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In push for Common Core, many parents left uneducated
NPR
Forty-five states have adopted the Common Core State Standards, the first-ever national academic standards for students. But opposition is growing, and some lawmakers are having second thoughts about their states' support. Meanwhile, proponents of the standards are still struggling to explain the initiative to parents, many of whom say they've never even heard of the Common Core.
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Connected Educator Month is coming — What will you do?
Connected Principals Blog
Patrick Larkin, a contributor for Connected Principals Blog, writes: "If you are reading this post, the odds are that you are already somewhat of a 'connected educator.' Of course, if you are 'connected' then you know that there are some responsibilities that come along with that designation. One of the primary tasks of a connected educator is to help others learn about the tremendous rewards inherent in online social learning."
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How to grab and keep girls' interest in computer coding
MindShift
There's growing and well-founded concern about the gender gap in science, technology, engineering and math fields, particularly when it comes to women of color. Women's participation in computer science careers has actually decreased since the 1980s. Right now, about 20 percent of all programmers are women and while women make up 57 percent of undergraduates they represent only 18 percent of the computer science majors. Meanwhile, a STEM Connector report from 2012-2013 predicts that 8.65 million jobs in 2018 will be in STEM fields. That growth makes the gender disparity numbers especially troubling.
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Initiative promotes Civil Rights history with free documentaries
Education Week
A new initiative from the National Endowment for the Humanities will provide schools and communities with free access to documentaries that trace the history of the civil rights movement, from the first seeds of change that sprouted in the 1820s to the 1967 Supreme Court decision that overturned the ban on interracial marriage. The website was launched this week, and comes in the wake of the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation and the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington.
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6 back-to-school lessons for leaders
FoxBusiness
There's something special about the first month of the school year. How can leaders take advantage of the back-to-school spirit? Here are six ideas to consider. No. 1: Step back from the day-to-day and focus on change and growth. Remember how there were always a few kids who came back after summer break and seemed like different people? Maybe they'd grown six inches, or their voice had changed, or their taste in clothes had completely shifted. None of those changes would have been nearly as noticeable if you'd been watching them gradually happen every day. You may not be able to take three months away, but try to look at the people and things around you with a fresh perspective. When you see that someone has excelled, be sure to encourage them.
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3 tips for integrating tools at the start of school
Edutopia
The school year has started, and teachers across the country are excited to try out all the cool new tools they learned about during their "summer off." It's great to know there are so many educators out there ready to introduce something new and exciting in their classroom, but here are three tips to help you make sure that you get the most out of them.
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10 essential tips for meeting technology needs of low-income schools
MindShift
Educators who work in low-income schools understand technology could help them understand student needs better and create more engaging learning experiences. But tight budgets make some of the more ambitious schemes, like one-to-one computer, access a distant dream. Yet it's precisely the schools with under-served student populations that stand to gain the most from technology. Class sizes are often large and teachers are looking for ways to keep the class engaged and focused when they work one-on-one with a struggling student. Smart use of technology could save them time with grading and tracking student progress, for example. Still some high-needs schools are only just beginning to push for school technology.
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How music can improve memory
MindShift
The best way to remember facts might be to set them to music. Medical students, for example, have long used rhymes and songs to help them master vast quantities of information, and we've just gotten fresh evidence of how effective this strategy can be. A young British doctor, Tapas Mukherjee of Glenfield Hospital in Leicester, was distressed by a survey showing that 55 percent of nurses and doctors at Glenfield were not following hospital guidelines on the management of asthma; 38 percent were not even aware that the guidelines existed.
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Study: Afterschool offerings in many cities need better coordination
Education Week
Turns out that working together is something that afterschool providers can work on, a new study suggests. Based on an examination of 100 large cities, it finds that while citywide coordination of afterschool programs is on the rise, many cities should do more on this front. The study, conducted by FHI 360, a nonprofit education research group, also argues that mayoral support is crucial to expanding and improving those programs.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Can emotional intelligence be taught? (The New York Times)
A state-by-state look at top education-technology initiatives (eSchool News)
Study: Kindergarten 'redshirting' less common than previously reported (The Washington Post)
11 tips on teaching Common Core critical vocabulary (Edutopia)
States tackle chronic absence in schools (Stateline)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Is it time to get rid of desks in the classroom?
EdTech Magazine
The desk, like the chalkboard, has been a iconic symbol of the classroom. But the chalkboard has long since given way to interactive whiteboards, document cameras and projectors. For the most part, though, the school desk remains entrenched in the U.S. school system. But some voices in education are starting to call for an end to the ball and chain of the desk in favor of free-range learning.
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Want to flip communication?
Education Week (commentary)
Parents cannot always make it to the PTA meetings or night events. Some of them work ... Others cannot get child care or have hardships going on that prevent them from making it to some school events. They make it to their child's performances, but they have to pick and choose what they can attend.
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Schoolhouse architecture gets hip
The Wall Street Journal
It is a drill familiar to generations: The school bell rings between classes and students scatter. Like a building-wide game of musical chairs, everyone must be in their seats again before the ringing stops. But a new crop of students are sitting down in surprising places — including unsupervised benches tucked next to lockers, artificial lawns spread outside classrooms and leather couches more reminiscent of living rooms than schools. It is just one of the many ways new schools across the country are using building design to reflect rapidly shifting beliefs about how children learn best. In New York more than a dozen new public and private schools either recently opened or will open in the next few years, showing off designs that radically rethink the traditional school building.
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Schools need help with technology
eSchool News
Technology is many things: Exciting. Innovative. Interesting. A time-killer. Students are drawn to it. Without question, technology is the greatest learning tool since pen and paper. There is very little to criticize when it comes to the technological advancements we've all experienced in the last 15 years. But with everything, there is usually a downside. For technology, the truth is, it's expensive — very expensive.
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E-Rate changes spur debate
eSchool News
Hundreds of E-Rate stakeholders made final efforts to show how critical high-speed broadband connections are for teaching and learning before a Sept. 16 deadline to submit comments to the Federal Communications Commission. The FCC had asked for feedback on a variety of proposals to improve the E-Rate, so the $2.3 billion-a-year federal school wiring program can support President Barack Obama's plan to connect 99 percent of America's students to the internet through high-speed broadband service within five years. Currently, the E-Rate meets only a small fraction of the network infrastructure needs of K-12 schools nationwide.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword SCHOOL TECHNOLOGY.


