This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit August 07, 2015

Curriculum    School Leadership   Federal Advocacy & Policy   In the States   Association News   Buy Books   Contact NAESP


Let Kids Fly with ZipKrooz™


ZipKrooz™ brings zip line-like adventure to the playground in an exciting, inclusive and safe way!


Mathematical Olympiads for Elementary and Middle Schools

Math Problem solving contests for teams of up to 35 students in grades 4 through 8.

 





Study: Billions of dollars in annual teacher training is largely a waste
The Washington Post
A new study of 10,000 teachers found that professional development — the teacher workshops and training that cost taxpayers billions of dollars each year — is largely a waste. The study released Tuesday by TNTP, a nonprofit organization, found no evidence that any particular approach or amount of professional development consistently helps teachers improve in the classroom. "We are bombarding teachers with a lot of help, but the truth is, it's not helping all that much," said Dan Weisberg, TNTP's chief executive. "We are not approaching this in a very smart way. We're basically throwing a lot of things against the wall and not even looking to see whether it works."
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




Catch a back-to-school spending break with sales-tax holidays
The New York Times
August is time for back-to-school shopping — and, in many states, that means so-called sales-tax holidays as well. In at least 17 states this year, shoppers may buy school supplies, clothing and other items on designated dates without paying the usual state sales tax. In some cases, purchases are also exempt from local sales taxes. State sales taxes range from less than 2 percent to more than 7 percent, but local option sales taxes can push the overall rate to 9 percent or higher in some areas. Some states have already held their temporary tax-free periods, but most will occur over the next month or so.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Learning to embrace a child's unique potential
By: Jane Schoenfeld
Transition is all the rage, and it should be. But what do you do with a kid who doesn't fit neatly into any of the categories? What do you do with any kid in fact? They're all individuals with different strengths and challenges. My daughter has multiple medical conditions, no physical disabilities, many learning difficulties and a PDD-NOS diagnosis, which puts her on the autism spectrum. She graduated from high school with a full diploma and spent two years in college before she decided it was just too hard and not clearly enough structured. So, what to do?
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT


Full STEAM ahead
Scholastic Administration Magazine
Talk about a lightbulb moment. Last year, a visiting artist came to Quatama Elementary School in Hillsboro, Oregon, to show second graders how to make light sculptures. But when the time came to light up her sculpture, nothing happened. Calmly, the artist fixed the problem in the circuit and illuminated the sculpture. Students got a three-in-one lesson in electricity, art and how to deal with inevitable setbacks that arise in STEM projects. So when students tackled their own light sculptures, recalls Principal Janis Hill, "nobody fell apart."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Elementary classroom hacks: Big ideas at little cost
Edutopia (commentary)
Samantha McBurney, a sixth grade math and social studies teacher, writes: "It was my first year of teaching in my own classroom, and I was learning that teaching first grade requires a lot of creativity. It was also pretty clear from the beginning that customizing any classroom for teaching efficiency and student engagement could easily cost a lot of money. This is why I started to explore and practice the amazing and amusing art of classroom hacking."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Improve Instruction with Actionable Data
The IRLA is a reading leveling assessment, and conferencing tool that 
maps out the developmental sequence of reading acquisition, K-12. 
With the IRLA, teachers know where each student is, where they 
should be, and which skills/behaviors must be mastered to 
 


Seeing struggling math learners as 'sense makers,' not 'mistake makers'
MindShift
In discussions of progressive and constructivist teaching practices, math is often the odd subject out. Teachers and schools that are capable of creating real-world, contextualized, project-based learning activities in every other area of school often struggle to do the same for mathematics, even as prospective employers and universities put more emphasis on its importance. This struggle may come from a fundamental misunderstanding about the discipline and how it should be taught.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


What classrooms can learn from informal learning
Te@chThought (commentary)
Derek Spanfelner, a contributor for Te@chThought, writes: "I spent more than 5 years in public school classrooms, both urban and suburban, and while I saw a lot of educators working their behinds off and engaging kids in valuable, essential learning, I also saw a lot of kids that were disenchanted by what school had to offer. After years in the public school system, many of the students that need school the worst had been taught one irrevocable truth: learning was not for them. And not just because school was too hard or too easy, but because it was often at odds with their interests and desires."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT


