This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.


Advertisement


  Mobile version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit Aug. 9, 2013

Curriculum    School Leadership   Federal Advocacy & Policy   In the States   Association News   Buy Books   Contact NAESP


Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement


Moving
To Success

Moving To Success embraces the belief that students who become competent movers and are knowledgeable regarding the health-related benefits of being physically active are more likely to lead a physically active lifestyle. 864-680-8471
MORE



 



Study: States struggle to fund stricter school curriculum
Reuters
States that have adopted a stricter, standardized school curriculum are having difficulty finding the resources to support the more rigorous requirements, a study released on Wednesday shows. Of the 40 states that adopted the Common Core State Standards, 34 reported trouble finding adequate funding to support the stringent activities the curriculum entails, said the survey by the Center for Education Policy at George Washington University.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  


Advertisement


Budget cuts mean more fees for students
District Administration Magazine
School districts working to close budget gaps are increasingly requiring parents to pay fees for their children's textbooks, lab materials, computers, and after-school activities. It's a regrettable but widespread trend, says Bruce Hunter, associate executive director of advocacy, policy and communications at the School Superintendents Association. "The recession lasted longer and cut deeper than anyone thought it would," Hunter says. "Districts try to charge as little as possible, because it's not popular. It’s a last resort."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Report: States make headway in aligning curriculum to Common Core
Education Week
A majority of states say they have already begun to teach a curriculum aligned with the Common Core State Standards in at least some districts or grade levels, new survey results show. In fact, nine of the states say they began to implement a new math curriculum reflecting the standards across their entire K-12 system during the 2012-2013 academic year or earlier, and 12 report the same for English/language arts. These are just a few of the findings from a new report that probes in depth the progress states are making on a variety of fronts — and the challenges they are encountering — to help bring the Common Core to life in classrooms.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement
PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  TRYING TO MAKE SENSE OF THE COMMON CORE?

Watch this two-minute video to learn about the simplest way to implement and teach the Common Core Standards.

CLICK HERE TO WATCH
 


Does spelling still matter?
USA Today
Glance at any "c u soon"-splattered smartphone screen and it's obvious: The nation's spelling is in jeopardy. The orthographic schism between the YOLO generation and its elders came into stark relief over the weekend when a Connecticut eighth-grader told his local newspaper that he was "cheated" out of a Jeopardy! victory for "just a spelling error," scribbling "emanciptation" instead of "emancipation" in answer to a question about the 13th Amendment. Cue the Facebook furor, with some posters pointing the finger at Alex Trebek and company for their "bad call" and others calling Thomas Hurley III of Newtown a "cry baby."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    What's important in a digital device initiative? (eSchool News)
Dropout indicators found for 1st grade students (Education Week)
Avoiding Common Core's biggest legal liabilities (THE Journal)
Despite benefits, recess for many students is restricted (MindShift)
Arming Arkansas teachers with guns in school (USA Today)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


SPONSORED CONTENT




Hire ground in school hiring
Connected Principals Blog (commentary)
Larry Fliegelman, a contributor for Connected Principals Blog, writes: "With the school year only a few weeks away, this administrator is finally about to wrap up the process of hiring all the staff I need for the year. It all started this spring… Due to changes in grant funding, a para-educator getting a teaching job, and one of my best teachers leaving to become a principal, I found myself finishing the school year in June with three unanticipated openings. Now, many hours later, many resumes later, many interviews later I am just about done. Two candidates have signed on and the last one has a little more work to do to make her final decision."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  FEATURED COMPANIES
Advertisement
The Fundamental 5 - A Kindle Best Seller

Discover the revolutionary system of daily teacher actions that are transforming 1000's
of classrooms across
the nation. Order now on Amazon.com
Advertisement
Safer,Faster, Easier Dismissal Procedures


ON SALE NOW

For Educators and Concerned Parents


CarRider Signs, CarRider Tags, SCoolBus Tags, AfterSCool Tags & Walker Tags and more.
Click here to learn more now.


Size matters: A look at school-district consolidation
Center for American Progress
When it comes to education, not all spending is equal. Some education dollars are spent more productively than others. In other words, some school districts use their resources well and show higher levels of student achievement for the same amount of spending compared to other districts. In a time of lagging revenues and flat achievement in many districts, policymakers have increasingly started to pay greater attention to the question of whether we are getting the most out of every education dollar.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword SCHOOL DISTRICT.




