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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit July 17, 2015

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How to excel as a new middle level principal
MiddleWeb
A new principal experiences a range of emotions. They're elated at the opportunity but often face culture shock at many of the responsibilities associated with the position. Coping with the "shock of the new" is critical for leaders and for their schools. Larry Lashway described the phenomena this way: "New administrators experience intense, unrelenting stress as they adjust from their textbook understanding of leadership and the real world of practice."
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5 reasons schools aren't using more innovative classroom models
eSchool News
Nine out of 10 administrators surveyed in a new report said using technology effectively as part of instructional practice is important to educate and prepare students, but a few key challenges are delaying plans for more innovative classroom models. Seventy-eight percent of surveyed parents said using technology as a regular part of daily classes is the best way for their child to develop the skills they'll need to succeed in college and the workforce, according to Trends in Digital Learning: Empowering Innovative Classroom Models for Learning, released by Project Tomorrow and Blackboard.
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Report: Proficiency standards and student assessments vary between states
THE Journal
Proficiency standards and student assessments vary significantly from state to state, according to the latest report from the National Center for Education Statistics. The report, "Mapping State Proficiency Standards onto NAEP Scales: Results from the 2013 NAEP Reading and Mathematics Assessments," uses the National Assessment of Educational Progress as a common metric to compare state proficiency standards for reading and math in grades 4 and 8 for the 2012-2013 school year.
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How much tougher is Common Core?
The Atlantic
In an early glimpse of how much tougher state tests could be in the Common Core era, a new federal report shows that early adopters of the controversial standards are assessing their students using far higher bars of difficulty. While this new report is unlikely to settle the battle between Common Core advocates and foes, it does indicate that one of the original purposes of the standards — challenging students in math and reading more so they'll be better prepared for the rigors of college and their careers — seems to be proving fruitful. But tougher tests aren't contingent on adopting the Common Core: Texas, one of the few states that has eschewed the standards, is also among the few states using tests that are much more challenging.
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Common Core materials showing up in repeal states, other countries, too
Education Week (commentary)
Liana Heitin, a contributor for Education Week, writes: "Common Core instructional materials have made their way into all states, including the four — Alaska, Nebraska, Texas and Virginia — that never adopted the standards, as I wrote last week. One issue I only briefly mentioned in the story is that there are also three states that have repealed the common standards — Indiana, Oklahoma and South Carolina (which you can see in the handy map below). But teachers in those states are also using Common Core materials."
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  Bias-Busting Formative Assessment Framework
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Serving gifted students in general education classrooms
Edutopia
Gifted students who are served in general education classrooms frequently finish their work sooner than other students. This can happen in one subject area, such as mathematics or in all subject areas. Due to their rapidity of thought (VanTassel-Baska & Brown, 2007), they typically finish assignments before other children. Then they may act out because they are bored. What is really going on is a mismatch between the academic needs of the student and the pace and depth of the curricula and instructional program.
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How textbooks can teach different versions of history
NPR
This summer there's been an intense debate surrounding the Confederate flag and the legacy of slavery in this country. In Texas that debate revolves around new textbooks that 5 million students will use when the school year begins next month. The question is, are students getting a full and accurate picture of the past? Eleventh-grade U.S. history teacher Samantha Manchac is concerned about the new materials and is already drawing up her lesson plans for the coming year.
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Making learning visible: Doodling helps memories stick
MindShift
Shelley Paul and Jill Gough had heard that doodling while taking notes could help improve memory and concept retention, but as instructional coaches they were reluctant to bring the idea to teachers without trying it out themselves first. To give it a fair shot, Paul tried sketching all her notes from a two-day conference. By the end, her drawings had improved and she was convinced the approach could work for kids, too. "It causes you to listen at a different level," said Jill Gough, director of teaching and learning at Trinity Schools. Doodling has long been seen as a sign that students aren't paying attention. But it may be time to give doodling an image makeover.
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How do you get tech-resistant teachers to embrace change?
eSchool News
Many millions of dollars have been wasted over the years by the well-intentioned, but ad hoc, introduction of technology into education. Eager tech savvy teachers or administrators may jump in feet first, but a significant portion of their colleagues are left struggling along or resisting the change. The results of well-planned, long-term implementations, however, can produce momentum. When even reluctant adopters are given support, training, and time, positive changes can occur.
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US government to collect data on 'grit' levels of students
The Washington Post
Grit. It's the not-so-new thing in education that has nevertheless become a current watchword, in general for how much students persevere and stay on task. What exactly is it? Is it related to a student's character? Can it be taught? If so, how? Should it be taught? Does it always produce positive results for students? Can it be measured in any meaningful way?
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How Twitter can power your professional learning
EdTech Magazine (commentary)
Matt Renwick, an elementary school principal in Wisconsin, writes: "I had to chuckle a little when I read some of the posts of educators who had just logged on to Twitter for the first time after ISTE 2015. Following the #ISTE2015 hashtag, people were posting content that displayed both their excitement and their feeling of being overwhelmed. Whom do I follow? How often should I check my feed? What if I miss something really important?"
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Stop Bullying/Help Prevent Suicide

Learn more about these new online training programs to help improve the climate and culture in your schools. Based on the movie, Contest, Stand Up Say No to Bullying teaches students how to handle conflict and bullying. Signs Matter helps teachers and administrators identify students who may be contemplating suicide. You can help save lives.
 


