This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.


Advertisement


Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit October 21, 2014

Curriculum    School Leadership   Federal Advocacy & Policy   In the States   Association News   Buy Books   Contact NAESP


Let Kids Fly with ZipKrooz™


ZipKrooz™ brings zip line-like adventure to the playground in an exciting, inclusive and safe way!


 

Advertisement



Report: Students lack wireless access to digital learning resources at school
THE Journal
Students have better wireless access to the Internet at home than at school, according to a report conducted by Harris Poll on behalf of Pearson. The Pearson Student Mobile Device Survey 2014 collected responses from 2,252 K-12 students between Feb. 13 and March 12, 2014. It found that while 93 percent of students have wireless access to the Internet at home, only 62 percent have Wi-Fi at school, limiting their access to digital learning resources for personalized instruction.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




Stop-arm programs help raise awareness as part of School Bus Safety Week
School Transportation News
More and more school districts nationwide are adopting stop-arm enforcement programs that involve mounting video cameras on buses' stop signs to detect and deter motorists from illegally passing a stopped school bus. The Redflex Student Guardian is helping to protect children at school bus stops in Connecticut, Georgia, Illinois, Iowa, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Ohio, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Texas, Virginia and Washington.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Inclusion Corner: Begin with co-planning
By Savanna Flakes
Co-teaching implemented with fidelity has a profound impact on a range of learners with and without disabilities from a variety of cultures. Co-teaching is often characterized as a "marriage" between a general education and a specialist. Formally defined, co-teaching is two or more educators sharing responsibility for teaching some or all of the students assigned to a classroom. According to Marilyn Friend and Lynne Cook, it involves the distribution of responsibility among people for planning, instruction and evaluation for a classroom of students.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT


Learning from live theater
Education Next
As schools narrow their focus on improving performance on math and reading standardized tests, they have greater difficulty justifying taking students out of the classroom for experiences that are not related to improving those test scores. Schools are either attending fewer field trips or shifting toward field trips to places they know students already enjoy. When testing is over, schools are often inclined to take students on "reward" field trips to places like amusement parks, bowling alleys, and movie theaters.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Increasing rigor in the classroom
By: Brian Stack
Every teacher wants to be able to say that he or she is increasing rigor in the classroom. How does a teacher go about doing that? It isn't enough for a teacher to make tests longer or add a comprehensive project to the curriculum. To increase rigor in the classroom, teachers need to get to the heart of what rigor is and understand the levels of rigor that exist so that they can evaluate their own teaching practices and build a plan to increase rigor from there.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement
PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  A Perfect Match to the SBAC Test Specs

Common Core Standards Plus covers ALL Strands and
Domains in ONE easy-to-use resource. With content at
every DOK level
in a progression of rigor and relevance,
it’s everything your teachers and students need to prepare
for the SBAC.

Learn More – View the SBAC Correlation Chart
 


Despite cuts, here's why arts education matters to kids of every age
TakePart (commentary)
Brian Richardson, a music teacher in Philadelphia public schools, writes: "'Why are you always smiling?' There are a lot of things my students tend to notice about me — I always wear something purple, I sing all the time, I call them 'cats and kittens' or 'ladybugs and gentle, gentle men.' But the thing everyone notices about me is my eternally sunny disposition. The kids aren't the only ones who are curious."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Report: High Internet bills impede school access
Roll Call
The majority of school districts surveyed cited the monthly Internet costs as an obstacle to boosting connectivity in schools, according to a new report that calls for more funding for the federal program that subsidizes Internet service for public schools and libraries. According to the report, 58 percent of school districts said high Internet bills posed the biggest barrier to boosting Internet connectivity. Another 38 percent said capital, non-recurring costs were their biggest challenge. Other barriers included factors like geography and poor classroom wireless access.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keywords INTERNET.


