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New menus spice up school lunches
District Administration Magazine
Teriyaki coho salmon skewers in Alaska. Red chile beef enchiladas in New Mexico. And Vietnamese pho soup in California. Inspired by new nutrition rules, districts are now offering these and other meals in hopes of getting students to eat healthier by appealing to their taste buds. And rather than hiding the nutritious ingredients, schools are enthusiastically educating students about the health benefits of ingredients such as whole-grain breads and low-fat cheese. Here are some examples of new dishes — and other strategies — districts are serving up so students will think of school meals as appetizing and healthy.
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How a better summer vacation could help low-income kids in school
Vox
Few traditions are as simultaneously cherished and maligned as school summer vacation. The long break, three months on average and luxurious by international standards, has been cited by even President Barack Obama as an example of American educational sloth. But it turns out that what America needs might not be less summer vacation. It's more equal summer vacation — a summer vacation for low-income students that looks more like what their more advantaged peers get to experience.
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Easy listening exercise for ESL students
By: Douglas Magrath
Students need to bridge the gap between short English as a second language (ESL) exercises and real lectures. The trend is now to use authentic texts, radio broadcasts and real lectures to promote student learning by stressing communication skills and presenting culture in a natural way.
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5 essential insights about mobile learning
MindShift
Just a few years ago, mobile devices were almost unheard of in classrooms. Over time, teachers and administrators have been experimenting with how to make mobile devices into powerful learning tools, and have come up with some strategies. A group of administrators from some of the first districts to pioneer Bring Your Own Device policies and other forms of mobile learning are now sharing their experiences with those hustling to get on board. The Consortium of School Networking, a professional group for district leaders, is trying to make that knowledge more widely available through its Mobile Learning Initiative.
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Why poor schools can't win at standardized testing
The Atlantic
You hear a lot nowadays about the magic of big data. Getting hold of the right numbers can increase revenue, improve decision-making, or help you find a mate — or so the thinking goes. In 2009, U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan told a crowd of education researchers: "I am a deep believer in the power of data to drive our decisions. Data gives us the roadmap to reform. It tells us where we are, where we need to go, and who is most at risk."
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New research: Students benefit from learning that intelligence is not fixed
MindShift
Teaching students that intelligence can grow and blossom with effort — rather than being a fixed trait they're just born with — is gaining traction in progressive education circles. And new research from Stanford is helping to build the case that nurturing a "growth mindset" can help many kids understand their true potential. The new research involves larger, more rigorous field trials that provide some of the first evidence that the social psychology strategy can be effective when implemented in schools on a wide scale. Even a one-time, 30-minute online intervention can spur academic gains for many students, particularly those with poor grades. The premise is that these positive effects can stick over years, leading for example to higher graduation rates; but long-term data is still needed to confirm that.
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Report: School districts are paying teachers incorrectly
The Huffington Post
Nearly 90 percent of America's school districts have a major problem, according to a report. They're paying teachers incorrectly. TNTP, a nonprofit formerly known as The New Teacher Project that advocates equal access to effective teachers, argues in the report that the prevailing system of paying teachers based on experience and education should be revamped. The organization, founded by former Washington, D.C., schools chief Michelle Rhee, instead urges a system that gives teachers higher starting pay, and gives consistently higher increases to those deemed the most effective.
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What the FCC's E-rate proposal means for the future of education
National Journal
Recently, the Federal Communications Commission took a significant step toward addressing one of the greatest imperatives in education today: ensuring that every student has access to reliable broadband Internet and the learning opportunities it can provide. FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler's proposed E-rate Modernization Order would update the 18-year-old E-rate program, the federal initiative that provides discounted telecommunications and Internet access for schools and libraries in the United States.
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Leadership, learning and compassion: The indispensables of education
Education Week (commentary)
"Leadership and learning," according to President John F. Kennedy, "are indispensable to each other." President Kennedy, however, never said those words. They were part of a speech about American strength he intended to give in Dallas on November 22, 1963 — a speech he never delivered. The remainder of President Kennedy's planned remarks in Dallas focused upon explaining that American strength comes in many forms, not just from the military.
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Early education should be integral part of elementary schools, foundation says
The Washington Post
Preschool programs should be integral parts of elementary schools with comparable funding levels and school hours; child-care professionals should be trained as teachers, not babysitters; and state data systems should include information about early education, according to a blueprint for speeding up improvements in early education. The report published Wednesday by the non-partisan New America Foundation includes wide-ranging policy recommendations for the future of early learning, spanning academic standards, teacher training, assessments, funding and evaluations that emphasize how well teachers interact with children.
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Inadequate support in schools for diabetic children
Medical News Today
Diabetic pupils who receive inadequate support from schools and insensitive treatment from teachers may not be managing their condition adequately, with worrying long-term consequences for their health. This means there is an urgent need for greater awareness of the disease, so that young people with diabetes are not singled out for unwanted attention and have the facilities they need, according to a research project led by the University of Huddersfield's Dr. Jo Brooks.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Advice for districts on 'recalibrating' principals' roles in schools (Education Week)
New Obama initiative stresses equal access to good teachers (The Huffington Post)
5 tips for keeping your school iPads safe (and not cracked) (Edudemic)
How to read education data without jumping to conclusions (The Atlantic)
Where have all the summer reading assignments gone? (eSchool News)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




