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3 new developments in K-12 technology integration
eSchool News
Technology skills for students and educators are essential for college and workforce success, particularly in an increasingly global economy. But how does technology integration match up with education leaders' goals? Bring your own device initiatives continue to increase across the nation, and an annual school technology survey reveals that BYOD use or immediate planned use in secondary schools jumped from 60 percent in 2013 to 66 percent in 2014.
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Are healthier school lunches winning over students?
Education Week
While many students weren't keen on more nutritious school lunches when their districts first began complying with new federal meal standards in the 2012-2013 school year, they eventually warmed up to the healthier fare, complaining less and eating as much as they did before the rules went into place, according to two national surveys of school administrators.
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How acting out in school boosts learning
Scientific America
Acting out in school is often a prelude to parents receiving a call from the principal. But, there are ways of acting out that tremendously increase learning — namely acting out as a way of grounding, or making sense of, abstract information. There is a growing body of research showing the value of this sort of acting out. One example is the Moved by Reading intervention for teaching reading comprehension. Using the intervention, children act out the meaning of sentences by moving images on a computer screen. If the child reads, "The farmer drove the tractor to the barn," then she would move pictures of the farmer to the tractor, and both of them to the barn. This can double reading comprehension.
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Unpacking the science: How playing music changes the learning brain
MindShift
Remember "Mozart Makes You Smarter"? A 1993 study of college students showed them performing better on spatial reasoning tests after listening to a Mozart sonata. That led to claims that listening to Mozart temporarily increases IQs — and to a raft of products purporting to provide all sorts of benefits to the brain. In 1998, Zell Miller, then the governor of Georgia, even proposed providing every newborn in his state with a CD of classical music. But subsequent research has cast doubt on the claims.
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More school time on math won't help struggling students in the long run
THE Journal
Will more time in math class equate to more math fluency for middle school students? Not in the long run, according to research done at Stanford University's Center for Educational Policy Analysis. Doctoral student Eric Taylor had the chance to test out just how effective additional math class time was for struggling students by diving down into data generated by Florida's Miami-Dade County Public Schools. Administrators there had some of its sixth graders double the number of math classes in their schedule. To be put into that group, they had to score below the 50th percentile the previous year in a fifth grade state math test. However, those students didn't score much differently from other students who may have had only a few more points on the same math test.
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Contrary to popular theory, learning to read does not end in 4th grade
Medical News Today
Teachers-in-training have long been taught that fourth grade is when students stop learning to read and start reading to learn. But a new Dartmouth study in the journal Developmental Science tested the theory by analyzing brain waves and found that fourth-graders do not experience a change in automatic word processing, a crucial component of the reading shift theory. Instead, some types of word processing become automatic before fourth grade, while others don't switch until after fifth.
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Principals in US are more likely to consider their students poor
The New York Times
The phrase "soft bigotry of low expectations" is inevitably associated with George W. Bush, who used it frequently. But whatever your politics, the idea has undeniable merit: If schools don’t expect much from their students, the students are not likely to accomplish much. A new international study argues that the United States has an expectation problem. More so than any of the other 29 countries in the study, principals in American schools believe that many of their students come from socioeconomically disadvantaged homes. Based on the views of principals, a larger share of children in the United States are "socioeconomically disadvantaged" compared with those in Brazil, Malaysia, Mexico, Romania and various other countries.
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Common Core app adoption: Tips for administrators
District Administration Magazine
The constantly expanding world of mobile education tech means apps have become the tech of choice for implementing the Common Core State Standards. Administrators must now wade through hundreds of Common Core-aligned apps to determine which will get the best results in their classrooms. "We're all looking at apps differently now — instead of saying 'This app is good for reading,' we're saying 'This app aligns to these [particular] Common Core standards and outcomes,'" says Robbie Melton, associate vice chancellor of mobilization emerging technology at the Tennessee Board of Regents.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Advice for districts on 'recalibrating' principals' roles in schools (Education Week)
Schools rewiring to close digital gap (USA Today)
The elephant in the language classroom (Edutopia)
How to read education data without jumping to conclusions (The Atlantic)
Where have all the summer reading assignments gone? (eSchool News)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


