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For schools with child immigrants, what resources are available?
Education Week
While the Obama administration takes action to stem the flow of unaccompanied minors across the Southwest border and contain the mounting political blowback, many of these children have already turned up in public schools and will continue to do so in the months ahead. Under federal law, they are entitled to a free public education regardless of their immigration status. Just two months ago, the U.S. Department of Education reminded school districts of their legal obligations when it comes to undocumented students.
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Survey results show teachers need more professional development
By: Archita Datta Majumdar (commentary)
Teachers who are open to knowledge are the ones best suited to deliver knowledge. In this regard, professionals who are constantly looking at improving teaching practices and developing their teaching skills will be the foundation for a powerful and positive school community. After all, great teachers help create great students. So how are American teachers faring in this regard? The latest findings by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development in their Teaching and Learning International Survey are eye-opening.
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Learning to read may take longer than we thought
NPR
Most of what we know — or think we know — about how kids learn comes from classroom practice and behavioral psychology. Now, neuroscientists are adding to and qualifying that store of knowledge by studying the brain itself. The latest example: new research in the journal suggests a famous phenomenon known as the "fourth-grade shift" isn't so clear-cut.
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How questions promote cognitive, social and emotional learning across subject areas
Edutopia (commentary)
Maurice Elias, a contributor for Edutopia, writes: "In the last blog, we took a look at the perspective of perspective of Irving Sigel on the importance of asking different kinds of questions as a way of deepening students' social, emotional, and cognitive learning. Coming from a Piaget approach, Irv felt that students needed to go from understanding the material as presented to generating their own thoughts about it. He referred to this as 'distancing' — not the clearest term, but a way of saying that questions could be sequenced toward leading to students' higher order and constructivist thinking by having them take a range of perspectives about a given reading or topic."
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Childhood reading skills linked to 'higher intelligence' in young adults
Medical News Today
A new study published in the journal Child Development finds that having strong reading skills as a child is a predictor for higher intelligence levels as a young adult. In previous studies, reading ability has been associated with improved health, education, socioeconomic status and creativity. The ability to read well can directly improve some of these factors. An example is that by being able to extract information from texts, individuals are better able to gain educational qualifications.
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Could the same genes shape math skills as reading ability?
MindShift
Many of us tend to align ourselves with either numbers or words. We're either math brains or we're reading brains. In college, my fellow English majors joked about how none of us could long-divide to save our lives, while our friends in engineering groaned about the fact that Lit 101 was a graduation requirement. But it turns out that about half the genes that influence a child's math ability also seem to influence reading ability, according to a study published in the journal Nature Communications.
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2 benefits of eBooks for early readers
eSchool News
The future of eBooks opens up opportunities for teachers and students alike. eBooks provide fluent readings and other engaging tools that help early readers achieve academic success. And, with the help of modern technology, they expand possibilities far outside what traditional books provide. If utilized correctly, eBooks can position students for early reading success.
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What to do when district mistakes go viral
District Administration Magazine
At one point or another, school districts find themselves in the glare of a harsh media spotlight. Sometimes a well-intentioned decision backfires. In other cases, an employee's inappropriate or illegal behavior sparks outrage. Within days, or even hours, the news goes viral and the whole world seems to know. What's a school leader to do in such a situation? For advice, DA turned to Terry Abbott, a former press secretary for Houston ISD and former chief of staff at the U.S. Department of Education. Abbott now runs Drive West Communications, a public relations agency that often does crisis communications consulting with school districts.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    5 tips for expediting the teacher hiring process (District Administration Magazine)
Classroom security: What you should (not) do (eSchool News)
The problem isn't teacher recruiting; it's retention (THE Journal)
Unpacking the science: How playing music changes the learning brain (MindShift)
How acting out in school boosts learning (Scientific America)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Looking to share your expertise?
MultiBriefs
In an effort to enhance the overall content of Before the Bell, we'd like to include peer-written articles in future editions. As a member of NAESP, your knowledge of the industry lends itself to unprecedented expertise. And we're hoping you'll share this expertise with your peers through well-written commentary. Because of the digital format, there's no word or graphical limit. Our group of talented editors can help with final edits. If you're interested in participating, please contact Ronnie Richard to discuss logistics.
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Strengthening the shell of your school
District Administration Magazine
Administrators budgeting for construction have the tools and access to ensure their buildings' shells — the roofs, windows and insulation — are energy-efficient and easy to maintain. "School administrators have gone from not really thinking much about roofs and other exteriors to thinking how they can maximize the performance of buildings and lower costs," Jared Blum, president of the Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Association, told DA. There are many issues to consider when selecting roofs, windows and insulation that lower energy costs.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword ADMINISTRATORS.