For most kids, nice finishes last
NPR
A new study holds up a mirror to America's parents. A surveyed 10,000 middle and high school students in 33 different schools around the nation about what they thought their folks cared about most: that they achieve at a high level, that they are happy (defined as "feeling good most of the time"), or that they care for others. Almost 80 percent of youth picked high achievement or happiness as their top choice, while about 20 percent selected caring for others. The survey also shows that about 80 percent of kids themselves rank achievement or happiness as most important, paralleling what they believe their parents value most.
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Back to school sales tax holidays begin soon for many states
Forbes
Kelly Phillips, a contributor for Forbes, writes: "Even though it's the middle of summer, the back to school catalogues have arrived at my house: they've been dutifully dog-eared and starred. And yes, while I was shopping for a router this weekend, my kids were already begging for notebooks and planners. Despite the fact that school doesn't start in our county for another six weeks or so, my kids are ready."
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A starting point for ensuring student online privacy
Edutopia
Our society is struggling with issues regarding individual privacy. Heated debates are occurring on topics that range from whether the government should be allowed to conduct mass surveillance of citizens to the information that companies should be allowed to collect based on one's computer activity — and what they should be allowed to do with it. There are also concerns about the security of personal data in general — consider the data breach at Target last year.
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Special education funding lopsided, report finds
Disability Scoop
The level of federal special education funding sent to states varies widely thanks to an outdated model that favors some locales over others, a new report finds. The method that the federal government uses to dole out special education dollars has gone largely unchanged since 1997. As such, it's leaving significant disparities among schools, according to a new analysis of 2011 data that was conducted by the New America Foundation. Currently, federal dollars to educate students with disabilities are allocated to states based on a formula that takes into account the funding level they received in 1999, the state's population and its share of poverty. There are also minimum and maximum amounts in place as well as a requirement that no state's distribution goes down year over year unless total spending on the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act drops.
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Teachers at 22 New York City schools will evaluate their principals through PROSE program
New York Daily News
The evaluations will be done on an experimental basis at schools where teachers voted to become PROSE schools. Sixty-seven schools opted to launch the PROSE program, which means they will be exempt from following union guidelines. Of those schools, 22 will allow teachers to evaluate principals.
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For most kids, nice finishes last
NPR
A new study holds up a mirror to America's parents. A surveyed 10,000 middle and high school students in 33 different schools around the nation about what they thought their folks cared about most: that they achieve at a high level, that they are happy (defined as "feeling good most of the time"), or that they care for others.

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7 steps to authentic learning
eSchool News
Why authentic learning? There are so many reasons to choose from, some of the most important being: providing deep purpose for learning, empowering students, providing differentiation and choice options in learning, connecting students to others locally and globally, and allowing opportunities to develop empathy, creativity and innovation skills.

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Can 12 minutes of exercise make a difference for students?
Psych Central
A new study shows that 12 minutes of exercise can improve attention and reading comprehension in low-income adolescents.

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What researchers learned from kindergarten: 17 states have more than 20 percent Latino enrollment
Fox News Latino
Most of us look at children running around on a kindergarten playground and imagine the future that lies ahead of them. At the Pew Research Center, they do the inverse: they imagine what the future holds for the kindergarten. According to new data analysis from Pew, today's kindergartners provide more than just a glimpse into the future, they provide the key to the changing face of the country. The study finds a significant increase over the past decade in the number of states in which at least 1 in 5 kindergartners are Latino.
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Some Race to Top states tinker with teacher evaluations
Education Week
New Jersey recently became the sixth state with a Race to the Top grant (albeit a smaller, "bridesmaid"-sized grant) to alter or put the brakes on new teacher evaluations, a major policy shift required of the competition's winners. Recently, the state department of education watered-down the use of scores from new Common Core State Standards-aligned exams in its teacher evaluations. With Gov. Chris Christie's backing, the state lessened the weight given to the new Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Career, or PARCC, for the next two years.
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2014 Conference explores technology, pre-K and more
NAESP
NAESP's 2014 Annual Conference and Expo took place July 10-12, bringing over 1,800 school leaders to Nashville to learn, network, and engage with leading voices in education. Held at the Gaylord Opryland Hotel, the conference featured keynote presentations from best-selling authors Robert Fulghum and Susan Cain, former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, and DonorsChoose.org founder Charles Best, along with dozens of concurrent sessions.
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'Here' is more than a physical space
NAESP
One of the 2014 NAESP Annual Conference's slogans was, "It only happens here." In this wrap-up post, blogger Kathy Melton reflects on what "here" means. She writes: "'Here' is where we can have valuable, meaningful, face-to-face interactions with members of our PLN. But 'here' is also a metaphorical sweet spot, a zone where positivity spreads and we lift each other up."
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Before the Bell is a digest of the most important news selected for NAESP from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The presence of such advertising does not endorse, or imply endorsement of, any products or services by NAESP. Neither NAESP nor Multiview is liable for the use of or reliance on any information contained in this briefing.

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