The simple power of a screenshot
Edutopia
Sometimes it's the little things that can prove to be powerful. The quick and easy action of taking a screenshot can transform how you use technology in your classroom. A screenshot is simply a picture of what is on the screen of your device. On the iPad, users press the home button and power button at the same time, and a snapshot of the screen is sent directly to the Camera Roll. Taking a screenshot is the perfect way to capture student work on mobile devices.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Technology and education: The tipping point?
The Huffington Post
Recently, The Federal Communications Commission voted to overhaul and possibly expand one of its funding programs with $2.3 billion to provide schools and libraries with up-to-date telecommunications service and equipment, including high-speed Internet connections. Clearly an indication, as President Barack Obama has been promising, that education will get the connectivity it needs to transform learning. This latest bit of news, still to be finalized by the commission, is a reflection of the growing importance of technology to transforming education. Recently, the Economist Magazine, which has been following the challenges in education for over a decade observed "A long-overdue technological revolution is at last under way."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




More schools use cellphones as learning tools
USA Today
Although schools have traditionally banned or limited cellphones in the classroom, 73 percent of Advanced Placement and National Writing Project teachers said their students use phones in the classroom or to complete assignments, according to a Pew Research Center study.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  PRODUCT SHOWCASES
Advertisement
Customized Solutions with Students in Mind.

With more than 60 restaurants, over 65 years of guest service experience in the retail restaurant industry and over 80 food service locations, Piccadilly Food Service has the ability to customize dining solutions that meet the unique needs of your students and faculty.
Advertisement
A Complete Reading & Math Diagnostic Assessment Solution

Based on scientific research, the GRADE and GMADE suite of products provides everything you need to assess, plan, and deliver your focused instruction in reading and math and will lead your classrooms to reportable success. Learn More.
Advertisement
DreamBox Learning Pre-K-5 Math

DreamBox Learning combines rigorous elementary mathematics with a motivating learning environment and the revolutionary Intelligent Adaptive Learning™ platform. This innovative technology dynamically adapts and individualizes mathematics instruction in real time, empowering students to master key concepts, increase achievement and experience long-lasting confidence. And now, DreamBox Learning Math for iPad – Coming Fall 2013!


Admins predict changes in rigor, instruction under Common Core
eSchool News
A new report from the Center on Education Policy finds that states are actively working to implement the Common Core State Standards through planning, professional development, and technical assistance, although many adopting states said they are struggling to find enough resources and manpower to implement the new standards effectively. The report surveyed 40 states, of which all are adopting the Common Core State Standards English/language arts standards, and 39 of the responding states are adopting the math standards. All surveyed states said they agreed that implementing the Common Core State Standards will improve student achievement because the standards are more rigorous than their previous standards.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Study: Kids hurt during sports once every 25 seconds
CBS News
Many childhoods would not be complete without youth sports. But, a new study from Safe Kids Worldwide reminds parents that kids can get hurt in the field of play — about once every 25 seconds. About 1.35 million emergency room visits due to severe sports injuries occur each year, according to Safe Kids, making up 20 percent of all injury-related ER visits for children and adolescents. "We uncovered some surprising and disturbing data about how often our kids are being injured playing sports," Kate Carr, president and CEO of Safe Kids Worldwide, said in a statement.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE






Federal guidance expected on waiver renewals
Education Week
Federal guidance is likely to be issued by the end of the month for states to renew their waivers from provisions of the No Child Left Behind Act, the head of the U.S. Department of Education’s Student Achievement and School Accountability office told state officials at a recent conference. Speaking at the annual summer meeting of the National Association of State Title I Directors in Washington, D.C., held July 30-Aug. 2, Monique Chism, the director of the achievement and accountability office, said the document was undergoing final clearance by the Office of Management and Budget. This is the last step before the department can release it to the states.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
More schools use cellphones as learning tools
USA Today
Although schools have traditionally banned or limited cellphones in the classroom, 73 percent of Advanced Placement and National Writing Project teachers said their students use phones in the classroom or to complete assignments, according to a Pew Research Center study.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
8 ways kindergarten holds the key to 21st century instruction
eSchool News
Sam Gliksman, a contributor for eSchool News, writes: "I was recently giving a workshop at a local elementary school. While walking around and speaking to teachers and children, it suddenly dawned on me that several of the 'revolutionary' educational changes we've been calling for have actually been around for quite a while — just talk a stroll down to the kindergarten classes.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Debating iPads or Chromebooks for 1:1? Why not both?
THE Journal
As more school districts consider 1:1 initiatives, they are faced with the decision of which device to roll out. Chromebooks and iPads are two popular choices, but instead of choosing between them, some innovative school districts are deploying both.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more



