This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.


Advertisement


Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit June 30, 2015

Curriculum    School Leadership   Federal Advocacy & Policy   In the States   Association News   Buy Books   Contact NAESP


Let Kids Fly with ZipKrooz™


ZipKrooz™ brings zip line-like adventure to the playground in an exciting, inclusive and safe way!



 





Report: Federal education funding plummeting
U.S. News & World Report
Over the last five years, Congress has cut federal funding for K-12 education by nearly 20 percent, about five times more than overall spending cuts, according to a new report. In an analysis of the federal budget released Wednesday, the bipartisan advocacy organization First Focus found federal spending that affects children — including funding aimed at preventing child abuse and neglect, for housing allocated to children, and for programs targeted toward homeless youths, as well as education funding — has dropped 9.4 percent since 2011, when federal stimulus funds ran out. Overall federal spending dropped 4 percent in the same time.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




Trauma is a hidden cause of academic struggles for many in DC, report finds
The Washington Post
Children in the District are disproportionately exposed to traumatic experiences, including poverty, homelessness and gun violence, that affect their ability to learn, a new report says. But schools can help them by training teachers and employees to be responsive to their emotional needs, according to a report by D.C. Children's Law Center. "Education reforms in the District will not fully succeed if schools do not address the trauma that students bring with them to class," the report says.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Conquering math anxiety
Scholastic Administration Magazine
Math is a lot less scary when you have a "fearless frog" at your side. To help her students feel less anxious about math, Jennifer Laib used a toy stuffed frog to talk about math fears. The K-8 math specialist at Driscoll School in Brookline, Massachusetts, asked second-grade students what it meant to be "fearless" in math. Students offered up concepts like "Ask questions" or "Believe you can do it." When students modeled those fearless traits, they were allowed to hold the fearless frog. The result: Kids were excited at the prospect of learning from their mistakes in math instead of fearing them.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT


Simple music integration for primary classrooms
Edutopia
Today, we're sharing five easy ways for primary teachers to integrate music into their classrooms. Each activity is specifically designed for individuals of all backgrounds and abilities, and none require musical training or experience. So why use music in your primary classroom? Well-designed music activities can deepen and reinforce knowledge and skill development across a wide range of subjects. Music is engaging, fun, and can motivate even the most detached students.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Wanted: More solutions for solving the homework gap
The Hechinger Report
There are just a few hundred students at the public schools in Saint Paul, Arkansas, a speck of a town nestled north of a national forest. Many of these children don't have an Internet connection at home, the principal of Saint Paul schools, Daisy Dyer Duerr, said. An after-school program established here three years ago here provides an Internet connection, enrichment lessons and transportation home. Children who sign up stay for three hours after school, she said.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement
PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Special Discount for NAESP Members!

As a member of NAESP, you could qualify for a special discount on car insurance with GEICO. Simply go online or call 1-800-368-2734, to complete a simple, no-obligation rate quote. Don’t forget to mention your NAESP membership to see how much you could save with your special member discount.
 


The customer is not always right: A case for teacher autonomy in the classroom
By: Debra Abrams
According to both Immigration and Customs Enforcement and English Language Program requirements, students are supposed to be "active learners." In reality, many come and go at will. There may be all sorts of reasons behind their behavior: Perhaps, because their countries or parents are sponsoring them, the "students" have no vested interest in their education. Perhaps, as is the case where I worked until recently, it is because administrators equate students with customers who are to be served, and as businessman Harry Selfridge asserted, "the customer is always right."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Relational reasoning shows how kids think without thinking
Psychology Today
Berkeley psychologist Alison Gopnik showed kids a rectangular box that played music. Kids turned it on by placing the right pair of blocks on top. For some kids, any two different blocks would turn on the music box and for other kids, any two same blocks would start the music. Gopnik showed them how it worked, demonstrating a pair of blocks (same or different) that made the box play music and also a pair of blocks that left the box silent. She did it again, placing correct and incorrect pairs of blocks onto the music box, which played or didn't play music.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT


Steps to help low-income students direct their own learning
MindShift
When Susan Wolfe, an elementary school teacher in Boise, Idaho, asks her class the qualities of a good student, kids often list things like: taking responsibility for themselves, doing homework, being good communicators. By focusing on the what the students believe — instead of what she could dictate to them — Wolfe applies techniques of student-centered learning, which she has embraced throughout her 18-year teaching career working almost exclusively in Title I schools.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Study: Classroom lessons help stressed-out students cope
Education Week
Despite some reports of a population-wide decline in stress since 2007, research over the past few years has shown that young people still lead the pack in average stress levels. A 2014 American Psychological Association survey, for example, found that school-age teenagers had markedly high levels of stress, with 30 percent or more reporting feeling overwhelmed, depressed, fatigued, tired or sad. Those high-stress levels correlate with a medley of health concerns, including overeating, loss of sleep, and lack of exercise, according to the APA.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Stop Bullying/Help Prevent Suicide

Learn more about these new online training programs to help improve the climate and culture in your schools. Based on the movie, Contest, Stand Up Say No to Bullying teaches students how to handle conflict and bullying. Signs Matter helps teachers and administrators identify students who may be contemplating suicide. You can help save lives.
 




