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Curriculum    School Leadership   Federal Advocacy & Policy   In the States   Association News   Buy Books   Contact NAESP


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Principal selection methods matter
District Administration Magazine
Principal selection has not significantly changed since the 1950's and is often unsystematic. While the role of the principal has evolved greatly over the last 60 years, the methods used for selection have remained stagnant. In the 1950's, principals' duties centered primarily on staffing and facility management. Today, school principals may be responsible for tens of millions of dollars between facilities, personnel and discretionary funding. Most importantly, principals are responsible for the student achievement of hundreds to thousands of students at any given school across the United States. As school districts continue Common Core implementation, District human resource managers should consider updating their principal selection methods to ensure the most-qualified principals are leading their schools.
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Poverty rates in every US school district
The Washington Post
Anyone who cares about the plight of poor children in America should take a look at a new interactive map, below, put together by the new nonprofit EdBuild. The map shows Census Bureau poverty rates in each of the nation's nearly 14,000 school districts nationwide. The darker the blue on the map, the greater the concentration of children living in poverty. It seems like the kind of map that should have been easy to find long ago — but it hasn't been, at least not in the public realm.
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Lessons on state adoptions of the Next Generation Science Standards
Education Week
In an ongoing effort to help states navigate the process of reviewing, adopting and implementing the Next Generation Science Standards, the National Association of State Boards of Education released a short report profiling the efforts of five states and the District of Columbia in this area. The report looks at the states that received $4,000 stipends from NASBE last year to help with their science standards work. Arkansas, Delaware, Kentucky, New Jersey, West Virginia and D.C., were all either considering adopting the standards or had recently adopted them and were working on policies related to implementation. Those states and D.C. have by now all adopted the standards — Arkansas did so most recently.
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How to use technology to supplement Common Core
Education World
Monica Burns, an edTech and curriculum consultant, shared with Edutopia several tips for educators on how to best use technology to help students learn Common Core standards and therefore learn the best ways to be prepared for college and career. "As we prepare students for life beyond the classroom, including digital tools in our instruction and making connections to technology in the real world is absolutely essential," Burns said.
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Personalized learning is especially good for minority students
The Hechinger Report
What would schools look like if they were designed around the needs of students? That's the question that drives the work of Rebecca Wolfe, director of the Massachusetts-based Students at the Center project, part of the nonprofit Jobs For the Future. Called "personalized learning," the idea sounds simple: Let the students dictate the direction and pace of instruction. Its adherents claim that not only will student outcomes improve, but point to research that shows it works particularly well for students of color. However, convincing the many entrenched interests that run school bureaucracies to give in to such a radical change can be a challenge.
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Can peer accountability groups help students achieve their goals?
MindShift
Supporting students emotionally, as well as academically, takes up a large portion of teachers' time and energy. But some educators are discovering that students can take on this role for one another as well. When students hold each other accountable, many can demonstrate reflection on their learning and take responsibility for shortcomings.
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30 examples of disruption in the classroom
Te@chThought (commentary)
Terry Heick, a contributor for Te@chThought, writes: "This post is actually intended to supplement the 'Cycle of Learning Innovation' we recently published, which means this is less about analysis and context and more about the examples. First, some quick clarification so that we have a common language. In short, by 'disruption,' we are referring to something that causes the kind of impact that leads to change. To push it further, one definition of disruption might be a bottom-up cause that substantially affects the ecology it is a part of (e.g., perception, market advantages, resource needs, usage patterns, etc.), forcing redistribution (e.g., market, demographic spread, revenue, credibility, knowledge) of something else we collectively value."
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The key to school change: Getting comfortable with discomfort
Edutopia (commentary)
Grant Lichtman, a contributor for Edutopia, writes: "It is an accepted principle of organizational change: Change is hard. We are told that the process of change includes stages of recognition, denial, grief and eventual progress, much like the steps we undergo to overcome loss or addiction. I disagree. One of the central findings of my work with well over 100 schools in the last several years is that, relative to the really hard obstacles and events in life that we all face, changing most school organizations is not hard — it is uncomfortable. There is a big difference."
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The print-digital transition
Scholastic Administration Magazine
There's a revolution afoot in our nation's schools: the departure of print resources and the arrival of digital content. For more than 10 years, the digital wave has gained strength and momentum — fueled by 1:1 initiatives, improvements to bandwidth and infrastructure, and the technological modernization of society. The traditional textbook isn't dead, but its shelf life — so to speak — is dwindling.
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Report: Technology purchases driving up back-to-school budgets
THE Journal
Parents are spending more on school supplies this year, mostly for technology purchases, according to a new Consumer Pulse report from Rubicon Project. The survey, "Back-to-School Consumer Pulse Poll," was conducted online in mid-June 2015 and collected responses from 1000 parents of K-12 and college students. It found that 56 percent of parents plan to spend more money on school supplies compared to last year, with K-12 parents planning to spend an average of $873 per child, and college parents planning to spend an average of $1,124 per student.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keywords TECHNOLOGY.