Advertisement


Standardized tests must measure up
The Washington Post (commentary)
Arne Duncan, the secretary of education, writes: "As a parent, I want to know how my children are progressing in school each year. The more I know, the more I can help them build upon their strengths and interests and work on their weaknesses. The more I know, the better I can reinforce at home each night the hard work of their teachers during the school day. The standardized tests my kids take are one gauge on the dashboard, but parents and educators know that tests are not the only indicator."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  50% Profit Reusable Bag Fundraisers

Mixed Bag Designs green fundraising programs are easy and profitable. The colorful reusable bags and stylish accessories are easy-to-sell, quality products. Mixed Bag Designs offers profit programs up to 50% plus free shipping on your main order, with orders sorted by seller. Go green with a Mixed Bag Designs fundraiser.
 


Why the label 'exceeds standard' doesn't work
Education Week (commentary)
Educators implementing standards-based approaches to grading and reporting often struggle with how to label different levels of students' performance. Four levels of performance is the most common number identified. Most educators in the U.S. and Canada consider three levels to be insufficient in discriminating important differences in students' performance. When the number of levels climbs to five or six, however, the consistency of teachers' rating diminishes rapidly.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Inside the new school lunch
The Atlantic
On a typical Thursday, Cole Coffey, a sixth-grader at Schoo Middle School in Lincoln, Nebraska, would face a school lunch menu that reads a little like a Weight-Watchers recipe guide: "Whole chicken nuggets with whole wheat garlic bread, whole grain lasagna with whole wheat garlic bread, sweet and sour meatballs on whole grain brown rice." Purists who claim it's a cultural crime to use a fibrous, nutritious substitute for the traditional Italian bruschetta may be even more dismayed by the day's vegetarian offering: "Veggie Wrap on Whole Grain Tortilla." And, in this, one of the top meat-producing states in the country, there's also a fully stocked raw vegetable bar and a daily spinach salad.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




How can students have more say in school decisions?
MindShift
Two years ago, Zak Malamed and a few friends held their first Twitter chat for students who were feeling frustrated about how little say they had in the school reform debates going on all around them. At the time, Malamed and two other friends were still in high school, and one friend was in college. But when they formed Student Voice, the group that rose out of that first chat, they agreed that "Revolutionizing education through the voices and actions of students," in whatever form that would take, would be their mission.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  FEATURED COMPANIES
Advertisement
The Fundamental 5 - A Kindle Best Seller

Discover the revolutionary system of daily teacher actions that are transforming 1000's
of classrooms across
the nation. Order now on Amazon.com
Advertisement
Advance your career in Administration!

California University of Pennsylvania is proud to offer 100% online master’s level programs in Education Administration and Leadership, including Principal and Superintendent preparation programs.


The importance of digital citizenship in schools
District Administration Magazine
Technology has provided administrators with some great opportunities for communication and data analysis, but for our students it means so much more. To help our students, we need to show that with all these opportunities come responsibilities. All administrators have read, or lived through, instances of cyberbullying, sexting and even suicide that have come from the misuse of technology. All users of technology need to come to grips with how to use the tools of today and how to become digital citizens.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Building positive school culture: 20 ideas from principals (Connected Principals)
The bare walls theory: Do too many classroom decorations harm learning? (NBC News)
Kids get better grades when they share similarities with teachers (The Atlantic)
Ensuring early reading literacy (District Administration Magazine)
Which are the most educated cities in the US — and why? (By: Archita Datta Majumdar)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




Many schools are still getting less funding than they were before the Great Recession
The Huffington Post
A new report from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities contains depressing news for schools. According to the report, at least 30 states are providing districts with less funding than they were prior to the Great Recession. States started slashing their education budgets as a result of the 2007-2009 recession. However, the impact of the cuts has apparently continued to linger, even as the country's economic outlook has improved, the report concludes. While state funding for students improved slightly in the 2014-2015 school year, that additional funding has not completely restored budgets to their previous levels.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Why teaching kindness in schools is essential to reduce bullying
Edutopia
Phrases like "random acts of kindness" and "pay it forward" have become popular terms in modern society. Perhaps this could be best explained by those who have identified a deficiency in their lives that can only be fulfilled by altruism. It seems that we just can't get enough of those addictive, feel-good emotions — and with good reason. Scientific studies prove that kindness has many physical, emotional, and mental health benefits. And children need a healthy dose of the warm-and-fuzzies to thrive as healthy, happy, well-rounded individuals.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