Do kids need a fitness tracker?
Fox News
Fitness trackers continue to be a hot ticket item for adults looking to lose weight and get in shape, and the trend is here to stay. In fact, the wearables market will grow 35 percent over the next five years, a recent report by BI Intelligence found. And just like smartphones and tablets geared for kids, companies like X-Doria, GeoPalz and LeapFrog now offer activity trackers for children as young as 4.
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Resilience: The capacity to rebuild and grow from adversity
Psychology Today (commentary)
Over 100 years ago, the great African American educator Booker T. Washington spoke about resilience when he said, "I have learned that success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles overcome while trying to succeed." Research has since established resilience as essential for human thriving, an ability necessary for the development of healthy, adaptable young people. It's what enables children to emerge from challenging experiences with a positive sense of themselves and their futures. Children who develop resilience are better able to face disappointment, learn from failure, cope with loss and adapt to change.
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Senate votes down federal protections for K-12 LGBT students
The Washington Post
In its first vote affecting gay people since the U.S. Supreme Court decision on same-sex marriage, the Senate rejected a federal prohibition against discrimination and bullying in K-12 public schools based on sexual orientation and gender identity. Fifty-two Senators voted for such a provision, while 45 opposed it. But Senate rules required 60 votes, and the measure fell short.
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Arne Duncan wants accountability in ESEA, but it's already shifted in waivers
Education Week
The Obama administration has championed accountability in a bill to rewrite the current version of Elementary and Secondary Education Act that's expected to pass the Senate. But the administration — and its waivers from the current version of the law, the No Child Left Behind Act — have already played a huge role in shifting the federal role in monitoring states' progress towards turning around low-performing schools and helping struggling students. That's angered the civil rights community, which wishes the Senate bill had stronger protections, but is also not so thrilled with the waivers.
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US Secretary of Education will send his kids to private schools
The Christian Science Monitor
U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan will send his children to a private school in Chicago this upcoming fall, as confirmed by an email sent by Duncan's press secretary. The former head of Chicago public schools served as chief from 2001 to 2008, making him the, "longest-serving big-city education superintendent in the country," according to his White House biography. Duncan grew up in Chicago, and attended the University of Chicago Laboratory Schools, where his two children will be enrolled at in the fall. His wife, Karen, will resume teaching at the private school.
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Report: Charter schools replace students, but do so less after 3rd grade
Chalkbeat New York
New York City charter schools replace students who leave between kindergarten and third grade, according to new data from the Independent Budget Office, though seats that open up in older grades sometimes go unfilled. A new report from the city's education-data watchdog offers the clearest look yet at how the charter schools "backfill" their seats, an issue that has become a focus of debates about whether those schools serve the city's neediest students. It also includes a trove of other statistics about charter schools at a moment of rapid growth for the charter sector, whose enrollment jumped 364 percent between 2007 and 2014.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    What is personalized learning and how do you get there? (K-12TechDecisions)
How phonics is taught can affect how well a child learns to read (THE Journal)
Principal selection methods matter (District Administration Magazine)
Poverty rates in every US school district (The Washington Post)
Lessons on state adoptions of the Next Generation Science Standards (Education Week)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Books that snap, crackle, buzz and sing
The Hechinger Report
It was, she remembered, the first standing ovation she ever received as a librarian. Laura Fleming was working at an elementary school in River Edge, N.J., one of those tiny suburban school districts across the river from Manhattan. It was 2009, she'd been working in education for 12 years and she'd long been searching for books that would engage her students. But each fall, it seemed, they arrived less interested in the books she loved.
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Teacher talk and its effects on literacy
NAESP
Until recently, the way teachers interact with students and relate to information — informally called "teacher talk" — has been thought unmeasurable. It was just one of those intangible elements of teaching that we knew had an effect, but weren't sure how much or what kind of talk was actually productive. Researchers from the Lynch School of Education at Boston College as well as the University of Maryland now think they’ve found a way to put numbers to words. Patrick Proctor, Catherine Michener, and Rebecca Silverman used classroom observations and data analysis to isolate what works and what has a detrimental effect, particularly in improving student literacy. They recently presented their findings at the American Educational Research Association's annual meeting.
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Highlights from this year's conference
NAESP
Missed out on NAESP's Annual Conference in Long Beach? You can still find highlights and best practices on our 2015 Conference News page. Blog posts written by attendees share insights from the most popular sessions, covering topics such as school culture, arts and creativity, and social media strategies. You'll also find news stories, tweets and photos that capture the best moments from Long Beach. Visit naesp.org/cno for more.
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