New app teaches coding with robots
THE Journal
How can teachers push students to learn programming in the classroom through such endeavors as December's upcoming Hour of Code if they don't know how to code themselves? This question led to the creation of a new app that teaches students the basics of coding without much input from the teacher. Blockly, originally developed by Google, has been updated by Wonder Workshop to allow students to control robots through a simple drag-and-drop interface.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Discovery launches new STEM services for PD and curriculum
eSchool News
Discovery Education is launching three new services designed to help school systems nationwide grow capacity for STEM teaching and learning. The new resources aim to support school systems in building and sustaining a culture of STEM education through a unique combination of immersive professional development initiatives, job-embedded instructional coaching, rich digital content and extensive community engagement.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Stop Bullying/Help Prevent Suicide

Learn more about these new online training programs to help improve the climate and culture in your schools. Based on the movie, Contest, Stand Up Say No to Bullying teaches students how to handle conflict and bullying. Signs Matter helps teachers and administrators identify students who may be contemplating suicide. You can help save lives.
 




What's keeping administrative license holders from becoming school leaders?
By: Dr. Sheri Williams (commentary)
Reports of the shortage of applicants for school leadership positions are well-known. The authors of "Churn: The High Cost of Principal Turnover" say a quarter of the country's principals will leave their schools each year, and nearly 50 percent will leave in the third year. Missing from the reports is an analysis of why individuals who already hold an administrative license are not applying for vacant principal positions.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


When parents are the ones getting schooled by the Common Core
The Atlantic
"It feels like a dark time," wrote the comedian Louis C.K. in a tweet last April. "I'm pissed," he wrote in another, a few minutes later. C.K. was, indeed, very, very angry. And this time, it wasn't his own "yucky" existence that was making him fume. Rather, it was a different kind of "massive stressball" irking him: the Common Core State Standards. In his now-famous rant, the middle-aged father of two lamented the controversial academic benchmarks and the accompanying onslaught of rigorous testing in New York City's public schools, where his daughters were enrolled. Specifically, C.K. was exasperated by the Common Core's overhaul of math — a subject his kids, he noted, once loved.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keywords FUNDING.


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Choose Graceland!

Graceland University is ranked #5 in the country for Online Masters of Education programs by US News and World Report. We have a 98% graduation rate and 97% would recommend our program to a friend. We have 4 programs to meet the needs of practically any teacher.

Apply Now
 


Providing free wireless hotspots helps this district close the equity gap
eSchool News
The achievement gap. The literacy gap. The nutrition Gap. The preschool gap. It seems like our education system talks and talks about the inequities that exist between students and schools that are well-funded, well-supported, and well-granted, and those that struggle to keep the lights on, pay their staff and run the HVAC. There's another gap, a growing one, perhaps with less media buzz, that has made its way to the doors of our schools. It's one we can no longer ignore. This is the chasm between the homes with and those without access to quality broadband.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Overcoming the K-12 digital divide with education broadband
EdTech Magazine
Chad A. Stevens, a contributor for EdTech Magazine, wrties: "Serving as a classroom teacher, school administrator and chief technology officer over the course of 14 years, I've seen the emergence of classroom instruction combined with self-directed online study. Blended learning, as it is called, is gaining in popularity. In fact, recent statistics show that more than half of sixth- through 12th-grade students complete online homework assignments on a weekly basis. Unfortunately, not all students have equal access to broadband at home. According to a November 2014 report issued by the U.S. Census Bureau, households with annual income of under $25,000 are less than half as likely to have broadband access as those with $150,000 or more."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE






Federal government shutdown on the horizon?
Education Week
When Congress returns from its five-week summer break Sept. 8, lawmakers will scramble to avert a government shutdown before Oct. 1, when the curtain closes on the current fiscal year. To do so, they'll have to broker a deal to either continue current spending levels for a certain period of time — something known as a continuing resolution, or CR — or hash out a broader, all-inclusive spending plan called an omnibus. They could also settle on a combination of the two, in which they agree on an all-inclusive spending plan for a limited period of time, a hybrid fiscal fix known inside the Beltway as a "cromnibus."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


A look at Clinton's universal pre-K plan
By: Archita Datta Majumdar
At a time when all eyes are focused at higher education and improving graduation rates across the nation, Hillary Clinton has announced her support for universal pre-K. She first mentioned this in June during her campaign in Rochester, New Hampshire, but has since then gone on to be vocal about how and why she wants it implemented. The plan focuses on making high-quality preschools more accessible — especially to kids from low-income families — by 2025.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  FEATURED COMPANIES
Advertisement
The Fundamentals for Teaching Smarter

"The Fundamental 5 improves instruction. The power of these practices will transform classrooms and schools," E. Don Brown, NASSP past president. Order now at Amazon.com
Fun Ways to Connect Students

Quick Connection Cards (Pre-K-2nd or 3rd-6th) are the perfect tool for teachers to build positive peer relationships. Great for class transitions too! Order now.




New York City task force targets cheating by teachers and principals
The New York Times
The New York City Department of Education said that it would establish a task force to root out cheating by teachers and administrators in city schools, responding to recent episodes and allegations of grade inflation, forged test answers and the passing of students who rarely attended class. The task force, made up of administrators and auditors, will oversee staff monitoring school data for irregularities and if they discover anything suspicious it will be reported to the city's special commissioner of investigation. The group will also supply mandatory training in grading and graduation regulations to principals.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Oregon ELLs who are suspended suffer on state tests, study shows
Education Week
Middle and high school English language learners in six Oregon school districts are suspended and expelled at slightly higher rates than their native English speaking peers, a new study from the Regional Education Laboratory Northwest found. The study also found that ELLs subjected to suspension or expulsion had "substantially" lower achievement on state tests than English learners who weren't. The analysis shows that ELLs in middle and high school were suspended more often for aggression and insubordination, but does not explain why.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    The future of school libraries (Scholastic Administration Magazine)
AYP gets the boot in Every Child Achieves Act (The Journal)
The importance of the teacher supply to education reform (Brookings)
Social-emotional skills on the rise (Education Week)
This game could improve behavior — and achievement (eSchool News)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




Quick tips to manage Twitter
NAESP
Watching the Twitter feed roll by with everything else you are following can be mind-boggling. But according to social media mavens Dan Butler and Theresa Stager, with the right tools, you can efficiently use Twitter to connect with other professionals and provide yourself with free professional development. Butler and Stager recently presented on this issue at NAESP's Best Practices for Better Schools Annual Conference in Long Beach, California. They explained that to strengthen your personal learning network through Twitter, you must filter the information you are viewing.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Level-up your instructional leadership
NAESP
There are speakers. There are presenters. And then there is Todd Whitaker. Todd brings the thunder (thunderous applause) wherever he presents. His session with Annette Breaux at NAESP's recent conference in Long Beach was no exception. The "Ten-Minute Inservice" session focused on building teacher effectiveness. For those who were not lucky enough to squeeze into Todd and Annette's PACKED session, I offer you several of my take-aways based on what they shared.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
 


Before the Bell is a benefit of your membership in the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). For information about other member benefits, visit www.naesp.org or contact us at naesp@naesp.org.

Before the Bell is a digest of the most important news selected for NAESP from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The presence of such advertising does not endorse, or imply endorsement of, any products or services by NAESP. Neither NAESP nor Multiview is liable for the use of or reliance on any information contained in this briefing.

Feedback about an article? Contact NAESP Liaison Ned Colbert at EColbert@naesp.org.
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601   Download media kit
This edition of Before the Bell was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here.

NAESP | 1615 Duke Street | Alexandria, VA 22314 | www.naesp.org | 800-386-2377
Recent issues
July 31, 2015
July 28, 2015
July 24, 2015
July 23, 2015 Blast



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063