This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.


Advertisement


Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit June 26, 2015

Curriculum    School Leadership   Federal Advocacy & Policy   In the States   Association News   Buy Books   Contact NAESP


Let Kids Fly with ZipKrooz™


ZipKrooz™ brings zip line-like adventure to the playground in an exciting, inclusive and safe way!



 





What you thought about minority students and special education is wrong
U.S. News & World Report
Minority students are significantly less likely than their white peers to be identified as disabled and may lack access to special education services, despite claims they are disproportionately tracked into and placed in such programs, according to new federally funded research. In a report published in the journal Educational Researcher, Paul Morgan of Pennsylvania State University and his colleagues show that racial-, ethnic- and language-minority students are underrepresented in special education. Yet federal efforts still exist to curb what some say is an excessive number of minority students who are identified as having a learning or intellectual disability, speech or language impairment, or as suffering from emotional issues.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




When school's out, millions of kids go hungry
CNN
No more teachers. No more books. No more free lunch. A record 21.7 million American kids get free or reduced-price lunch at school. But when summer vacation starts, the vast majority of them go without this essential, federally funded benefit. Fewer than 4 million kids — or just 18 percent of those in the school lunch program — are fed through the U.S. Department of Agriculture's summer food program. While that's a record number for the 40-year-old initiative, many advocates and government officials say more needs to be done.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Engage all learners: Make students think visually
By: Savanna Flakes
One way to increase student engagement and facilitate deeper learning is to frequently check for student understanding throughout a lesson. Practitioners find many benefits in using frequent assessment techniques to simultaneously check all students' level of understanding. My three favorite technology tools increase student engagement and quickly get students thinking visually so teachers can adjust and differentiate instruction on the spot. All three technology tools are free, teacher-friendly, and the student data can be saved and graphed to facilitate data charts.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT


English class in Common Core era: 'Tom Sawyer' and court opinions
The New York Times
In the Common Core era, English class looks a little different. The Common Core standards, which have been adopted by more than 40 states, mandated many changes to traditional teaching, but one of the most basic was a call for students to read more nonfiction. The rationale is that most of what students will be expected to read in college and at work will be informational, rather than literary, and that American students have not been well prepared to read those texts.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Virtual reality STEM program helps special needs students
eSchool News
On a typical day at Lee Mathson Middle School in East San Jose, California, students can explore the inside of a volcano via a three-dimensional, holographic image. The Mathson students are just completing their first year learning with the zSpace STEM lab, which includes a set of student virtual reality stations and a teacher station, each outfitted with an interactive stylus as well as a wide variety of educational software ranging from science and physics to engineering. Virtual-holographic images can be “lifted” from the screen and manipulated with the stylus.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement
PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  READY-TO-TEACH INTERVENTION

Have you identified students that are not proficient with the new grade level standards? Standards Plus® Common Core Intervention makes it easy to target, teach, and scaffold the prerequisite skills your students are missing.

DOWNLOAD SAMPLE LESSONS
 


Point of entry: Poetry in the classroom
Edutopia
Since beginning times, almost every history and culture has celebrated the beauty of poetry. Epics such as the Iliad and Odyssey, the Epic of Gilgamesh, and Beowulf celebrated man's struggles, while Shakespearean sonnets captured the exquisiteness of poetry. Edgar Allen Poe credits poetry for being the "rhythmical creation of beauty in words." With such accolades, one cannot ignore the importance and enrichment that poetry brings to curriculum. However, poetry is so much more than meter and rhyme. The versatility of this medium lends itself to any lesson, any grade level, and every student.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Why are American schools slowing down so many bright children?
The Washington Post
Vicki Schulkin, a Northern Virginia parent, knew her son Matt was bright but did not think this was a problem until some of his teachers began to bristle at the erratic working habits that sometimes accompany intellectual gifts. "In fourth grade, his English teacher told me early in the semester that he didn't belong in her high-level class because he wasn't completing all of his homework," Schulkin said. That teacher changed her mind after he showed great creativity in a poetry assignment, but other instructors were less understanding.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT




