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 pressured them to focus on literacy and mathematics instruction — may no longer be side-swiped for other disciplines.

    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    read more
    The great handwriting debate
    The Huffington Post
    Rob Furman, an elementary principal, author and national presenter, writes: "There has been a great deal of discussion around the topic of teaching cursive handwriting in the 21st century."

    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    read more
    States pull back from Common Core
    U.S. News & World Report
    Lawmakers in some states hope to halt the transition to the Common Core State Standards, even as school districts across the country are rolling them out.

    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    read more



    How districts support social networking in schools
    eSchool News
    Despite restricted network access and concerns about student safety, more and more schools are using social networking in classrooms in an effort to give students a more robust digital learning experience. According to a new Edudemic infographic, overall, some of the most popular social networking tools in school include Skype, Facebook and YouTube.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE




    Rival proposals show no clear path to ESEA rewrite
    Education Week
    Lawmakers in Congress introduced three separate pieces of legislation to rewrite the long-stalled Elementary and Secondary Education Act — but none of the measures has bipartisan backing, meaning that there will almost certainly not be a reauthorization this year. All three bills — like the administration's series of waivers under the No Child Left Behind Act — would move away from "adequate yearly progress," the key yardstick at the center of the 11-year-old federal school accountability law. But the similarities largely end there.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    Advertisement


    Lawmakers at odds over NCLB's successor
    eSchool News
    The one-sized-fits-all national requirements of No Child Left Behind would give way to standards that states write for themselves under legislation introduced by senators of both parties, with one key difference: The Republican version of the bill would eliminate the Education Department's role in overseeing the standards and give governors the final say.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE




    Minnesota moves ahead with some Common Core education standards
    Minnesota Public Radio
    As the school year drew to a close, Minnesota parents received a warning that their children may receive lower scores on standardized tests than last year, now that the state has adopted new national benchmarks known as the Common Core State Standards. In a May 30 letter to parents, state Education Commissioner Brenda Cassellius wrote that because Minnesota schools began using more rigorous standards to teach English arts last fall, schools also gave students more challenging tests to measure their progress towards meeting higher expectations.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


      FEATURED COMPANIES
    Advertisement
    Troops to Teachers

    Let a Veteran bring leadership, experience, and maturity to your school. Make a difference in the classrooms of your school and do it for your students hire a Troops to Teacher!
    Contact Troops to Teachers TTT@navy.mil
    Advertisement
    Teacher Evaluations Made Easy!

    Helping hundreds of school districts improve teacher performance, Halogen eAppraisal Education makes teacher evaluations easy and manageable. Book a
    Free Trial of Halogen’s award winning software today.


    New York City principals given more power to oust bad teachers
    TakePart
    Is New York City finally ready for citywide educational reform? Mayor Michael Bloomberg thinks so, and it all has to do with a new teacher assessment system in the country's largest city announced this weekend by the New York state education commissioner. "It gives New York confidence that our schools will be able to give the kids the education they will need going forward," he told The New York Times.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    TRENDING ARTICLES
    Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

        Common Core online practice tests unveiled (Education Week)
    Sandy Hook Elementary School: 6 months later (District Administration Magazine)
    To get students invested, involve them in decisions big and small (MindShift)
    Students can learn by explaining, studies say (Education Week)
    No Child Left Behind: Pass or fail? (The Hill)

    Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




    Two free webinars next week on online resources, reading
    NAESP
    Mark your calendar for two free webinars next week. On Wednesday, June 19, join NAESP for "Using Open Educational Resources to Empower Collaborative Learning Communities." In this webinar, three educators will share best practices for leveraging free, open-licensed resources. On Thursday, June 20, join presenters Patricia Cunningham and James Cunningham for "What Principals Need to Know About Teaching and Learning Reading." Visit NAESP's webinar page to sign up or find information on more upcoming presentations.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    NAESP conference: Just one month away
    NAESP
    This time next month, NAESP's 2013 conference in Baltimore will be kicking off. Don't miss it! We've lined up the rock stars of the education world like Freeman Hrabowski, Adam Sáenz, Michael Fullan, Eric Jensen, Todd Whitaker, Justin Baeder, and more! There'll be 100-plus hot topic sessions, stimulating networking, fun community events, and a special Teacher Day to inspire your teacher leader team. Register and make your travel plans now.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE
     


    Before the Bell is a benefit of your membership in the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). For information about other member benefits, visit www.naesp.org or contact us at naesp@naesp.org.

    Before the Bell is a digest of the most important news selected for NAESP from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The presence of such advertising does not endorse, or imply endorsement of, any products or services by NAESP. Neither NAESP nor Multiview is liable for the use of or reliance on any information contained in this briefing.

    Feedback about an article? Contact NAESP Liaison Meredith Barnett at MBarnett@naesp.org.
    Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601   Download media kit
    This edition of Before the Bell was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here.

    NAESP | 1615 Duke Street | Alexandria, VA 22314 | www.naesp.org | 800-386-2377
    Recent issues
    June 7, 2013
    June 4, 2013
    May 31, 2013
    May 28. 2013



    7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063