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Trends and predictions for K-12 classrooms
MindShift
The evolving role of the teacher as facilitator, and hands-on learning experiences that give students agency over their own education are two major trends already taking root in many schools and classrooms, according to the 2014 NMC Horizon K-12 Horizon report. Within three to five years, the authors expect to see increasing focus on open education resources, as well as more experimentation with blended learning models that combine time on the computer with face-to-face instruction.
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Updated standards for educational leaders to be completed in October
Education Week
Updated model standards for educational leaders, which have not been revised during a period of accelerated changes in the roles that principals and superintendents play in districts, are coming this fall. The two national groups behind the updates — the Council of Chief State School Officers and the National Policy Board for Educational Administration — said that they hope the model standards, which were last updated in 2008, will be completed in October.
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7 steps to authentic learning
eSchool News
Why authentic learning? There are so many reasons to choose from, some of the most important being: providing deep purpose for learning, empowering students, providing differentiation and choice options in learning, connecting students to others locally and globally, and allowing opportunities to develop empathy, creativity and innovation skills. While there are many wonderful resources on the Web regarding Problem Based Learning Units and authentic learning, it seems best to boil it down to a common definition teachers can remember. One that has worked is real purpose, real product and a real audience.
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Poll: Nearly half of American adults haven't heard of Common Core Standards
Education Week
Sick of hearing people bicker about the political football called Common Core? You have lots of company. A new poll finds barely half of Americans haven't even heard of the new standards, let alone heard about them nonstop (like we do here in Washington). The MSN/Wall Street Journal poll, conducted by Hart Research Associates and released today, shows that 47 percent of the 1,000 adults surveyed have not heard of the Common Core. Of those who have, only 22 percent said they'd heard a lot about it. The remaining 30 percent said they'd heard "some."
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Can 12 minutes of exercise make a difference for students?
Psych Central
A new study shows that 12 minutes of exercise can improve attention and reading comprehension in low-income adolescents. Researchers at Dartmouth College say these findings suggest that schools serving low-income students should work brief bouts of exercise into their daily schedules. The study, published in Frontiers in Psychology, compared low-income adolescents with their high-income peers. While both groups saw improvement in selective visual attention up to 45 minutes after exercising, the low-income group experienced a bigger jump, according to the researchers.
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The 'common' in Common Core fractures as state support falters
The Hechinger Report
The Common Core's main selling point was that new, shared standards would ensure American students were learning at the same rates across state lines. Common standards — linked to common tests — would tell schools in Illinois how they stacked up against schools in Massachusetts or California. Now, as more states back out of the tests, the "common" in Common Core is threatened. In 2010, 45 states adopted the Common Core State Standards, a set of skills in math and English students should master in each grade.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword COMMON CORE.


Why standardized testing keeps us stuck in the 19th century
eSchool News (commentary)
What parents do not know and our educational leaders do not want you to know is that standardized testing actually hurts children; it does more harm than good to their emotional, psychological and physical well-being. In the 21st century, can't we do better, can't we come up with a new vision of a system of education that actually empowers the full and unique potentials of each child — the whole child?
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How to talk about school shootings with children
Psychology Today
School violence has become a disturbing norm in our daily news. Since the devastating Sandy Hook shooting, 74 more shootings have taken place. Our country's map is literally peppered with these tragedies. With the majority of the shootings taking place in schools, colleges and universities, parents are confronted with a difficult task: how do we talk about violence with our children, and help them cope after these traumatic events?
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Most important summer activity for kids? Not reading, many parents say
The Christian Science Monitor
Despite the importance that parents place on children's summer reading, it often takes a back seat to playing outside or screen time, reports a new national survey of parents with children ages 5 to 11. Eighty-three percent of parents say it is very or extremely important that their children read this summer, but only 17 percent say it is the most important activity — second to the 49 percent who prioritize playing outside, according to the survey of just over 1,000 parents commissioned by Reading Is Fundamental, a literacy nonprofit in Washington.
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Competitive food options become healthier
District Administration Magazine
Competitive foods and beverages sold outside of the federally-reimbursed school meals programs are common in districts across the country. They're sold in vending machines and at snack bars, school stores and fundraisers. But with concerns rising about childhood obesity and other health issues, there has been a push for healthier snacks. Change has been driven by national legislation such as the Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 and the Department of Agriculture's "Smart Snacks in School" nutrition standards for competitive foods and beverages, which was issued in October 2013. These standards limit calories, salt, sugar and fat, and promote snacks that contain whole grains, low-fat dairy, fruits, vegetables or protein as the main ingredients.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Which states spend the most on education? (USA Today)
Does losing handwriting in school mean losing other skills too? (MindShift)
Does the way a classroom is decorated affect learning? (The New York Times)
Report: Principals need more autonomy, support from central office (Education Week)
Size matters: Smaller classes spark better learning (By: Archita Datta Majumdar)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