Football or music? What's the best K-12 investment?
Education Week (commentary)
In a perfect world, all high school activities would be fully funded. But to educators struggling to find the financial means to establish and pay for educational priorities, it is clear that we do not live in a perfect world. Today's schools are subjected to growing pressures from increased academic standards and the expectation that they will provide all of their students with an education worthy of the 21st century. These demands must be met, moreover, in a climate of sharply declining resources. The world is changing at breathtaking speed, and the challenges inherent in responding to that change are daunting. So, too, are the economic stresses on schools.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Back-to-school spending seen rising, but...
CNBC
A National Retail Federation poll finds that 29 percent of households with children ages 6 to 17 plan to spend more on back-to-school shopping this year — up from 24 percent in 2014. That jump is mirrored by an expected increase in spending on college-bound students, with the federation results finding that 30 percent of households with a child or dependent attending college this fall plan to spend more. That's an increase of 7 percentage points. But there's a catch.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement
PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Special Discount for NAESP Members!

As a member of NAESP, you could qualify for a special discount on car insurance with GEICO. Simply go online or call 1-800-368-2734, to complete a simple, no-obligation rate quote. Don’t forget to mention your NAESP membership to see how much you could save with your special member discount.
 


Students pumped up over fitness rooms
Education World
Stairmasters and bicep curls are not just for adults anymore. Some schools have opened fitness rooms where students exercise and track their progress. Students' enthusiasm is drawing in parents and community members as well. Circuit training for second graders? Treadmills for tweens? Not as far-fetched as one might think. Some schools have found that bringing in quality fitness equipment and integrating cardio and circuit training into physical education classes can get youngsters excited about working out.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Maximizing your education apps
District Administration Magazine
Getting the right education apps into classrooms isn't as easy as reading reviews, doing a quick download and making a link available to staff. Because there isn't a standard rating system to verify whether an app will live up to its educational claims, there's no single best approach to matching student needs with new programs. Some CIOs and educators have cobbled together review systems for their districts. Many share the same concerns about apps — efficacy, privacy, security and support, says Bob Moore, director for CoSN's privacy initiative. But he doesn't know anyone who has balanced all of the issues while also meeting state regulations and district standards.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keywords TECHNOLOGY.




Glued to the screen: A 3rd grade class where kids spend 75 percent of the day on iPads
The Hechinger Report
When the 24 third-graders in Morgan Mercaldi's class arrive at the Jackson Avenue School every morning, they take their iPads out of their backpacks and put them on their desks. The tablets will remain there, or in hands and laps, until the children put them in their packs to take them home. Last year Mercaldi had her students stash the iPads away when they weren't using them. But she has abandoned that. "Putting them away serves no purpose. We use them constantly," Mercaldi says.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Year into Common Core, teachers lament lack of materials
The Associated Press
The learning standards were new. The textbooks were not. So curriculum director Tammy Baumann and her team took the books apart, literally. Then they rearranged lessons, filled in holes with outside material and put it all together in what will be the K-2 math curriculum in the fall at her district in East Lansing, Michigan. It was a time-consuming but necessary response, Baumann said, to what appears to be a near-universal lament of teachers as they page through textbooks and websites: a lack of high-quality teaching materials aligned to the Common Core Learning Standards that have been adopted by most states.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  FEATURED COMPANIES
Advertisement
The Fundamentals for Teaching Smarter

"The Fundamental 5 improves instruction. The power of these practices will transform classrooms and schools," E. Don Brown, NASSP past president. Order now at Amazon.com
Transform Your Classroom Transition Time

Bring some fun into your class transition time with Quick Connection Cards. Choose from 200 cards your students are sure to love. Order now.




