This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.


Advertisement


Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit October 03, 2014

Curriculum    School Leadership   Federal Advocacy & Policy   In the States   Association News   Buy Books   Contact NAESP


Advertisement


Let Kids Fly with ZipKrooz™


ZipKrooz™ brings zip line-like adventure to the playground in an exciting, inclusive and safe way!


 

Advertisement



New federal guidelines aim to rid schools of racial inequality
The New York Times
With racial minorities still less likely than white students to have access to rigorous academic classes or experienced and qualified teachers, the Obama administration will announce guidelines on Wednesday to ensure that strong teachers, high-level math and science courses, quality extracurricular programs, and equivalent technology and school facilities are available for all public school students.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




Are districts ready for new assessment standards?
EdTech Magazine
The Common Core State Standards initiated a major shift in how schools collect and analyze student data. Now all major assessments are moving online to reduce costs, release results faster, and better capture and analyze student performance data to help teachers personalize learning. For students to succeed on these assessments, systems and resources must be aligned, and students and teachers must use them from the beginning of this school year onward.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Finding overlap in the common math, language arts and science standards
Education Week
A few years ago, Tina Cheuk, a project manager for the Understanding Language initiative at Stanford University, woke up one morning, printed out several new sets of standards, and started cutting. "I was frustrated," she said in a phone interview. Looking at the Common Core State Standards in English/language arts and math, along with the framework that would become the Next Generation Science Standards, she said, "I felt overwhelmed. And that was my full-time job looking at standards."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keywords COMMON CORE.


SPONSORED CONTENT


10 ways to boost brain power for young students
eSchool News
Research into neuroscience and brain power is among the most fascinating due to its impact on education. And when it comes to young learners, strategies for optimizing brain development are essential for educators and parents. Young students up to age 5 are uniquely poised to absorb an incredible amount of information, and while their brains are growing and forming at rapid rates, they also need to feel secure and calm to optimize positive brain development, said Pam Schiller, a curriculum specialist and freelance author specializing in early childhood education, during an edWeb webinar.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Drilling down on education data
District Administration Magazine
A new bounty of academic data is guiding teachers as they adjust instruction in the hopes of boosting student achievement. Some districts are connecting "data coaches" with the teachers' own professional learning communities to ensure this bounty of information fulfills its pedagogical promise. Using portions of the $4 billion Race to the Top initiative, educators in Delaware, Rhode Island, Hawaii and other states have been working with data coaches — many of whom are former teachers — to learn how to parse data to plan lessons and reach end-of-year academic benchmarks, among other short- and long-term goals.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement
PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  A Perfect Match to the SBAC Test Specs

Common Core Standards Plus covers ALL Strands and
Domains in ONE easy-to-use resource. With content at
every DOK level
in a progression of rigor and relevance,
it’s everything your teachers and students need to prepare
for the SBAC.

Learn More – View the SBAC Correlation Chart
 


First steps at protecting students' privacy
Connected Principals (commentary)
Lyn Hilt, a contributor for Connected Principals blog, writes: "I admit that at one point in time I was one of those educators who allowed students to sign into a site using a teacher's credentials in order to gain access, for example, some of our intermediate students used Prezi for project work and signed in under the same generic Gmail account maintained by the teacher."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Why professional development sessions must include real experiences
Center for Teaching Quality (commentary)
This year, nearly every teacher in America will experience hours and hours of prepared, often mandatory professional development sessions. The range will be huge — from useful to not very, from inspiring to practical, to grating or sleep inducing. Many teacher leaders are moving into roles that require them to lead professional development workshops for teachers. There is so much potential to spread expertise around our profession, but how do you create a great PD session?
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Lessening school assessment stress (District Administration Magazine)
Should schools be responsible for kids' health? (The Atlantic)
Rx for bullying: Positive behavior programs that build trust and support (School Transportation News)
With the right technology, can children teach themselves? (MindShift)
Principals: 5 ways to create a more inclusive school climate (Education Week)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Study: ADHD can hamper school performance as early as 2nd grade
HealthDay News via U.S. News & World Report
Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder can harm a child's academic performance and social skills as early as the second grade, a new Australian study contends. Children between 6 and 8 years old who were tested and scored high for ADHD symptoms were more likely to get lower grades in elementary school and have trouble fitting in with other kids, compared with children without ADHD, the study authors reported. Kids with ADHD also were more likely to have other mental health or developmental disorders, including anxiety, depression and autism, according to the study.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  PRODUCT SHOWCASES
Advertisement
Customized Solutions with Students in Mind

