This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.


Advertisement


Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit July 07, 2015

Curriculum    School Leadership   Federal Advocacy & Policy   In the States   Association News   Buy Books   Contact NAESP


Let Kids Fly with ZipKrooz™


ZipKrooz™ brings zip line-like adventure to the playground in an exciting, inclusive and safe way!



 





What is personalized learning and how do you get there?
K-12TechDecisions
No two students are alike. They have different preferences, strengths and weaknesses, but in most schools all children are expected to learn the same way. There is very little choice as to how content is absorbed and by what method knowledge is demonstrated. Technology is changing that and as schools continue to invest in the right digital tools, the options for how students learn are endless. This has given rise to what is known as personalized learning.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




Study: 61 percent of parents believe their children do not lose reading skills over summer
iSchoolGuide
A new survey found 61 percent of parents do not think their child loses reading skills over summer. While 90 percent of them agreed with the findings that children lose some of their skills during summer due to "brain drain," the majority do not believe it to be true of their own kids.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




How phonics is taught can affect how well a child learns to read
THE Journal
New readers who focus on sounding out letters rather than learning whole words tap into that part of the human brain best wired for developing reading skills. The phonics approach to teaching reading has long held sway in early learning; now educational neuroscience can prove that approach. That's the overall finding from research recently published by Stanford University, the Child Study Center at New York University's Langone Medical Center and the Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders at the University of Texas at Austin.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT


Benefits of extracurricular sports extend into the classroom
Medical News Today
Extracurricular sports have long been promoted as a way of keeping children healthy, but new research suggests they could also provide benefits in the classroom, helping children remain engaged and disciplined. The study, published in the American Journal of Health Promotion, found that children who regularly participated in structured sports were better at following instructions and remaining focused in the classroom than their peers by the time they reached fourth grade.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Beyond academics: What a holistic approach to learning could look like
MindShift
From a child's perspective, school, extracurricular activities and home are part of the continuous experience of life. From the perspective of teachers, coaches and parents, those experiences may seem more differentiated and are thus treated separately. However, if the adults in a child's life approach his or her growth as a collaboration following a clear developmental path, every child will have a better chance at a life filled with choices and the skills to achieve goals, according to a report.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Make Every Teacher a Reading Expert

The IRLA (Independent Reading Level Assessment) helps teachers develop the expertise needed to provide on-the-spot, targeted, and immediately useful feedback specific to the reading development needs of each and every student, K-12.

Learn more at americanreading.com
 


Coding in the Common Core
Edutopia
There's been significant talk about "coding" lately — from the second annual "Hour of Code" event hosted in December by Code.org, to countries like Denmark and England incorporating computer programming into their curriculum. Here in the U.S., there are several ways in which computer programming activities support the Common Core State Standards. When students use tools such as Code Studio, Scratch, and Tynker, what they're doing is called programming. Programming is about the logic that goes into building a program. The blocks already exist — they just have to be placed in the correct order to get the program to work. This is the beginner level that most college computer programming students take.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


National Science Foundation offers grants to help STEM teachers
Education Week
The National Science Foundation is offering grants of up to $300,000 each for projects that would help teacher-leaders get more exposure and improve STEM education systemwide. It's seeking ideas now. The submission process ends July 22. Details are laid out here. Proposals may include "novel STEM research opportunities," avenues for teachers to get involved in advisory and mentoring capacities, or international travel for research and education. NSF asks that the ideas be able to be piloted for up to two years. The goals are to find successful models for long-term programs that support teacher-leaders and to help those teachers serve as national resources to improve STEM education.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement
PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Special Discount for NAESP Members!

As a member of NAESP, you could qualify for a special discount on car insurance with GEICO. Simply go online or call 1-800-368-2734, to complete a simple, no-obligation rate quote. Don’t forget to mention your NAESP membership to see how much you could save with your special member discount.
 


Teachers' pets: 3 devices that work in the classroom
EdTech Magazine
While no two educational technology programs are the same, one planning question influences them all: Which device will best serve students' needs? In the free recorded webinar "Getting Started with Google Play for Education," K–12 experts discuss three devices they've used to implement Google Play for Education in the classroom. Learn how each device benefits students and faculty, and then register for the free recorded webinar to learn more about Google Play for Education.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Overcoming the obstacles to implementing video feedback for teachers
Connected Principals (commentary)
Richard Bruford, a contributor for Connected Principals blog, writes: "The use of video is an excellent way to support teacher coaching and improvement. In John Hattie's meta-analysis of factors influencing effective teaching, micro teaching (video recording lessons) was in the top 10 strategies used by teachers that have the biggest impact on student learning. Yet despite this evidence plus better and more affordable technology, there are still many schools and teachers who are reluctant to engage with this approach to improve teaching and learning."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT


Too many kids
The Atlantic
Erica Oliver has worked for the Atlantic City School District in New Jersey for a decade, teaching first grade and a few reading programs. Early in her career, Oliver typically taught no more than four students at a time. The small classes meant that students who struggled could be easily targeted, lessons could be tailored to individual needs, and progress could be expedited, she said. Over the years, however, Oliver has seen her class sizes grow: first to 16 students, and then to 24 or 25 kids per class. She found it harder to manage her classroom, properly supervise reading groups, and encourage her students to complete projects efficiently. All of this slowed down the group's collective achievement.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Frequency of digital content use varies, survey shows
eSchool News
Ninety-seven percent of educators surveyed for an annual report said they use some form of digital content, and more than 50 percent of those respondents said they use apps, websites, and/or digital games in the classroom. But there also remains a gap between teachers' and administrators' views on digitally-enhanced instruction and professional development.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Stop Bullying/Help Prevent Suicide

Learn more about these new online training programs to help improve the climate and culture in your schools. Based on the movie, Contest, Stand Up Say No to Bullying teaches students how to handle conflict and bullying. Signs Matter helps teachers and administrators identify students who may be contemplating suicide. You can help save lives.
 