Congress gets a failing grade on education policy
U.S. News & World Report
Since 2007, Congress has struggled to reauthorize No Child Left Behind, a George W. Bush-era education law that governs how dozens of federal education programs are funded and began an era of annual standardized testing in public schools. While lawmakers in the past have been unable to pass an update because of clashes over finances, school choice and federal oversight, Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., has made updating this law and the Higher Education Act a priority.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Education groups to Congress: Please get rid of No Child Left Behind, already
The Washington Post
Enough, Congress! Time to finally get rid of No Child Left Behind. That's the message that the nation's two largest teachers unions and eight other major education groups, including the National PTA, are planning to deliver at a news conference. They want the Senate to vote on a bill to revise No Child Left Behind, the long-expired and widely reviled federal education law.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Education Department approves ESEA flexibility renewal for 7 states, leaving only 3 to be decided
iSchoolGuide
The U.S. Department of Education announced that 7 more states received multiple years of continued flexibility from provisions of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act — also known as No Child Left Behind — leaving only 3 states that submitted requests for ESEA flexibility to be decided. Georgia, Hawaii, Kansas, Missouri, Nevada, New York, West Virginia and the District of Columbia all received ESEA flexibility. This means the Department granted flexibility and approved waivers for 42 states, Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia from the burdens of the existing law in order to support improved achievement in schools.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Beating the odds
Scholastic Administrator Magazine
Located directly between New York and Boston sits a small manufacturing city whose 60,000 citizens believe in their public schools and are searching for a new identity. More than 65 percent of Meriden's 9,000 students come from minority backgrounds and over 70 percent qualify for free or reduced-price lunch. The city's increasing poverty rates and a decreasing tax base mean that the local school system has gone five years without a budget increase. Despite these hurdles, the Meriden Public Schools' central office leadership team and 1,000-plus staff members have created new programs, infused technology into all schools, and partnered with foundations to boost learning for all students.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Reading, writing, required silence: How meditation is changing schools and students (The Huffington Post)
Why students should read (TeachThought)
Researchers: 5 ignored factors affect outcomes for poor children (The Washington Post)
Teaching handwriting in early childhood (District Administration Magazine)
Building lifelong readers: Do reward systems help? (Education Week)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Schools seek balance for cellphones in class
The Boston Globe
After 20 years of teaching, Miriam Morgenstern is calling it quits. The high school history and ESL teacher is starting an educational nonprofit, although that's not the only reason she's leaving the classroom. Another is her frustration with students and their cellphones. The texting, tweeting and Snapchatting during class time are "an incredible distraction, and makes it much more difficult to teach," she said. "It's pretty hard to compete with a very funny YouTube video." It is the most vexing issue of the digital age for teachers and administrators: What to do about students' cellphones?
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Now on NAESP Radio: How artistic expression can revolutionize learning
NAESP
Erik Wahl, inspirational artist and speaker at this year's annual conference in Long Beach, has a unique understanding of how art and education are intertwined. In the latest installment of NAESP Radio, Wahl sat down with NAESP Executive Director Gail Connelly to discuss his take on creativity's role in learning.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Leadership for effective change
NAESP
Change theory refers to a pathway of steps to advance short- or long-term goals. It’s the process of moving an organization to improve through a complex web of activities. School principals have to take account of all the factors that would influence any changes that are necessary for their school. Some of these factors are moving targets, so creating the conditions in the environment to embrace change takes confidence, skill and tremendous courage. As a school leader puts into place a quality process for their team to work in new and innovative ways, she must have an unwavering focus on the desired goals and outcomes.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
 


Before the Bell is a benefit of your membership in the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). For information about other member benefits, visit www.naesp.org or contact us at naesp@naesp.org.

Before the Bell is a digest of the most important news selected for NAESP from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The presence of such advertising does not endorse, or imply endorsement of, any products or services by NAESP. Neither NAESP nor Multiview is liable for the use of or reliance on any information contained in this briefing.

Feedback about an article? Contact NAESP Liaison Ned Colbert at EColbert@naesp.org.
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601   Download media kit
This edition of Before the Bell was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here.

NAESP | 1615 Duke Street | Alexandria, VA 22314 | www.naesp.org | 800-386-2377
Recent issues
June 19, 2015
June 16, 2015
June 12, 2015
June 9, 2015



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063