Licensing group unveils model ethics code for educators
Education Week
A newly released code of ethics for teachers could help provide some clarity across the mishmash of state rules.The National Association of State Directors of Teacher Education and Certification last year convened a task force to draft the code, with support from the University of Phoenix, ETS and the National Network of State Teachers of the Year. Now, you can read the final version. Why the need for such a document? Well, NASDTEC notes that, unlike with other professions, every single state has its own measures for teacher misconduct. Usually, they're set in state code (in due process statutes, for example) or in other teacher standards.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Analysis finds 23 percent of children are victims of cyberbullying
Medical News Today
Recent reports suggest that 95 percent of American teenagers use the Internet, with 85 percent of this group using social media. More than half of adolescents were also found to log in to a social media website more than once a day, with 22 percent logging in to their favorite social media portal more than 10 times each day. Because adolescents are at a stage in their development when they are vulnerable to peer pressure and have limited capacity to self-regulate, there is concern over the potential risks of social media use among this group, including the potential for cyberbullying, online harassment and privacy issues.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




5 devices for K-12 one-to-one initiatives
EdTech Magazine
Texas's Leander Independent School District started down the one-to-one computing path by talking first to curriculum staff and teachers to learn more about the tools their students needed for more effective and engaging digital learning. Scott Monroe, Leander's executive director for IT, says such computing devices offer teachers and students access to the Internet and numerous online educational tools and applications. Because math, science and language arts typically have different needs when it comes to device function, the district opted for a convertible notebook from Lenovo.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keywords TECHNOLOGY.


Survey: 93 percent of teachers believe that personal devices connect students to real-world learning
THE Journal
A recent national survey from University of Phoenix College of Education found that 93 percent of K-12 teachers believe that personal tech devices can link classroom learning to real-world activities, and 89 percent expect they will be used in most classrooms in the next five years. The survey of more than 1,000 K-12 teachers from around the country was conducted online by Harris Poll.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  FEATURED COMPANIES
Advertisement
Your Fundamental Solution for Improving Instruction

"The Fundamental 5 maximizes teacher effectiveness. It is the best instructional system I have ever observed." Robert Brezina, U.S. Academic Decathlon Past President.
Order now on Amazon.com
Fun Ways to Connect Students

Quick Connection Cards (Pre-K-2nd or 3rd-6th) are the perfect tool for teachers to build positive peer relationships. Great for class transitions too! Order now.




Schools ask for more flexibility in school lunch regs
The Hill
School districts were back before lawmakers to ask for more flexibility in the first lady's prized healthy school lunch regulations, which they say have made school lunches unappealing. Though the regulations are well-intended, Rep. Todd Rokita, R-Ind., chair of the House Education and the Workforce Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary and Secondary Education, said states and schools are struggling.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Study: Nevada's full-day kindergarten program produces smarter, healthier students
iSchoolGuide
The School of Community Health Sciences and their partners at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, released a new study suggesting that Nevada's full-day kindergarten program is producing smarter and healthier children. "As Nevada considers its K-12 education system, it's important to think how health fits into the picture," said Max Gakh, a member of the Health Impact Assessment group and scholar in residence at the UNLV School of Community Health Sciences. "Decisions made about full-day kindergarten may have health effects, too,"
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Report: Addressing poverty gap calls for more flexible approaches (THE Journal)
A look at summer MOOCs for K-12 students (By: Archita Datta Majumdar)
Study: Standing desks strengthen student concentration (District Administration Magazine)
What you thought about minority students and special education is wrong (U.S. News & World Report)
When school's out, millions of kids go hungry (CNN)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


California lawmakers vote to remove vaccine exemptions for schoolchildren
NPR
The California Assembly has joined the state Senate in voting to approve a controversial bill requiring all children attending school to be vaccinated against measles and other common, preventable illnesses — effectively eliminating so-called "personal belief exemptions" that allowed parents to opt out. The bill is aimed at increasing immunization rates following a serious measles outbreak in December that was traced back to Disneyland and that sickened dozens. The measure passed the California Assembly on a 46-30 vote, with two Republicans joining the Democratic majority.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




President's perspective: Reflections on service to the principalship
NAESP
NAESP President Mark J. White writes: "As I have traveled this spring on your behalf, it has been very clear to me that the job of the building principal continues to be a challenging, yet very rewarding experience. The principals I've met have been challenged with spring testing, end-of-year accountability, educator effectiveness requirements, year-end events, and the normal spring-time student issues that often seem to grow as the year comes to a close."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Meet #NAESP15 conference blogger Melinda Miller
NAESP
Welcome to #NAESP15! My name is Melinda Miller and I am honored to share my NAESP experiences with all of you as the official conference blogger for the NAESP 2015 Annual Conference. This year I am celebrating my 12th year as the proud principal of Willard East Elementary School. Willard East Elementary is located just outside of Springfield, Missouri, with approximately 320 K-4th-grade students. You can find Willard East Elementary on Facebook, Twitter (@WEEPrincipal) and the Web.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
 


Before the Bell is a benefit of your membership in the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). For information about other member benefits, visit www.naesp.org or contact us at naesp@naesp.org.

Before the Bell is a digest of the most important news selected for NAESP from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The presence of such advertising does not endorse, or imply endorsement of, any products or services by NAESP. Neither NAESP nor Multiview is liable for the use of or reliance on any information contained in this briefing.

Feedback about an article? Contact NAESP Liaison Ned Colbert at EColbert@naesp.org.
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601   Download media kit
This edition of Before the Bell was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here.

NAESP | 1615 Duke Street | Alexandria, VA 22314 | www.naesp.org | 800-386-2377
Recent issues
June 23, 2015
June 19, 2015
June 16, 2015
June 12, 2015



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063