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PD evolves with the Common Core
District Administration Magazine
Over the past two years, elementary teachers in Weston Public Schools in Connecticut have been learning to implement Singapore Math, a highly regarded program that delves deeply into concepts ranging from understanding numbers and length to rounding and adding fractions. Weston's three-day summer institute for high school educators is focused on teaching writing in science, history and social science classes. Elementary teachers in Oregon's Multnomah County are dealing with the challenges of incorporating more informational texts into the school day and getting students to use evidence from those texts in verbal and written reports.
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Study: Teen bullies, victims armed more than other kids
HealthDay News
Teenage bullies and their victims are more likely to carry weapons than kids not involved in these abusive relationships, according to a new research review. With school shootings a concern across the United States, the findings — culled from 45 previously published studies — put a spotlight on the potential link between bullying and subsequent violence, experts said.
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Common Core sparks flood of legislation
eSchool News
Stephen Colbert mocked it. Comedian Louis C.K. called it a "massive stress ball that hangs over the whole school." And lawmakers in state capitols spent countless hours over the past few months debating it. Their target is the Common Core, a set of math and English language arts standards voluntarily adopted beginning four years ago by all but a handful of states. The standards define what students should know and be able to do by the end of each grade.
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Homework 2.0: It's time to upgrade our approach
By: Brian Stack
In the 20th century, each student was assigned the same weekly assignment, because homework was a one-size-fits-all model. The educational community subscribed to research such as that by Walberg, Paschal and Weinstein who wrote about "Homework's Powerful Effects on Learning" in 1985. Fast-forward to today and few would argue the importance of homework. But in today's world, the purpose, amount and type of homework that teachers assign looks vastly different than 20 years ago. If we are to continue to use homework as an instructional tool in our modern world, then we must upgrade to this new understanding of homework — call it homework 2.0.
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Going all in: How to make competency-based learning work
MindShift
New Hampshire is the first state to change its education policies to credit high school students — and soon elementary and middle school students, too — for progressing based on what they've mastered, not the number of hours they spend in school. Known as a competency-based system, the idea is to define the core skills and concepts students should master and only move them forward once they've achieved mastery of every competency rather than their "seat time."
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When students simulate violence in their art
Education Week
Is it OK for young students to portray violence in their art? Elementary art teacher and PhD candidate at the University of Arizona, Shana Cinquemani, addresses that provocative question in a recent piece in Art Education, the journal of the National Art Education Association. She describes doing a portrait photography unit with K-5 students, for which she gave them digital cameras. Many of the photos they produced showed them engaging in "perceived violence and rough-and-tumble play" — pretending to hit, kick, push, and choke each other. One student positioned a rock above another's head.
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This method is helping students excel under Common Core
eSchool News
One of the central goals of the Common Core State Standards was to make education more uniform across the country. There were simply too many differences between the education a child would receive in Massachusetts and the education one would receive in Mississippi, for instance. The disparities also crossed over into testing measures. In response, the two testing consortia, the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers and Smarter Balanced, which were formed by groups of states to administer the new, next-generation assessments, have committed to providing a fair and uniform testing experience for every student nationwide.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword COMMON CORE.


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Bush Institute study says principals need better support
The Dallas Morning News
Effective principals need clear goals, a culture of support and enough leeway to make decisions they deem best for their schools, according to a report by the Bush Institute. Too often districts think they are providing principals what they need when in reality the policies tend to create conflicting priorities, unmanageable workloads and unnecessary obstacles. A group of experts from across the country — including the Wallace Foundation and New Leaders — joined the institute to research how principals can be more effective and to develop a tool kit to help districts work better with principals.
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How flipped classrooms are growing and changing
EdTech Magazine
A new survey shows the flipped classroom model is expanding and changing in K–12 classrooms, with 30 percent more teachers adopting the teaching method since 2012. The data is based on the results of an online survey taken by 2,358 educators that was conducted in February by the Flipped Learning Network and Sophia.org. The flipped classroom concept, pioneered by teacher and author Jon Bergmann, swaps homework time with lecture time, meaning students first listen to or watch a lecture about a topic outside of school before learning more about it in class.
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Children can tell when a teacher commits 'sins of omission'
Medical News Today
Children learn a great deal about the world from their own exploration, but they also rely on what adults tell them. Studies have shown that children can figure out when someone is lying to them, but cognitive scientists from MIT recently tackled a subtler question: Can children tell when adults are telling them the truth, but not the whole truth?
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Which states spend the most on education? (USA Today)
Does losing handwriting in school mean losing other skills too? (MindShift)
Does the way a classroom is decorated affect learning? (The New York Times)
Report: Principals need more autonomy, support from central office (Education Week)
Size matters: Smaller classes spark better learning (By: Archita Datta Majumdar)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