A leader's guide to technology implementations
eSchool News
Establishing a shared vision around a technology initiative is one of the most important success factors for that initiative, according to a panel of administrators from around the country who gathered at ISTE 2015 in Philadelphia to discuss a leadership roadmap to successful technology integration. The panel was based around ISTE's Essential Conditions, which are 14 necessary conditions for effectively leveraging technology. The conditions fall under the categories of people, policy and resources.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


For this transgender 3rd-grader, life as a boy is liberating
NPR
Meet 9-year-old Q Daily, who recently finished third grade at the Brooklyn New School in New York City. Q, who was born a girl, just spent his first full school year as a boy. And to him, that's liberating. Really, he explains, it's everything: "It feels like — instead of a dead flower — a growing flower." It might be a feeling his peers don't totally understand, but it seems like they really don't care, either. Billy Griffith is one of Q's closest buddies. They were friends when Q was a girl, too, and they have a lot in common. "We both like Michael Jackson a lot," Billy says. "We're both obsessed with him a lot."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




What education technology could look like over the next 5 years
MindShift
In a fast-moving field like education technology, it's worth taking a moment to take stock of new developments, persistent trends and the challenges to effective tech implementation in real classrooms. The NMC Horizon 2015 K-12 report offers a snapshot of where ed tech stands now and where it is likely to go in the next five years, according to 56 education and technology experts from 22 countries.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keywords TECHNOLOGY.




Senate braced for lengthy debate on ESEA
Education Week
After weeks of letting it languish in the legislative queue, the U.S. Senate is slated to begin debating a proposed bipartisan overhaul of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act — the first such Senate debate since 2001, when Congress last updated the law in its current iteration, the No Child Left Behind Act. Notably, the announcement by Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., that he would call the bill to the floor July 7 came just one day after 10 major education groups, including the two national teachers' unions and the Council of Chief State School Officers, banded together amid mounting frustrations and demanded the Senate make the reauthorization a priority.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  FEATURED COMPANIES
Advertisement
The Fundamental 5 - A Kindle Best Seller

Discover the revolutionary system of daily teacher actions that are transforming 1000's
of classrooms across
the nation. Order now on Amazon.com
Fun Ways to Connect Students

Quick Connection Cards (Pre-K-2nd or 3rd-6th) are the perfect tool for teachers to build positive peer relationships. Great for class transitions too! Order now.




Not all Texas districts warm to Miller's food initiative
The Texas Tribune
Students eager to purchase soda and fried foods when they return to school in the fall may be disappointed, despite Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller's recent announcement that both will be welcome back on Texas public school campuses after a 10-year ban. To the dismay of nutritionists and public health experts, Miller reversed the department's ban on soda machines and deep fat fryers in mid-June as part of a new state nutrition policy calling for more local foods, community engagement and training to help schools serve meals that are "attractive and taste great."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Fewer New York City students must go to school this summer
The New York Times
Fewer students in New York City public schools have been required to attend summer school this year than in the past several years, according to data from the city's Education Department. Data from the department also shows a lower percentage of students have been held back a grade since Bill de Blasio became mayor in 2014. According to the department, about 19,000 students, or 6.2 percent of third through eighth graders, were required to attend summer school this year to proceed to the next grade. That is lower than the average over the past five years for that group, about 26,000, or 8.3 percent of students.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Wanted: More solutions for solving the homework gap (The Hechinger Report)
Report: Federal education funding plummeting (U.S. News & World Report)
Principals' convention to focus on leadership, achievement and culture (Education Week)
100 percent is overrated (The Atlantic)
What do we do when students don't like school (Connected Principals)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




Tapping into the knowledge of others: That's a wrap
NAESP
NAESP Conference blogger Melinda Miller writes: "Wrapping up #NAESP15, both my head and heart are full this week. Let me break it down for you. My brain is on overload from all the great information shared this week. Where do I start to plan and use all the information? It's easy! Start small. Pick three things you learned that you would like to implement or try during the 2015-2016 school year. Be sure to write those three things down and put them in a place you will see every day. Whether it's your desk, your bathroom mirror, or the door of your house, post your list."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Key educational shifts/trends: What's next?
NAESP
NAESP Conference blogger Mary Kay Sommers writes: "Kim Marshall, a teacher, principal, educational leader, and editor of the well-known online Marshall Memo, shared compelling research that defies commonly held beliefs about education in a special presentation at the 2015 NAESP Conference. Kim identified proven strategies for educational leaders to increase teachers' impact on learning for all students as well to influence policy makers to make 180 degree adjustments to legislation that currently has minimal to negative impacts on student learning."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
 


Before the Bell is a benefit of your membership in the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). For information about other member benefits, visit www.naesp.org or contact us at naesp@naesp.org.

Before the Bell is a digest of the most important news selected for NAESP from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The presence of such advertising does not endorse, or imply endorsement of, any products or services by NAESP. Neither NAESP nor Multiview is liable for the use of or reliance on any information contained in this briefing.

Feedback about an article? Contact NAESP Liaison Ned Colbert at EColbert@naesp.org.
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601   Download media kit
This edition of Before the Bell was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here.

NAESP | 1615 Duke Street | Alexandria, VA 22314 | www.naesp.org | 800-386-2377
Recent issues
June 30, 2015
June 26, 2015
June 23, 2015
June 19, 2015



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063