The past, present and future of school design
EdSurge (commentary)
Michael B. Horn, a contributor for EdSurge, writes: "To maximize the benefits of blended learning, we'll need to rethink not just the system architecture of schooling, but also the physical architecture of schools themselves. We need more designers and architects thinking about how schools should change their physical design, clarifying the principles underlying these changes and illuminating the path to move from today's egg-crate boxes to designs fit for the future."
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Stop Bullying/Help Prevent Suicide

Learn more about these new online training programs to help improve the climate and culture in your schools. Based on the movie, Contest, Stand Up Say No to Bullying teaches students how to handle conflict and bullying. Signs Matter helps teachers and administrators identify students who may be contemplating suicide. You can help save lives.
 


Single-pane-of-glass network visibility eases K-12 BYOD management
EdTech Magazine
As soon as Sarasota County, Florida, schools began experimenting with a bring-your-own-device program, students, faculty and administrators could finally connect to the district's guest network. But not everyone's problems were solved. "Students and staff bringing their personal devices onto the network aren't really guests," says Joe Binswanger, the district's director of information technology. "The guest network was just a straight tunnel out to the Internet. It was very vanilla: very locked-down, very filtered."
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How the BRRRRR strategy can help you chill out at IEP meetings
By: Howard Margolis
If your child will soon have a new Individualized Education Program, you have to ensure it meets all his educational needs. Ideally, to develop a high-quality IEP, you'll work with the school's IEP team members. But what if you disagree with them? What if you believe they're just trying to save money and don't care about your child? If you're like some parents, you may erupt with rage. But no matter how justified you feel about your anger, you need to focus on being effective, not angry.
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House passes ESEA rewrite 218-213; Senate debate continues
Education Week
The U.S. House of Representative reconsidered and ultimately passed a Republican-backed reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act — though it's far from the measure that President Barack Obama may eventually sign into law when it's all said and done. After considering 14 amendments, including a failed Democratic substitute, members passed the ESEA rewrite, formally known as the Student Success Act, with a very close vote of 218-213. Twenty-seven Republicans crossed party-line to join the entire Democratic caucus in voting against the bill.
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Congress might finally overhaul No Child Left Behind. Here's what that means for kids.
The Huffington Post
The No Child Left Behind Act, a George W. Bush-era law that expired in 2007, may finally be on its way to becoming fully defunct. Recently, the Senate debated its version of a No Child Left Behind rewrite, called the Every Child Achieves Act. Soon, the House of Representatives is set to do the same with its version, called the Student Success Act. It is currently unclear where a final bill may land, but civil rights groups, politicians and teachers unions agree — it is time for an update.
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Obama administration: Education bills lack accountability
The Associated Press
The Obama administration said it cannot support either the Senate or the House versions of bills being considered this week to update the Bush-era No Child Left Behind education law. Cecilia Munoz, director of the White House Domestic Policy Council, says neither bill has sufficient accountability to ensure that all children get the resources they need to succeed. She, however, stopped short of saying President Barack Obama would veto the bipartisan Senate bill sponsored by Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., and Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash.
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Nevada moves to carve up fast-growing district
Education Week
Nevada's Clark County school system, the nation's fifth largest, with more than 318,000 students, could be broken up into smaller districts under a new state law that is raising major questions about how to reorganize a rapidly changing urban system. The law — signed last month by Gov. Brian Sandoval, a Republican — authorizes setting up two committees to spearhead the district's reorganization by the 2018-2019 school year.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Wanted: More solutions for solving the homework gap (The Hechinger Report)
Report: Federal education funding plummeting (U.S. News & World Report)
Principals' convention to focus on leadership, achievement and culture (Education Week)
100 percent is overrated (The Atlantic)
What do we do when students don't like school (Connected Principals)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




Spotlight: Common Core implementation
NAESP
The Learning First Alliance talked with NAESP National Distinguished Principal Jessica Johnson (@PrincipalJ) about her experience with Common Core State Standards and the advice she'd offer to others about their implementation as a part of its "Get It Right: Common Sense on the Common Core" podcast series. The series explores what it will take to get Common Core right and highlights best practices in implementation across the country. Here's some of what Johnson had to say.
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Beyond the box: Creating the innovators of tomorrow
NAESP
NAESP Conference blogger Mary Kay Sommers writes: "As principals and leaders, we know how preschoolers and kindergarteners arrive in our schools as the most creative, most eager to innovate and genuinely believe they can do anything! We also watch how these attributes are harder to observe as they move through today's educational system. Kimberlie Linz, principal of Pacific Elementary School in Manhattan Beach, California, presented a fascinating design to intentionally help her students become innovators, problem solvers and collaborative learners."
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