Shootings redefine beat of school police officers
The New York Times
Once, perhaps unfairly, they fit a Mayberry image. School-based police officers were seen as friendly if a bit over-the-hill, a touch out of shape and counting the days to retirement as they watched children head from the lunchroom to recess. If anything serious happened, they were to lock the building and wait for help. But the string of mass killings at schools over the past 15 years has changed all that, adding urgent new duties and risks to the job and drawing in younger and often burlier officers. Out of hard experience has come a major rethinking of tactics in a crisis.
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5 essential ingredients for learning (SPLAT)
Connected Principals (commentary)
William Parker, a contributor for Connected Principals blog, writes: "I was listening to a fascinating show by Pat Flynn, blogger and podcaster who was interviewing Bryan Kelly from What The Speak on the neuroscience behind great presentations. As I thought about the research Kelly had done on what makes great presentations, I was reminded how good teaching, leadership, or any communication include the same ingredients. Kelly created the acronym, SPLAT, to define the five ingredients in helping others learn."
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10 steps that protect the privacy of student data
THE Journal
Over the past year, data privacy has become a top concern of parents and policymakers. Lead news stories on national security surveillance and the theft of department store credit card information have heightened awareness of the issue and escalated the debate on the political right and left. In education, concerns about privacy were a contributing factor to the failure of the inBloom effort.
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Let 'em out! The many benefits of outdoor play in kindergarten
MindShift
For the typical American kindergartner, unstructured free play during the school day consists of 20 to 30 minutes of recess, and perhaps some time at indoor "stations" — perhaps creating with building blocks, costumes or musical instruments. But what if there was more? What if the answer to "what did you do in school today?" was, "I climbed a tree, played in the mud, built a fire?"
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Report: Low salaries keep many teachers out of the middle class
The Huffington Post
Teachers' starting salaries may be nothing to brag about, but a big problem lies in the fact that these salaries barely grow over time, says a new report. Released by the Center for American Progress, the report says many areas of the country barely pay teachers more as they gain experience. This problem might be contributing to high teacher turnover rates and keeping educators out of the middle class. While the report recognizes that low teacher pay is not news — especially when it comes to low entry-level salaries — researchers were interested in seeing if the salaries of mid- and late-career teachers "were high enough to attract and keep the nation's most talented individuals." However, in a profession where teacher turnover costs up to $2 billion annually, the results they found are quite depressing.
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US educators lead the world in overestimating student poverty, which may affect educational mobility
The Hechinger Report
Do educators' perceptions of how disadvantaged their students are matter? Put another way, when teachers think their students are underprivileged, do they have lower expectations for them, and do their students achieve less at school? In a July 22, 2014, article "Poverty and the perception of poverty — how both matter for schooling outcomes," Andreas Schleicher, director of education and skills at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, argues that perceptions often matter more than reality, with distressing consequences. He found that principals in some countries vastly overestimate the poverty level of their students, and their perception of disadvantage negatively correlates with student math achievement.
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Some states without NCLB waivers say they dodged a bullet
Education Week
When President Barack Obama first offered states flexibility from mandates of the No Child Left Behind Act back in 2011, nearly every state jumped at the opportunity. (Forty-two states and the District of Columbia now have waivers. Washington state lost its flexibility earlier this year. That leaves seven waiverless states total.) But almost three years later, at least one state, Utah, is thinking of voluntarily ditching its waiver. And officials in at least three other waiverless states say they don't feel they're missing out on much, even though they're stuck operating under the much-maligned, outdated NCLB law.
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What to do when district mistakes go viral
District Administration Magazine
At one point or another, school districts find themselves in the glare of a harsh media spotlight. Sometimes a well-intentioned decision backfires. In other cases, an employee's inappropriate or illegal behavior sparks outrage.

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read more
Maximizing PLC time to flip your class
District Administration Magazine
Recently, we have been talking with a number of people about how to best implement flipped learning, and one hurdle mentioned over and over by teachers is that they do not have enough time.

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5 apps for today's administrators
eSchool News
Leading a school or a school district is, understandably, an important and critical job. Today's school administrators must keep up to date with learning trends, instructional strategies, technology initiatives, and everything in between.

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Texas delays rollout of new teacher evaluations
The Texas Tribune
Texas will take an additional year to pilot a controversial new state teacher evaluation system, Education Commissioner Michael Williams told federal education officials. "Texas educators understand the need to update the current evaluation system to one that better reflects what's occurring in today's classroom," he said in a written statement. "If Texas is to develop an evaluation system that truly supports our teachers, we need time to complete the pilot year and then utilize the constructive feedback we will receive from our school districts, charters and educators."
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Balancing special-education needs with rising costs
The New York Times
Dylan B. Randall could not speak or stand. He never tasted food because he was fed through a gastric tube in his belly. He breathed through a ventilator; his own saliva would choke him unless a nurse cleared his throat every few minutes. It was a daily struggle to keep Dylan alive, much less educate him. And when his public school could not deliver all the daily therapy the then 5-year-old was supposed to receive, his parents asked that New York City pay for what they believed was the kind of education Dylan needed: a private school for disabled children.
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Upcoming webinars explore middle-level tools, playground safety
NAESP
Join NAESP for two learning opportunities in August. First, on Wednesday, Aug. 20, principal Matthew Saferite will present a webinar on using middle-level tools to improve teacher development. Second, on Tuesday, Aug. 26, two playground experts will explore common safety hazards and techniques principals can use to keep students safe. Both presentations are free. Sign up, and view archived webinars, at NAESP's webinar page.
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Register for upcoming mentor training in Alexandria, Virginia
NAESP
Being a principal is a tough job, especially with today's increasing demands on school leaders. Mentoring can provide crucial support to new principals. The NAESP National Mentor Program is designed to engage retired and experienced principals to give back to their profession by supporting new, newly assigned or even experienced principals through mentoring. Ready to dive in? The next mentor training session is Oct. 2-4 in Alexandria, Virginia.
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Before the Bell is a benefit of your membership in the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). For information about other member benefits, visit www.naesp.org or contact us at naesp@naesp.org.

Before the Bell is a digest of the most important news selected for NAESP from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The presence of such advertising does not endorse, or imply endorsement of, any products or services by NAESP. Neither NAESP nor Multiview is liable for the use of or reliance on any information contained in this briefing.

Feedback about an article? Contact NAESP Liaison Meredith Barnett at MBarnett@naesp.org.
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