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Cool tools are fun, but learning should come first
EdTech Magazine (commentary)
The Internet is littered with lists of educational apps, Web 2.0 websites, and "cool tools." These lists certainly can help teachers keep up with the latest and greatest websites or apps in education, but what they don't do is help a teacher understand why they should use them or explain the technology skills students will gain from using these tools. Many teachers come to me asking, "There are so many cool websites to use these days — can you help me find a couple and show me how to use them in my class?"
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What's a culture of data, and how can schools get one?
eSchool News
Schools are overflowing with data — attendance records, achievement data, even logs from mobile devices — and the question remains, how can education systems create a culture that uses data to make decisions? Central to the creation of a culture of data are three key structures: technology, process and leadership. All are essential to support the shift to a data-centric culture in education.
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Federal healthy meals regulations present challenges, promise for district food programs
District Administration Magazine
A Chicago suburban district, realizing it would lose more money than it rakes in, opted out of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National School Lunch Program in response to strict, new federal health regulations. But many districts nationwide can't afford to give up federal subsidies, forcing administrators to find ways to encourage students to eat the healthier foods required by the federal rules. The USDA's new Smart Snacks rules, which eliminate junk food in schools and go into effect July 1, are the latest in a slew of health regulations.
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Some Race to the Top 'silver medal' winners behind on promises
Education Week
Three of the four states that won smaller, second-round Race to the Top grants to improve K-12 education — Colorado, Kentucky and Louisiana — seem to be generally sailing along on their plans, according to a series of reports by the U.S. Department of Education. But four other states — Arizona, Illinois, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania — have experienced more-significant delays and course-corrections, the department reported.
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Obama's $120 million school safety plan
The Daily Beast
Video surveillance, school safety officers, concrete barriers and metal detectors are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to preventing shootings in schools. School safety experts suggest the best strategies for preventing school shooting complement those approaches, which they refer to as "target hardening," or making targets more difficult to attack. People like Beverly Kingston, director of the Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence Institute at the University of Colorado Boulder, suggest that halting school violence starts much earlier.
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Some states roll back teacher tenure protections
The Associated Press via The Huffington Post
Even before a judge's scathing ruling against California's teacher tenure policies, the once-sacred protections that make it harder to fire teachers already had been weakened in many states — and even removed altogether in some places. Florida, for example, put all teachers hired after 2011 on an annual teaching contract, which essentially did away with tenure protections. Kansas and North Carolina also are seeking to eliminate tenure or phase it out. The nonpartisan Education Commission of the States, which highlighted the changes in a recent report, says 16 states — up from 10 in 2011 — now require the results of teacher evaluations be used in determining whether to grant tenure.
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How flipped classrooms are growing and changing
EdTech Magazine
A new survey shows the flipped classroom model is expanding and changing in K–12 classrooms, with 30 percent more teachers adopting the teaching method since 2012.

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5 common myths about school administration
eSchool News
It's not always teachers who face criticism in the U.S. Many school administrators say that misconceptions about their career motivations and the position in general still exist today — and many myths have survived for decades.

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How much teachers get paid — State by state
The Washington Post
How much do teachers across the United States get paid? Here is data, state by state, collected from the National Center for Education Statistics by Jon Boeckenstedt, associate vice president at DePaul University in Chicago.

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How state education agencies spend federal education dollars and why
Center for American Progress
Historically, state departments of education, or SEAs, have — for the most part — been compliance-focused organizations that managed federal education policy. Over the past several decades, these agencies have been education policy implementation entities. Today, while their compliance responsibilities have remained, they are taking on more responsibility for education and academic outcomes than ever before, substantially increasing the scope of their work. State leaders and their staffs must distribute federal education dollars and monitor the districts' use of these funds in accordance to regulations set by federal policymakers.
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Weaker teachers leaving schools under New York City's tenure changes
Education Week
After New York City encouraged principals to be more deliberative in awarding tenure, ineffective teachers were more likely to leave schools or the profession voluntarily — to the benefit of students, according to a recently released working paper. Even though the overall percentage of teachers actually denied tenure did not change much, the more-rigorous process appears to have reshaped the workforce — suggesting that changes in practice rather than underlying tenure laws, may bear fruit, said Susanna Loeb, a Stanford University professor and one of the study's authors.
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A troubled trial run for new Common Core tests
The Hechinger Report
A trial run of new online tests in Massachusetts has received mixed reviews from the state's educators. Although some school district officials say they’re confident they'll be able to handle the shift to computer-based testing if it becomes mandatory in two years, others worry that technical problems on the local level will make the results meaningless. In March and May, nearly 70,000 randomly selected students in Massachusetts took the new tests, which are meant to be aligned with Common Core standards now in place in 43 states. Hundreds of thousands of other students in 13 other states were also part of the trial run of the exam, which is known as PARCC, for the multi-state consortium that designed it, the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers.
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Discuss 'Teach Like a PIRATE' in tweetchat tonight
NAESP
Make history with NAESP this summer as we undertake the world's largest principal book study! This two-part book discussion will give principals across the country a chance to swap ideas and connect with one another around a common topic: the principles of Dave Burgess's best-seller "Teach Like a PIRATE." The first chat is today, June 17, at 8:30 p.m. EST.
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Apply by June 23 for grant to support arts in your school
NAESP
Strengthen arts education in your school with a 2014 Champion Creatively Alive Children grant. Crayola will award up to 20 grants, which include a $2,500 monetary award and $500 worth of Crayola products. The deadline to apply is June 23.
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Before the Bell is a digest of the most important news selected for NAESP from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The presence of such advertising does not endorse, or imply endorsement of, any products or services by NAESP. Neither NAESP nor Multiview is liable for the use of or reliance on any information contained in this briefing.

Feedback about an article? Contact NAESP Liaison Meredith Barnett at MBarnett@naesp.org.
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