As overtesting outcry grows, education leaders pull back on standardized tests
The Christian Science Monitor
As the outcry against the overtesting of American children has grown, state and local education leaders — in a move endorsed by President Barack Obama — have announced a new focus on dialing back the volume of standardized testing and dialing up the quality.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Study: State and district tests frequent, but take little instructional time
Education Week
The Washington-based Center for American Progress released a report looking at how much time students spend taking state- and district-required tests.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Maximizing PLC time to flip your class
District Administration Magazine
Recently, we have been talking with a number of people about how to best implement flipped learning, and one hurdle mentioned over and over by teachers is that they do not have enough time.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
5 apps for today's administrators
eSchool News
Leading a school or a school district is, understandably, an important and critical job. Today's school administrators must keep up to date with learning trends, instructional strategies, technology initiatives, and everything in between.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more




Doctors: School closings in Texas, Ohio, unnecessary
USA Today
Infectious disease experts say school officials in Ohio and Texas overreacted when they canceled classes in fear of Ebola. Several schools in both states shut their doors over concerns that some staff members and students might have come in contact with a person infected with the virus. An email sent to parents in the Solon City School District in Northeast Ohio said they closed Solon Middle and Parkside Elementary schools Thursday after they learned that a middle school staff member may have traveled aboard the same airplane, though not on the same flight, as Dallas nurse Amber Joy Vinson.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Study: State and district tests frequent, but take little instructional time
Education Week
The Washington-based Center for American Progress released a report looking at how much time students spend taking state- and district-required tests. The report coincided with a joint announcement from the Council of Chief State School Officers and the Council of the Great City Schools that the groups would work together to reduce unnecessary testing while staying the course on annual standardized assessments.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Mississippi kindergarteners start the year behind, new test finds
The Hechinger Report
Two-thirds of Mississippi's youngest learners are starting the year unprepared, according to results from a new test examining the reading skills of kindergarten students. Kindergartners took the STAR Early Literacy exam during the first month of the current school year to gauge their reading abilities. Over 40,000 students from 144 school districts took the computer-based exam that measures what the students know as they enter kindergarten. It was the first time the state gave the test.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Download NAESP's new pre-K-3 competencies
NAESP
Last Thursday, NAESP released an updated early learning competency guide for principals. Developed by a panel of leading practitioners, Leading Pre-K-3 Learning Communities: Competencies for Effective Principal Practice defines new competencies and outlines a practical approach to high-quality early childhood education. The digital edition of the publication is free for download for a limited time.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Learn school branding basics in Oct. 28 tweetchat
NAESP
NAESP has teamed up with the Texas Elementary Principals and Supervisors Association for a National Principals Month tweetchat on a very hot topic: school branding. Join the "Social Media and School Branding" chat on Tuesday, Oct. 28 at 8 p.m. Eastern for a discussion on the ins and outs of school branding — from logos to mottos to messaging.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
 


Before the Bell is a benefit of your membership in the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). For information about other member benefits, visit www.naesp.org or contact us at naesp@naesp.org.

Before the Bell is a digest of the most important news selected for NAESP from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The presence of such advertising does not endorse, or imply endorsement of, any products or services by NAESP. Neither NAESP nor Multiview is liable for the use of or reliance on any information contained in this briefing.

Feedback about an article? Contact NAESP Liaison Meredith Barnett at MBarnett@naesp.org.
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601   Download media kit
This edition of Before the Bell was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here.

NAESP | 1615 Duke Street | Alexandria, VA 22314 | www.naesp.org | 800-386-2377
Recent issues
Oct. 14, 2014
Oct. 10, 2014
Oct. 7, 2014
Oct. 3, 2014



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063