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School smarts: How to leverage business intelligence in K-12
EdTech Magazine
Think business intelligence is only for businesses? Think again. Forrester Research defines the BI market as "a set of methodologies, processes, architectures and technologies that leverage the output of information management processes for analysis, reporting, performance management and information delivery." Sure, such insights can drive profits. But they also can help leaders in any organization — including schools and districts — build stronger relationships with their stakeholders, improve student performance and streamline operations.
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Study: For poor teens, better schools equal less risky behavior
The Christian Science Monitor
Low-income teenagers are significantly less likely to engage in certain risky health behaviors, such as gang membership and binge drinking, when they attend high-performing schools, according to a new study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics. The newest evidence in a growing national discussion about the connections between health and education, the University of California, Los Angeles study compared low-income students in lottery-based, high-performing public charter schools with other teens who were not accepted into those schools.
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Charter schools, money and test scores
NPR
The University of Arkansas recently released what it calls a "first ever" study exploring the relationship between charter school funding and student achievement. Here at NPR Ed we get a lot of press releases for studies related to education — teacher turnover, financial aid access, social and emotional learning in preschool and more. But not all studies are created equal. It's important to understand not only what the study says but who the researchers are and how they arrived at their conclusions.
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4 secure online learning platforms to use
eSchool News
As more educators engage with students outside of the classrooms, usually through office hours, using a secure learning platform might just be the answer to questions about how to initiate and maintain this communication. A learning platform is a web-based system modeling an in-person education by providing virtual access to class material, homework, assessments, and many other academic resources. These platforms also have the added benefit of being a social space for educators and students.
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The happy eating place: How elementary students can run their own business
Edutopia
The menu changes every time they open, and specialties range from turkey pozole to hearty fish chowder, quinoa salad to broccoli pasta, and blueberry scones to cheesy pigs-in-blankets. They use only organic, low-sugar ingredients and sustainably-raised meats or vegetarian alternatives. But this is not a fancy, five-star restaurant. It's an elementary school, and all the chefs are fourth and fifth graders.
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Troubled path forward for education spending bill
Education Week
Remember when congressional appropriators were adamant about this year being the year they would finally pass a real spending bill for the upcoming federal fiscal year? Well, it's safe to say the odds of that actually happening are nil. First, let's take stock of how far each chamber has advanced its fiscal 2015 appropriations bills: The House made the most progress, passing six (or half) of its spending bills. The appropriations committee itself cleared every spending bill except for the education funding proposal, which hasn't yet made it out of subcommittee.
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States with the costliest teacher attrition
eSchool News
Teacher attrition costs the United States up to $2.2 billion a year, and states including California and Texas are among the top when it comes to financial impact. A new report from the Alliance for Excellent Education examines the reasons teachers leave their profession, analyzes the costs of recruitment and teacher replacement, and offers recommendations to help prevent educator turnover. About 500,000 teachers move or leave the field entirely each year. High-poverty and urban schools experience a higher rate of turnover, with about 20 percent of teachers in these schools leaving each calendar year. This rate is roughly 50 percent higher than educator turnover in more affluent schools, according to the report.
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TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
More school time on math won't help struggling students in the long run
THE Journal
Will more time in math class equate to more math fluency for middle school students? Not in the long run, according to research done at Stanford University's Center for Educational Policy Analysis.

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7 steps to authentic learning
eSchool News
Why authentic learning? There are so many reasons to choose from, some of the most important being: providing deep purpose for learning, empowering students, providing differentiation and choice options in learning, connecting students to others locally and globally, and allowing opportunities to develop empathy, creativity and innovation skills.

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Can 12 minutes of exercise make a difference for students?
Psych Central
A new study shows that 12 minutes of exercise can improve attention and reading comprehension in low-income adolescents.

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Race to the Top at 5: States' spending plans
Education Week
Race to the Top — the Obama administration's signature education-redesign initiative — officially turns 5 years old at the end of July. The anniversary marks the time period in which competition winners were supposed to finish spending their last competitive-grant dollars and implementing their proposed education policy changes. Most states, however, secured a one-year, no-cost extension from the U.S. Department of Education to continue spending their winnings through a fifth year in order to finalize specific policy overhauls.
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Write for Principal magazine
NAESP
No one knows a principal's job better than you do. You know the challenges, the rewards, the humor, and the successes. How about sharing some of those experiences with your colleagues? Writing for our magazine is a great way to help other principals while giving you fresh insights into your own professional development. View the 2014-2015 Editorial Calendar and submission guidelines for more information.
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What's on your summer reading list? Try NAESP's best books for principals
NAESP
Plan ahead for next year with strategies, ideas, and inspiration from the latest education best-sellers. Peruse the National Principals Resource Center bookstore, filled with titles on instructional leadership, professional development, Common Core, school culture and more.
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Before the Bell is a benefit of your membership in the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). For information about other member benefits, visit www.naesp.org or contact us at naesp@naesp.org.

Before the Bell is a digest of the most important news selected for NAESP from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The presence of such advertising does not endorse, or imply endorsement of, any products or services by NAESP. Neither NAESP nor Multiview is liable for the use of or reliance on any information contained in this briefing.

Feedback about an article? Contact NAESP Liaison Meredith Barnett at MBarnett@naesp.org.
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601   Download media kit
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