This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.


Advertisement


  Mobile version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit Aug. 23, 2013

Curriculum    School Leadership   Federal Advocacy & Policy   In the States   Association News   Buy Books   Contact NAESP


Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement


Moving
To Success

Moving To Success embraces the belief that students who become competent movers and are knowledgeable regarding the health-related benefits of being physically active are more likely to lead a physically active lifestyle. 864-680-8471
MORE



 



Georgia school shooting averted by a brave bookkeeper — and prayer
The Christian Science Monitor
A 20-year-old gunman who was talked into surrendering his assault rifle by a cool-as-a-cucumber bookkeeper after he allegedly stormed a school in Dekalb County, Ga., on Tuesday told police afterwards, "I'm sorry, I'm off my meds." Coming as America's schoolchildren begin filtering back to school for a new year, the shots fired at the Ronald E. McNair Discovery Learning Academy by a possibly unstable young man with a deadly arsenal may have only reinforced perceptions that people experiencing mental illness pose a serious risk to children's safety.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




Back to class: 3 ways school meals and snacks will look different
Time
With the average American child spending up more than 20 hours a week in school, it follows that they're doing a good part of their daily eating there as well. Here's an update on changes that state and federal health officials are making to ensure that what kids are noshing on in between class nourishes their bodies as well as their brains.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Report: Science standards fall short in aligning to math Common Core
Education Week
A Washington think tank concludes in a new report that the Next Generation Science Standards fail to adequately align with the mathematics expectations put forth in the Common Core. In addition, the same organization, the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, has just issued a state-by-state look at how the new science standards compare with the current ones in most states, as well as several states with standards Fordham deems "exemplary."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement
PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  TRYING TO MAKE SENSE OF THE COMMON CORE?

Watch this two-minute video to learn about the simplest way to implement and teach the Common Core Standards.

CLICK HERE TO WATCH
 


Apps for English language learning: Photo apps for customized learning content
By Beth Crumpler
The first article of this series was an introduction to photo-editing apps for instructional support. This second article covers the use of photo apps for creating customized images in learning content. Learning content can be created by instructors for lessons and for homework. Creating customized images using photo apps can enhance your instructional content. Images are much easier to modify and customize using a photo app compared to using a computer.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Report: Public fuzzy on Common Core State Standards
eSchool News
At a time when most U.S. public schools are implementing the Common Core State Standards, a new report finds that Americans don't know what the Common Core State Standards are, and that they say more testing is not going to help students. These are just some of the findings of the 45th annual PDK/Gallup Poll on the Public's Attitudes Toward the Public Schools — the longest-running survey of American attitudes toward education, providing an extensive repository of data.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT




What is and is not fair
Connected Principals Blog (commentary)
Shawn Blankenship, a contributor for Connected Principals Blog, writes: "Throughout my many conversations with teachers, I have heard time and time again how they feel it's not fair for the rest of the class that they have to spend much time and energy on just a few disruptive students. These teachers are correct, it's not fair."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    How peanuts became Public Health Enemy No. 1 (Education Week)
Empathy: The most important back-to-school supply (Edutopia)
Just how effective are the Common Core State Standards? (eSchool News)
Why are so many students bored? (Psychology Today (commentary))
School security tightens in wake of Sandy Hook (Stateline via The Huffington Post)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


  FEATURED COMPANIES
Advertisement
Your Fundamental Solution for Improving Instruction

"The Fundamental 5 maximizes teacher effectiveness. It is the best instructional system I have ever observed." Robert Brezina, U.S. Academic Decathlon Past President.
Order now on Amazon.com
Advertisement
Safer,Faster, Easier Dismissal Procedures


ON SALE NOW

For Educators and Concerned Parents


CarRider Signs, CarRider Tags, SCoolBus Tags, AfterSCool Tags & Walker Tags and more.
Click here to learn more now.


Survey's don't build trust ... Leaders do
Education Week
Schools are using surveys as a source of evidence to inform change. But, surveys have value only when asking the right questions, in the right way, reporting and acting on results. Surveys are designed to gather input. In service of our mission, they can make a real contribution. But even after collecting important and guiding information, the next step is to act upon it and make a difference as a result. Professional survey developers know how to write questions that get to the information we need in order to improve practice. But even if we use surveys, they capture thoughts from only a moment in time.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword LEADERS.