Obama administration aloof as lawmakers tangle over ESEA
Education Week
Not since passage of the No Child Left Behind Act in 2001 has Congress been so outwardly engaged in K-12 policy, yet most advocates remain pessimistic that there will be a new version of the flagship federal education law anytime soon. A big part of the reason: The Obama administration has little incentive to see a bill to revise the Elementary and Secondary Education Act advance in the current legislative climate, in which lawmakers seem more likely to erode, rather than support, the president's policy priorities. Congress has been working on two highly partisan ESEA bills — one of which, the GOP-backed House measure, President Barack Obama has threatened to veto.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Tax dollars for private school tuition gain in states
Stateline via The Huffington Post
Opponents called it a "bombshell" and "sleaziness." Backers said it was "historic" and would free low-income students from failing public schools. Hyperbole aside, the Alabama Legislature's last-minute move to create a $3,500 state tax credit for private school tuition is emblematic of a growing movement in the states. Thirteen states created or expanded tuition tax credits, private school scholarships or traditional vouchers in 2013, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. Eight states did so in 2012 and seven states in 2011, according to the group.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Think Ahead. See Ahead. Be Ahead.

To transform math education, a radically different approach is required. ST Math® instructional software is that approach. But ST Math isn't just unique because of its visual approach to teaching math. It sets the standard for a blended learning solution, and enables teachers to help all students be successful learners.
 


Report: 75 percent of Detroit schools don't provide adequate education
WWJ-TV
An annual ranking shows that only one-quarter of the schools in Detroit are providing an adequate education for its students. Excellent Schools Detroit — a coalition of leaders in many different areas, ranging from education, philanthropic and community groups — releases a yearly scorecard to help parents make sense of the city's school system and find the best fit for their child. The organization's scorecard on Detroit schools for 2013 found that — of the 204 schools graded — 51 earned "C+" or higher.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


States train teachers on Common Core
Stateline
Hardly a week goes by without controversy about Common Core, the academic standards for English and math that nearly all states have adopted. The standards for each grade level are intended to prepare every high school graduate for college or a career.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  FEATURED COMPANIES
Advertisement
Troops to Teachers

Let a Veteran bring leadership, experience, and maturity to your school. Make a difference in the classrooms of your school and do it for your students hire a Troops to Teacher!
Contact Troops to Teachers TTT@navy.mil
Advertisement
Teacher Evaluations Made Easy!

Helping hundreds of school districts improve teacher performance, Halogen eAppraisal Education makes teacher evaluations easy and manageable. Book a
Free Trial of Halogen’s award winning software today.


A $147 million signal of faith in Atlanta's public schools
The New York Times
The most expensive public high school ever built in Georgia opened in an old I.B.M. office building. With 11 stories, a 900-car parking deck and views fit for a corporate executive, the school, North Atlanta High, looks very much like the fancy office buildings and glittery shopping strips that populate its Buckhead community. The school cost about $147 million. That is small change compared with the Robert F. Kennedy high school complex in Los Angeles, built in 2010 for $578 million — a figure critics liked to point out was more expensive than Beijing's Olympic stadium.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Test scores sink as New York adopts tougher benchmarks
The New York Times
The number of New York students passing state reading and math exams dropped drastically this year, education officials reported on Wednesday, unsettling parents, principals and teachers and posing new challenges to a national effort to toughen academic standards. In New York City, 26 percent of students in third through eighth grade passed the tests in English, and 30 percent passed in math, according to the New York State Education Department.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE






Early moves that create a continuum of success
NAESP
Brain research has identified the skills that children must develop at early ages to have a strong foundation for learning. In the latest edition of NAESP Radio, psychologist and author Deborah Leong explores how principals can help teachers develop these skills in their students. Listen now as she shares with NAESP Executive Director Gail Connelly how to support young learners' brain development.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


NAESP congratulates the 2013 class of National Distinguished Principals
NAESP
NAESP's National Distinguished Principals program was established in 1984 to recognize and celebrate elementary and middle-level principals who set high standards for instruction and student achievement in their learning communities. Read about this year's class of 62 outstanding principals from around the country, who will be honored in a special program this October in Washington, D.C.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
 


Before the Bell is a benefit of your membership in the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). For information about other member benefits, visit www.naesp.org or contact us at naesp@naesp.org.

Before the Bell is a digest of the most important news selected for NAESP from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The presence of such advertising does not endorse, or imply endorsement of, any products or services by NAESP. Neither NAESP nor Multiview is liable for the use of or reliance on any information contained in this briefing.

Feedback about an article? Contact NAESP Liaison Meredith Barnett at MBarnett@naesp.org.
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601   Download media kit
This edition of Before the Bell was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here.

NAESP | 1615 Duke Street | Alexandria, VA 22314 | www.naesp.org | 800-386-2377
Recent issues
Aug. 6, 2013
Aug. 2, 2013
July 30, 2013
July 26, 2013



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063