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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit June 16, 2015

Curriculum    School Leadership   Federal Advocacy & Policy   In the States   Association News   Buy Books   Contact NAESP


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Should schools schedule more field trips for students?
By: Archita Datta Majumdar
As rising debates about changes in education policies and methods rage all over the country, more school districts are exploring their field trip calendars to incorporate interactive and innovative learning programs. The latest to join the bandwagon is California with its "Local Control Funding Formula," which allows district leaders to collaborate with parents, teachers and students. Other states would do well to follow these new funding rules and initiate this kind of positive enthusiasm.
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When guarding student data endangers valuable research
The New York Times
There is widespread concern over threats to privacy posed by the extensive personal data collected by private companies and public agencies. Some of the potential danger comes from the government: The National Security Agency has swept up the telephone records of millions of people, in what it describes as a search for terrorists. Other threats are posed by hackers, who have exploited security gaps to steal data from retail giants like Target and from the federal Office of Personnel Management.
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Reading, writing, required silence: How meditation is changing schools and students
The Huffington Post
On a Wednesday afternoon in early May, after a full day of studying the Byzantine Empire and sitting through lessons on annotation and critical reading, the sixth-graders in Zsazita Walker's social studies and language arts class were, expectedly, acting like sixth-graders. School was almost over and the classroom, scattered with posters, worksheets and lesson plans, was buzzing with chatty, curious 10-, 11- and 12-year-olds who knew they'd soon be free from class.
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3 ways to be a better digital citizen, online and in real life
eSchool News
Walk down the street, look around in a restaurant, or watch people waiting in line and you'll notice how fully technology has become integrated into our daily lives. Views of technology and its place in society can be seen in movies, television and cultural references. It has become such a part of what we do and who we are that it has come to be defined as a sort of "digital" citizenship. So what describes a digital citizen?
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Why students should read
TeachThought (commentary)
Terry Heick, a contributor for Teach Thought, writes: "Lately, there's something about reading that’s bothering me about how we teach reading and writing. I've written about it before and said a lot of what I say here, but never quite said what I was trying to say because I'm not sure what I really mean. It's got something to do with how schools frame it. Call it "literacy." Sterilize it. Cleave it cleanly from its human contexts until it's a school thing and good for you and you should totally do it and one day you'll be thankful you did."
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Effectively incorporating technology with English learners
By: Erick Herrmann
As the school year comes to a close for students across the United States, some districts are planning and purchasing technology to incorporate into instruction. Purchases for teacher and/or students may include interactive whiteboards, tablets, computers or other devices. Other districts are implementing a "bring your own device" program. In either scenario, districts, schools and teachers should take certain considerations into account when implementing technology.
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School-leader standards to get more revision
Education Week
Amid sharp criticism from experts and practitioners in recent weeks, a key set of professional standards that guide the training and professional development of the nation's school leaders will now explicitly address equity, social justice and ethical behaviors. An earlier draft was chided for downplaying the role of principals and other leaders in addressing those issues.
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Guess who: These people rarely control the education technology budget, but they're expected to make it work
The Hechinger Report
Teachers are the people who must effectively blend high-tech tools into their instruction, but relatively few of them have much say over what classroom technology is purchased. As a result, education technology companies spend a lot of time courting school administrators, because they're the people most likely to decide what to purchase, according to several leaders who track these trends.
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Student teaching key to teacher retention, report says
EdSource
Aspire Public Schools and the San Francisco Unified School District both use a new teachers preparation program that has earned high marks for teacher retention, according to a new report by the American Institute for Research. The report, "A Million New Teachers are Coming: Will they be Ready to Teach?" found that 82 percent of teachers who were trained by Urban Teacher Residency United, which partners with both San Francisco Unified and Aspire, the charter school organization that has 36 schools in California, were still teaching after five years on the job.
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Do you have 21/21 vision?
Edutopia (commentary)
Ken Kay, a contributor for Edutopia, writes: "As I've traveled around the country visiting educators for the last 18 years, I have noticed how challenging it is for leaders to carve out time to focus their stakeholders on the development of future-focused visions. However, dynamic leaders are making this a priority and finding innovative ways to express 21st-century student outcomes."
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How Google play for education fits into K-12 learning
EdTech Magazine
As one-to-one initiatives gain speed, more apps are making their way into the classroom and into teachers' hearts. The Google Play for Education store is one way for teachers to find and download student-focused apps that have an impact on learning. In a recent EdTech webinar, four K-12 educators were asked how they incorporate Google Play into their technology programs.
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Study: Feedback doesn't always help students
Tennessee Chalkbeat
A new Vanderbilt University study challenges the assumption that feedback is always a good thing, at least for student learning. The study, conducted by Emily Fyfe, a doctoral student at Vanderbilt's Peabody College of Education, suggests that once a lesson is taught, immediately telling students if they are solving problems correctly or incorrectly can lead to lower performance on subsequent problems and post-tests. If a student is working on problems before learning the material, however, immediate feedback is helpful.
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Insecticides may affect cognitive development in children
Nature World News
Insecticides may affect cognitive development in children, according to a new study. Pyrethroid insecticides are one of the most commonly used pesticides, with benefits in a variety of sectors including residential pest control, public health and agricultural purposes. They can also be found in many domestic products such as lice shampoo and mosquito repellent. With more toxic compounds such as organochlorides, organophosphates and carbamate having been banned due to health concerns, pyrethroids are now increasingly popular, and considered relatively safe for humans and mammals.
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Study: 'Sesame Street' helped preschool kids in the 1970's perform better in elementary school
Medical News Today
It seems that kids who found their way to "Sesame Street" during the 1960's and 70's were profoundly better off for the experience. Building on early research conducted when the educational program first hit the public airwaves in 1969, economists Melissa Kearney and Phillip B. Levine examined the relationship between the ability to watch Sesame Street and later educational attainment in elementary school in a study published in the National Bureau of Economic Research.
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The constant movement in ADHD may help children think, perform in school
Medical News Today
The constant movement of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder may be distracting — but the fidgeting also may improve their cognitive performance, a study by researchers with the UC Davis MIND Institute has found. The take-away message: The hyperactivity seen in ADHD may help children think. The study of pre-teens and teenagers with ADHD examined how movement — its intensity and frequency — correlated with accuracy on cognitively demanding tasks requiring good attention. It found that participants who moved more intensely exhibited substantially better cognitive performance.
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Study: US millennials know technology, but not how to solve problems with it
Education Week
The U.S. education system isn't adequately preparing students to use technology for problem-solving, according to a newly released analysis, which recommends what public schools and businesses can do to address that problem. Change the Equation, a Washington-based organization promoting science, technology, engineering, and math, or "STEM" studies, looked at how American millennials — the first "digital natives" because they were born after the Internet — fared in an international study of adult skills in 19 countries.
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Researchers: 5 ignored factors affect outcomes for poor children
The Washington Post
School leaders and policymakers trying to improve academic results for disadvantaged children need to look outside the classroom at social and economic conditions that directly affect a child's ability to learn, according to a new report. The paper, written by Leila Morsy and Richard Rothstein of the Economic Policy Institute, a left-leaning think tank, focuses on five factors that new research suggests hinder the achievement of poor children: parenting practices in low-income households, single parenthood, irregular work schedules of parents in low-wage jobs, poor access to health care and exposure to lead.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Shifting a school's culture (Scholastic Administrator Magazine)
Do lazy June school days include too many movies and parties? (The Washington Post)
Research: Quick teacher-parent communications can reduce dropouts (THE Journal)
Kindergartens ringing the bell for play inside the classroom (The New York Times)
11 mistakes schools make when buying charge and storage carts and how to avoid them (K-12 TechDecisions)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