Is it time to get rid of IQ tests in schools?
NPR
Schools have long used IQ tests to group students. But some experts say labels like "gifted" or "disabled" are following students throughout their education — for better and worse. Guest host Celeste Headlee finds out more.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




From pet therapy to yoga, schools address kids' stress
USA Today
As school counselor Jennifer VonLintel gears up for the start of the school year at B.F. Kitchen Elementary School, there are new students to enroll, files to update and schedules to plan — including the schedule for Copper, her registered therapy dog and a popular presence in the hallways of the Loveland, Colo., school. Three days a week, the 3-year-old golden retriever's assignments can include mingling with kids during recess, being assigned to students who struggle with reading or math anxiety, and providing general companionship and support in the classroom, during counseling office visits, and during after-school programs. Any time a friendly, furry face can provide an extra measure of comfort and assurance, says VonLintel.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


After tragedy, schools turn to technology
The Wall Street Journal
Ever since the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Connecticut last December, school officials across the country have debated how best to improve safety, including whether to arm teachers. The debate intensified when a gunman walked into a DeKalb County, Ga., elementary school, barricaded himself in the front office and fired multiple shots at police before being taken into custody. No one was injured. Many schools are opening their doors this semester with an option less controversial than arming teachers: panic buttons. At least 400 schools in a dozen states, from California to Maine, are adding the devices, according to administrators.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  PRODUCT SHOWCASES
Advertisement
Customized Solutions with Students in Mind.

With more than 60 restaurants, over 65 years of guest service experience in the retail restaurant industry and over 80 food service locations, Piccadilly Food Service has the ability to customize dining solutions that meet the unique needs of your students and faculty.
Advertisement
A Complete Reading & Math Diagnostic Assessment Solution

Based on scientific research, the GRADE and GMADE suite of products provides everything you need to assess, plan, and deliver your focused instruction in reading and math and will lead your classrooms to reportable success. Learn More.
Advertisement
DreamBox Learning Pre-K-5 Math

DreamBox Learning combines rigorous elementary mathematics with a motivating learning environment and the revolutionary Intelligent Adaptive Learning™ platform. This innovative technology dynamically adapts and individualizes mathematics instruction in real time, empowering students to master key concepts, increase achievement and experience long-lasting confidence. And now, DreamBox Learning Math for iPad – Coming Fall 2013!


Building classroom community amongst the machines
Edutopia (commentary)
There's no denying that most of us are engrossed daily with technology. The attachment is evident in just about every public place. Mobile devices, for many of us, have become our closest friend. In April, the Telegraph reported on toddlers becoming so addicted to their iPads that they required therapy. While this is an extreme case, it's not too far from reality. The mobile device has become our community hub. It's where we go for information and to socialize. It's the new water cooler. In short, our most intimate relationship is with a machine.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Study: Non-classroom costs eat up half of K-12 spending
Nashville Post
Almost half the dollars school districts take in across the state for educational expenses never find their way into the classroom, according to a new Beacon Center study. In a report arguing taxpayers have been misled over how their education dollars are spent, the free-market think tank found 54 percent of dollars funneled into Tennessess's public education systems for the 2011-2012 school year were used on expenses like textbooks, supplies, plus salaries and benefits for teachers and other classroom personnel. The rest was spent on costs like administration, overhead costs, capital outlay and debt service, according to the study.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




School districts get creative to cut costs
The Philadelphia Inquirer
When schools open, students in Bristol Township will be hopping onto a fleet of new buses fueled by propane. Beyond being more environmentally friendly, the buses are expected to generate a significant saving: The two-year contract the Bucks County district negotiated for propane sets the price at $1.50 per gallon, according to district Superintendent Samuel Lee, and the district has submitted a grant proposal to further lower costs. Bristol, like many local districts, can use all the help it can get: As reported in The Inquirer last month, despite rising property-tax rates, the district had to close a $9 million gap to balance its 2013-2014 budget.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Polls show mixed report card for education reforms
Politico
Americans have a decidedly mixed view of the education reforms now sweeping the nation, supporting moves to open up public schools to more competition — and yet wary of ceding too much control to market forces. That's the message that emerges from a trio of new polls on public education.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE






Feds urge schools to tackle bullying of kids with disabilities
Disability Scoop
In new guidance sent to educators across the country, federal education officials say that schools may be liable if they don't properly address bullying of students with disabilities. The guidance issued Tuesday in a four-page "Dear Colleague" letter details the unique obligations that schools have under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act to ensure that children with disabilities are not victimized. Specifically, officials from the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services said that bullying can lead to a denial of a student's right to a free and appropriate public education, or FAPE, if it "results in the student not receiving meaningful educational benefit."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Polls show mixed report card for education reforms
Politico
Americans have a decidedly mixed view of the education reforms now sweeping the nation, supporting moves to open up public schools to more competition — and yet wary of ceding too much control to market forces.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
The best back-to-school apps for middle school students
The Huffington Post
Finding high-quality and appropriate educational apps for middle schoolers is tricky business. Preteens are no longer engaged by rudimentary games and childish characters, yet still lack the skills and discipline to take on more complex, high school-oriented subjects.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
New principals for at least 24 DCPS schools
The Washington Post
Washington, D.C., public schools officials reported in late May that 16 city schools would open this fall with new principals. Since then, one of those schools reported a sharp rise in test scores and its principal was reappointed.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more



District Race to the Top: Big promises, challenges, new report finds
Education Week
The American Institutes for Research has published a new analysis of the common threads — and challenges — woven through the 16 winning applications in last year's first Race to the Top contest for districts. The potentially game-changing nature of these grants (worth $400 million in all) has been detailed before, and includes the promise of individualized college and career plans for every student, mobile devices for take-home use, and a blended-learning environment in every classroom. The goal of the Race to the Top for districts — a contest whose second round is underway now — is to bring personalized learning to more students.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


US schools need more STEM training, better broadband
CIO
U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan renewed the administration's call for super-fast broadband connections in schools and a greater focus on education in the STEM subjects of science, technology, engineering and math. In a video address to participants in Maker Camp, an online summer camp for teenagers, Duncan hailed the virtual program, saying that "it shows the power of online learning."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Think Ahead. See Ahead. Be Ahead.