At Piccadilly Food Service, we have the ability to customize dining solutions that meet the unique needs of your students and faculty. With approximately 60 restaurants, over 80 years of guest experience in the retail restaurant industry and over 80 food service locations, Piccadilly Food Service has the food your students and faculty want.
Advertisement
50% Profit Reusable Bag Fundraisers

Mixed Bag Designs green fundraising programs are easy and profitable. The colorful reusable bags and stylish accessories are easy-to-sell, quality products. Mixed Bag Designs offers profit programs up to 50% plus free shipping on your main order, with orders sorted by seller. Go green with a Mixed Bag Designs fundraiser.
Advertisement
Easy, Affordable Technology - Endless Possibilities

Want an easy way to add technology to hands-on STEM lessons? Ward’s Single Probes is the solution. The only modular probeware designed for elementary and middle school users, Ward’s Single Probes makes probeware easy, flexible and affordable, with nine interchangeable probes, universal connectivity to any device, and optional Wi-Fi. Learn More at wardsci.com/singleprobes


Kids and screen time: Cutting through the static
NPR
The walls are lined with robots and movie posters for "Star Wars" and "Back to the Future." But this is no 1980s nerd den. It's the technology lab at Westside Neighborhood School in Los Angeles, and the domain of its ed-tech coordinator, Don Fitz-Roy. "So we're gonna be talking about digital citizenship today." Fitz-Roy is a mountain of a man, bald with just the hint of a goatee. Of the half-dozen students sitting in small, plastic chairs around him, any three could easily fit inside his shirt. And he's trying to keep them safe — from the Internet.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Is it bullying, or ordinary meanness?
Psychology Today (commentary)
Eileen Kennedy-Moore, Ph.D., a contributor for Psychology Today, writes: "If you say the word 'bullying' in a classroom full of elementary school kids, here's what happens: Hands shoot up. Everyone has a story about how someone bullied him or her. Bullying is a serious problem that can have devastating effects. As a clinician, I've seen more than a few adult clients brought to tears by memories of horrifying peer abuse. I've seen kids who feel frightened or wounded by their peers' cruel words or actions, and parents who feel angry or helpless in the face of their child's victimization by other kids."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Mining educational data by inventing apps for all to use
The Hechinger Report
One indisputable effect of introducing technology into education has been the generation of unprecedented amounts of electronic data on America's public school students — their attendance, their test scores, their graduation rates, and many other kinds of information that can now be tracked and stored in massive databases. What to do with all this data is another question. The use of students' test score data to evaluate their teachers has already led to controversy, as has the "harvesting" of student data by for-profit companies.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Report urges support for girls' leadership roles
eSchool News
Educators are uniquely positioned to help girls assume leadership roles and overcome stereotypes both in and out of school, according to a new report from the National Education Association. Educator support in helping girls take on leadership roles is essential, especially in middle and high school. The report, based on 2014 NEA survey data, recommends several actions to help educators close the leadership gender gap.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


8 ways school leaders can support the digital transition
eSchool News
Administrators at the local, district and state levels are essential to leading and supporting the digital transition in schools across the nation, and at a Sept. 29 summit, a panel of education leaders outlined a number of key ways that leadership can support and sustain a digital transition. More than 100 educators, policymakers, and stakeholders convened for the Empowering Educators to Enhance Student Learning in the Digital Era, in Washington, D.C., which featured sessions focusing on preparing teachers for digital learning environments, professional development opportunities, and supporting the digital transition from all sides.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  FEATURED COMPANIES
Advertisement
The Fundamental 5 - A Kindle Best Seller

Discover the revolutionary system of daily teacher actions that are transforming 1000's
of classrooms across
the nation. Order now on Amazon.com
Advertisement
Advance your career in Administration!

California University of Pennsylvania is proud to offer 100% online master’s level programs in Education Administration and Leadership, including Principal and Superintendent preparation programs.


The connected educator: It begins with collaboration
Edutopia (commentary)
Collaboration has always been a key component of education both from a teaching standpoint and as a learning method. In the past, collaboration was hindered by space and time. In order to collaborate, people needed to be face to face in the same location. To create those conditions, educators formed groups with common interests. Schools organized their staffs by grade levels or subject areas so that educators could collaborate. Departments within a school collaborated on a regular basis.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


These are the best and worst states for teachers
The Huffington Post
Being a teacher is no walk in the park, but it's better in some states than others. Wyoming is the best state overall for teachers, while North Carolina is the worst, according to a new list from personal finance website Wallethub. Wallethub ranked the best and worst states for teachers using data like average starting teacher salaries and the number of teachers per capita. The site also looked at the average work hours for teachers and the relative safety of different schools. Some critics noted that Wallethub's listing doesn't consider certain metrics. Valerie Strauss at the Washington Post pointed out that the ranking didn't consider teacher job protections or evaluations.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE






Arne Duncan doles out grants to help train turnaround leaders
Education Week
The U.S. Department of Education is giving 12 districts, states, nonprofits or post-secondary institutions $20 million total to meet one of the biggest challenges in K-12: finding, training and keeping good turnaround principals. The money comes straight out of the roughly $500 million Congress allocates to the School Improvement Grant program. The competition was first announced, without much fanfare, back in March. The SIG program requires schools to replace principals that have been on the job for more than three years — but a lot of schools just can't find the right leaders.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


First lady to children: 'Don't be mad' over healthier school lunches
The Hill
First lady Michelle Obama said it was "natural" that kids are "grumbling" over new requirements for schools to fill vending machines and lunch lines with healthier food, but that it would not deter her from improving child nutrition. "Change is hard," the first lady said in an interview with Channel One. "And the thing about highly processed, sugary, salty food is that you get addicted to it. I don't want to just settle because it's hard." The first lady said she knew children "are grumbling because they have to make changes," and said her daughters roll their eyes when she forces them to eat their vegetables.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Are districts ready for new assessment standards?
EdTech Magazine
The Common Core State Standards initiated a major shift in how schools collect and analyze student data. Now all major assessments are moving online to reduce costs, release results faster, and better capture and analyze student performance data to help teachers personalize learning.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Maximizing PLC time to flip your class
District Administration Magazine
Recently, we have been talking with a number of people about how to best implement flipped learning, and one hurdle mentioned over and over by teachers is that they do not have enough time.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
5 apps for today's administrators
eSchool News
Leading a school or a school district is, understandably, an important and critical job. Today's school administrators must keep up to date with learning trends, instructional strategies, technology initiatives, and everything in between.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more




Dallas schools respond to students' possible Ebola exposure
Education Week
Four schools in Dallas will complete a "thorough cleaning" after authorities determined that five students who attend those schools may have had contact with an Ebola patient, the New York Times reported. The schools include a high school, a middle school and two elementary schools. They will remain open, and the cleaning is just a precaution, officials told the Times. The students are among 12 to 18 people who may have had contact with Liberian national Thomas Duncan, who was confirmed as the first patient to test positive for Ebola within the United States, while he was demonstrating symptoms of the illness.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Atlanta cheating scandal moves to the courtroom
The Christian Science Monitor
Prosecutors outlined the case against a dozen former principals, teachers and administrators accused of orchestrating a massive cheating conspiracy in 2009 in Atlanta public schools, as the high-profile trial got under way. Prosecutors had brought charges against 35 individuals in the case, one of the most sweeping and widespread cases of cheating to come to light in U.S. public education. Most of those individuals have pleaded guilty and won't go to trial. According to the charges, educators allegedly used a variety of schemes to inflate students' test scores, including erasing incorrect answers, telling children to change their answers and opening sealed exams ahead of time to coach students on the answers.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




National Principals Month kicks off
NAESP
Starting this week, NAESP is saluting top-notch principals across the nation for National Principals Month. The celebration of National Principals Month continues a five-year tradition launched by NAESP and NASSP in 2009. A resolution from the U.S. Senate has officially recognized the celebration, which honors principals' hard work and dedication to America's schools. NAESP's festivities will culminate with the National Distinguished Principals program, which recognizes outstanding school leaders from around the country. October is also the third annual Connected Educator Month, an initiative to stimulate and support tech innovation for educators. Here's a round-up of the festivities.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Adapt to change: Leadership strategies from Principal magazine
NAESP
The only constant is change. The articles in the September/October issue of Principal magazine explore a principal's priorities in managing change. Explore strategies for school transformation, shifting to online assessments, early learning and more. Plus, discover how to boost creativity at your school with the Champion Creatively Alive Children arts-themed supplement from NAESP and Crayola.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
 


Before the Bell is a benefit of your membership in the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). For information about other member benefits, visit www.naesp.org or contact us at naesp@naesp.org.

Before the Bell is a digest of the most important news selected for NAESP from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The presence of such advertising does not endorse, or imply endorsement of, any products or services by NAESP. Neither NAESP nor Multiview is liable for the use of or reliance on any information contained in this briefing.

Feedback about an article? Contact NAESP Liaison Meredith Barnett at MBarnett@naesp.org.
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601   Download media kit
This edition of Before the Bell was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here.

NAESP | 1615 Duke Street | Alexandria, VA 22314 | www.naesp.org | 800-386-2377
Recent issues
Sept. 26, 2014
Sept. 23, 2014
Sept. 19, 2014
Sept. 16, 2014



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063