The role of adult mentorship in helping children deal with trauma
The Atlantic (commentary)
Jessica Lahey, a contributor for The Atlantic, writes: "Recently, I read Emily Dickinson's 'Hope is the Thing With Feathers' to my high-school students in order to set up a writing assignment. Dickinson describes hope in terms of a bird that perches in the soul, and the students were to follow Dickinson's example and create their own vision of hope through the use of metaphors. My motive went beyond lessons in grammar and punctuation, to a more pressing goal: to invite hope back into the classroom. This particular group of students had endured more than their fair share of adverse childhood experiences, and as they progressed through their treatment for drug and alcohol addiction, their essays had taken a very dark turn."
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Education Department to Congress: We need to hire more employees
Education Week
School's (almost) out for summer, and the rest of the K-12 world may be heading into the summer vacation season. But the U.S. Department of Education has a ton on its plate, from reviewing NCLB waiver-renewal applications and teacher equity plans to investigating civil rights violations to gearing up for the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act and the Higher Education Act.
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Freedom, not fries? Texas official wants deep fryers back in schools
NPR
A little more than 10 years ago, Texas banned soda machines and deep fryers in public school cafeterias. Now the state's current agriculture commissioner, Sid Miller, wants to do away with that ban. He believes these kinds of restrictions should be in the hands of local school boards — not state regulators. But some students are among those who aren't happy about this idea. Take fifth-grader Austin Tharpe, who recently guided me through the narrow lunch line at Doss Elementary School in Austin. Healthful eating is a priority at the school. Ice cream hasn't been sold in five years. Sodas? Try again. Candy? Not one piece of chocolate is for sale. Tharpe says he doesn't think a soda machine or deep fryer would be welcome.
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4 components of effective vocabulary instruction
NAESP
Vocabulary instruction might be the most studied facet of education because it has implications across the disciplines and subject areas. With all of that research comes just as many methods, strategies and pedagogies. It's enough to confuse even the most seasoned educator. There are, however, some universal truths to how students can best acquire word knowledge. According to Aradhana Mudambi, a principal in the Providence (Rhode Island) School District, these are the four components that are included in any successful vocabulary strategy.
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Register for June 17 webinar on Common Core
NAESP
This engaging session provides participants with practical strategies that will prepare students for the Common Core and other assessments. The "12 Powerful Words" strategy will help students master the nomenclature found on standardized tests. The UNRA(A)VEL Reading/Comprehension Strategy will assist students in mastering the passages found on complex assessments. This webinar is a part of Learning First Alliance's Get it Right campaign on Common Core implementation. Larry Bell, president of Multicultural America, will be presenting on Wednesday, June 17, 4 – 5 p.m. ET.
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