To transform math education, a radically different approach is required. ST Math® instructional software is that approach. But ST Math isn't just unique because of its visual approach to teaching math. It sets the standard for a blended learning solution, and enables teachers to help all students be successful learners.
 




Virginia reading scores drop by double digits on new SOL test
The Washington Post
Reading scores for the Virginia Standards of Learning test dropped by double digits following the introduction of a new, more rigorous exam this past year, according to test results by the Virginia Department of Education. Overall, 75 percent of students passed the grade-level reading test, compared with 89 percent the previous year. Declines in reading scores were more pronounced in elementary and middle school than in high school. On sixth- and seventh-grade tests, every school district in the state did worse than the previous year, a Washington Post analysis found.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Detroit schools may not be paying more for bonds after city's bankruptcy filing
The Detroit News
It'll cost Detroit Public Schools about $3.6 million extra to issue a bunch of one-year bonds to run the schools this school year — and that's the good news. According to a spokesman for the state Treasury Department, the fact that Michigan is paying close to a 4 percent premium when compared to similar bonds issued by California isn't bad news, because last year the state paid even more. The news appears to contradict the widely held assumption that Detroit schools are paying more for bonds now after being tainted by the city's July bankruptcy filing.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  FEATURED COMPANIES
Advertisement
Troops to Teachers

Let a Veteran bring leadership, experience, and maturity to your school. Make a difference in the classrooms of your school and do it for your students hire a Troops to Teacher!
Contact Troops to Teachers TTT@navy.mil
Advertisement
Teacher Evaluations Made Easy!

Helping hundreds of school districts improve teacher performance, Halogen eAppraisal Education makes teacher evaluations easy and manageable. Book a
Free Trial of Halogen’s award winning software today.


Los Angeles Unified union, district at odds over best way to train teachers for Common Core
EdSource
Both Los Angeles Unified officials and the union representing teachers agree that the bulk of one-time state money for the transition to the Common Core standards should be spent on teacher training. They disagree over how best to provide it. In a debate that will likely be repeated in districts across California, the district is proposing that a sizable piece of the $113 million coming its way should create a network of teacher specialists who'll lead the charge for implementing the new English language arts and math standards. United Teachers Los Angeles wants all of the money sent to school sites for full-day trainings and collaboration.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


California law protecting K-12 transgender students gets mixed response
Contra Costa Times
California's law to give transgender K-12 students rights such as access to the restrooms and locker rooms that they choose has received mixed response from school officials. Gov. Jerry Brown signed AB 1266, which says schools must allow a student to participate in sex-segregated programs, athletics and to use facilities "consistent with his or her gender identity, irrespective of the gender listed on the pupil's records." The law, the first one in the nation, is on the leading edge of transgender rights, said Carlos Alcala, an aide to Assemblyman Tom Ammiano, D-San Francisco, who wrote the bill. Opponents, who have promised to sue, said the bill infringes on the privacy of public school students.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




4 tech takeaways from the 2013 NAESP Conference
NAESP
NAESP's 2013 Annual Conference in Baltimore buzzed with great ideas and insights. One major theme throughout the conference was the ever-changing role of technology in education. Conference blogger Kimberlyn Pratesi wrote a post about the "discussion of how technology has changed the dynamic of professional learning." But what are some of those tech-driven changes, and what do they mean for educators?
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Apply for $5,00 Sharing the Dream grant
NAESP
NAESP has again partnered with the MetLife Foundation to offer the Sharing the Dream grant program. Schools have an opportunity to win $5,000 grants to support global learning projects that engage children in transformative, multidisciplinary learning experiences. The deadline for submitting a proposal is Sept. 11, 2013.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
 


Before the Bell is a benefit of your membership in the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). For information about other member benefits, visit www.naesp.org or contact us at naesp@naesp.org.

Before the Bell is a digest of the most important news selected for NAESP from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The presence of such advertising does not endorse, or imply endorsement of, any products or services by NAESP. Neither NAESP nor Multiview is liable for the use of or reliance on any information contained in this briefing.

Feedback about an article? Contact NAESP Liaison Meredith Barnett at MBarnett@naesp.org.
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601   Download media kit
This edition of Before the Bell was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here.

NAESP | 1615 Duke Street | Alexandria, VA 22314 | www.naesp.org | 800-386-2377
Recent issues
Aug. 20, 2013
Aug. 16, 2013
Aug. 13, 2013
Aug. 9, 2013



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063