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Student power
Edutopia (commentary)
The key commodity in education has been knowledge. It's the reason why we built buildings called schools and required children to come from miles around to sit in a room with the knowledge held in teachers' brains and captured between the covers of textbooks. That model has clearly been disrupted or — to be honest — destroyed. (For those traditionalists getting hot under the collar, let me hasten to add that teachers and books are still very important, but in a different way.) When the world's knowledge is not just in teachers' brains but at students' fingertips wherever they are, whenever they need it, shouldn't that change what happens in these places called schools?
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Rethinking rookies: Why are more new teachers quitting early?
Education Writers Association
For decades teaching was considered a stable profession, with many individuals spending their entire careers at the front of the classroom. But the reality of a young teachers entering the teaching profession right out of school and only leaving when they retire is no more. The subject of new teachers, and how long they're staying in the profession, was the focus of a panel discussion at EWA's 67th National Seminar in Nashville last month. Richard Ingersoll of the University of Pennsylvania went through a report he recently published examining the changing demographics of teachers. He says according to the latest Census data, teaching is the most popular occupation in the United States yet the average teacher doesn't stay in his or her job for more than five years.
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Students' 'summer slump' a worry for parents, educators
The Arizona Republic
Schoolkids recently said goodbye to their teachers and went home for an eight- to 10-week break from early-morning alarms, classrooms and homework, but some educators question whether the summer break is too long. For children from middle- and higher-income homes, summer break often means time for camps, family vacation and trips to the public library — activities that can reinforce lessons learned the previous school year.
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How do earlier school times affect young students?
Psychology Today
Vigorous debates have been occurring in school districts across the U.S. regarding whether moving start times for school later in the morning will yield benefits for high school students' academic performance and behavior. Proponents are relying on research and professional opinion (including my own) that suggests high school students may function better cognitively and emotionally at school when they don't have to begin school so early — as early as 7:30 a.m. — or even earlier (e.g. for zero period) and consequently will be better able to get a good night's sleep.
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Later school start should not focus solely on adolescents
Medical News Today
Middle- and upper-class elementary school students in Kentucky demonstrated worse academic performance when they were required to start classes early, compared to peers whose school day started later, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. Researchers led by Peggy S. Keller, PhD, of the University of Kentucky, theorized that earlier school start times would be associated with lower standardized test scores, poorer attendance, more students being left back, lower school rank and school under-performance.
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A case for why K-12 teachers need tenure
The Washington Post (commentary)
Why should teachers have tenure? What, for that matter, is "tenure" anyway? The issue has become a big topic of conversation because of the recent verdict in the "Vergara trial," in which a Los Angeles judge tossed out California statutes giving job protections to teachers. The decision didn't exactly come out of nowhere; school "reformers" have been moving for several years to weaken or eliminate tenure for teachers and other job protections through legislation. The lawsuit — funded by a multimillionaire from Silicon Valley — was a new weapon in the anti-union arsenal and is sure to be replicated in other states, even if Vergara is overturned by an appellate court.
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School gardens effective way to nudge kids toward 60 minutes of daily activity
News-Medical.Net
Planting a school garden into elementary school activities can teach about nutrition while boosting physical activity and exercise. A two-year Cornell University study of 12 elementary schools in New York state finds that children at schools with gardens were more physically active at school than before their schools had gardens. What's more, children who gardened at school were substantially less sedentary at home and elsewhere than their counterparts.
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Study delivers failing grades for many programs training teachers
NPR
The nation's teacher-preparation programs have plenty of room for improvement, according to a new report. A argues that teaching colleges are too lenient in their admissions criteria and have failed to prepare their students to teach subjects like reading, math and science. The study is the group's second in two years. It found that just 17 percent of ed school programs prepare students to teach reading using all five fundamental components of reading instruction. Nearly half of the 907 elementary programs surveyed fail to ensure that candidates are capable STEM — science, technology, engineering and math — instructors.
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Competitive food options become healthier
District Administration Magazine
Competitive foods and beverages sold outside of the federally-reimbursed school meals programs are common in districts across the country. They're sold in vending machines and at snack bars, school stores and fundraisers.

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5 common myths about school administration
eSchool News
It's not always teachers who face criticism in the U.S. Many school administrators say that misconceptions about their career motivations and the position in general still exist today — and many myths have survived for decades.

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How much teachers get paid — State by state
The Washington Post
How much do teachers across the United States get paid? Here is data, state by state, collected from the National Center for Education Statistics by Jon Boeckenstedt, associate vice president at DePaul University in Chicago.

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5 items on Arne Duncan's summer to-do list
Education Week
Summer started, but that doesn't mean that U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and company get to kick back and work on their tans. The department has a long and wonky to-do list for the summer and beyond, including some overdue homework assignments. And some key, still-pending announcements could have big implications for extensions of state's waivers from pieces of the No Child Left Behind Act.
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Bobby Jindal announces huge Common Core shift in Louisiana
The Huffington Post
On the heels of saying he would not be "bullied by the federal government" any longer, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal announced that he plans to pull his state out of the Common Core State Standards Initiative. Jindal issued a series of executive orders calling for the state to come up with "Louisiana standards and a Louisiana test" in place of the "one size fits all" Common Core standards.
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Highlights from NAESP's 'Teach Like a PIRATE' chat
NAESP
Principals from around the country gathered June 17 for NAESP's principal book study chat on the best-selling book Teach Like a PIRATE. Over 200 participants swapped strategies on leading with passion, connecting teachers with tech tools, and delivering high-quality professional development. Read the Storify wrap-up for all the highlights.
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Deadline approaching for arts grant from NAESP and Crayola
NAESP
Strengthen arts education in your school with a 2014 Champion Creatively Alive Children grant. Crayola will award up to 20 grants, which include a $2,500 monetary award and $500 worth of Crayola products. The deadline to apply is Monday, June 23.
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Before the Bell is a benefit of your membership in the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). For information about other member benefits, visit www.naesp.org or contact us at naesp@naesp.org.

Before the Bell is a digest of the most important news selected for NAESP from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The presence of such advertising does not endorse, or imply endorsement of, any products or services by NAESP. Neither NAESP nor Multiview is liable for the use of or reliance on any information contained in this briefing.

Feedback about an article? Contact NAESP Liaison Meredith Barnett at MBarnett@naesp.org.
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601   Download media kit
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