Federal funding targets technology for students with disabilities
THE Journal
A new $1.4 million federal grant will fund the establishment of a Center on Technology and Disability. The goal of the award is to help children with disabilities, their families, and their schools to access and use assistive technology to improve learning outcomes. The grant, administered by the United States Department of Education's Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, was funded through the Technology and Media Services for Individuals with Disabilities program, authorized under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. It was awarded to Family Health International, which will operate the center along with American Institutes for Research and PACER Center.
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TRENDING ARTICLE
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E-Rate changes spur debate
eSchool News
Hundreds of E-Rate stakeholders made final efforts to show how critical high-speed broadband connections are for teaching and learning before a Sept. 16 deadline to submit comments to the Federal Communications Commission.

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School districts struggle to get principals to stay put
NPR
At Milwaukee Parkside School for the Arts on the south side of Milwaukee, kids are back in class and getting their bearings in the sprawling building. So is Lila Hillman, the school's brand-new principal.

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Duncan to principals: Shouldn't have to sacrifice your lives for job
Education Week
U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan yesterday told hundreds of elementary and middle school principals who are gathered here for a conference that they shouldn't have to fear for their lives on the job.

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Department awards $30 million in grants to support teacher and principal development
Office of Innovation and Improvement
U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan announced nearly $30 million for six grant awards to improve student achievement by increasing the effectiveness of teachers and principals. The national nonprofits funded under the Supporting Effective Educators Development program, will enhance preparation of pre-service teachers, provide professional development to in-service teachers and leaders, and disseminate best practices, ultimately serving approximately 27,000 teachers and principals, reaching a significant number of students across all 50 states.
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Common Core Standards to change Connecticut's education landscape
The Hartford Courant
A sweeping change now underway quietly in Connecticut is transforming school curriculum from kindergarten through 12th grade with the aim of raising achievement and ensuring that all students are ready for college and career. The new Common Core State Standards — a set of academic goals that were developed by the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers — are driving the changes. Along with 44 other states, Connecticut adopted those standards after they were issued in 2010.
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Dan Patrick defends charter school bill before SBOE
The Texas Tribune
Key charter school legislation would not have passed during the last legislative session without a provision removing much of the State Board of Education's authority in approving applications, Senate Education Chairman Dan Patrick, R-Houston, said Wednesday. Defending the change at a state board meeting, Patrick told members it was the result of a compromise needed to get the bill through both chambers.
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Washington schools fail to keep eye on potential test cheating
The Seattle Times
Each school year, Washington education officials receive, at most, a handful of allegations that teachers cheated to inflate student scores on state tests. Many years, they receive none at all. Officials attribute that record to how well they train school-district staff in test security, and how those people, in turn, train their teachers and principals. They also praise the honesty of the teachers and other staff members who proctor the dozens of state-required tests that Washington students take each year.
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Florida school counselors urged to end stigma over mental illness
Sun Sentinel
A seminar that encouraged counselors to alter the stigma of mental illness at their schools assumed a special urgency as a rash of shootings, most recently at the Washington Navy Yard, focuses the nation's attention on mental health. More than 100 elementary school counselors in the Palm Beach County School District learned a new curriculum aimed at fourth- and fifth-graders called "Breaking The Silence: Teaching the Next Generation About Mental Illness."
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Submit a proposal for the 2014 NAESP conference
NAESP
Share your favorite best practices with elementary and middle-level principals from across the country at the 2014 NAESP Conference. Submit a proposal to present a concurrent session at the conference, which will be held July 10-12, 2014, in Nashville. Proposals will be accepted until Oct. 31.
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Explore early learning and creativity with Principal magazine
NAESP
The September/November issue of NAESP's flagship magazine focuses on developing a continuum of learning for pre-K-3 students. Explore the importance of play in early education, tips for building foundations for literacy, and strategies to maximize staff collaboration. Plus, don't miss this issue's special supplement on creativity.
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Before the Bell is a digest of the most important news selected for NAESP from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The presence of such advertising does not endorse, or imply endorsement of, any products or services by NAESP. Neither NAESP nor Multiview is liable for the use of or reliance on any information contained in this briefing.

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