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Report: 10 percent of students miss too much school
District Administration Magazine
An estimated one in 10 students in the United States are chronically absent from school, increasing the chances they will fall behind or drop out. Students who miss 18 or more days of school are considered "chronically absent," regardless of whether the absences are excused, unexcused, or for disciplinary reasons, says a new policy brief from Attendance Works, a national and state initiative founded in 2010 that is aimed at addressing chronic absence to improve student success.
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School nurses' duties expand with changing times
USA Today
The Boy Scout motto of "be prepared" equally applies to today's school nurses, who not only deal with the typical bruises and tummy aches that have always been part of school life, but must now contend with a student population that is increasingly more medically fragile. As school systems face budget cuts, nurses must also adapt to a "migrant" lifestyle as they are assigned to several schools during a workweek.
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Study: 8th-graders in more than half of US states better than average in math and science
The Washington Post
Eighth-graders in more than half the U.S. states did better than average on an international test in math and science, but the top students lagged behind South Korea, Singapore and Taiwan, according to a study released by the federal government. In math, public school students in 36 states scored higher than average. The lowest scoring state was Alabama and the highest was Massachusetts. U.S. students did better on the science test, with students in 47 states scoring higher than average. The District was the lowest scoring U.S. jurisdiction; Massachusetts was again the highest scorer.
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The state of the Common Core
Edutopia
Millions of teachers and thousands of districts in 45 states are currently undergoing a sea change in the way that they teach and assess students. The new Common Core Standards for learning have been phased into states and districts since 2010, and the digitized Common Core Assessments are scheduled to deploy in states that have adopted them as early as the 2014-2015 school year.
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Common Core study: Teachers aiming too low with reading assignments
Education Week
A new survey shows that most teachers are still gearing class reading assignments to students' skill level, rather than — as the Common Core Standards envision — to their grade level. "Common Core in the Schools: A First Look at Reading Assignments," released by the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, explores the practices of teachers as they begin teaching the common standards in public schools in 46 states and the District of Columbia. It's slated for discussion at an event in Washington which will be webcast live Wednesday (at 1 p.m. Eastern) and available in archived form.
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6 tips to get your kids excited about coding
THE Journal
Teaching kids how to code is top of mind for many people these days. With all the discussions about bolstering STEM education in the United States (not to mention STEM+ and STEAM) and with all the changes to the economy that have pushed technology companies to the forefront, it's clear that large-scale change is in our future, and coding could someday very well become as integral a part of early education as reading, writing, and math. Fortunately, you don't have to wait for "someday" to get your school coding. Here are six tips to help you spark and sustain a child's interest in programming inside and outside the classroom.
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Implementing Common Core for students with disabilities
eSchool News
A new website for students — and in particular, those with disabilities — is offering free "anytime, anyplace" resources, materials, and information to help schools ensure that their students meet the Common Core State Standards. Created by the Center for Technology Implementation, the website for students with disabilities, PowerUp What Works, links evidence-based practices, Universal Design for Learning and technology to guide teachers, school leaders, professional development facilitators and teacher educators in their professional learning.
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Who is an 'English language learner?'
Stateline
If a U.S. student learning English were to drive across the country, he would find that in some states he would be classified an "English language learner," eligible to receive extra support. In other states, the same student would not qualify for the special designation — or the additional help. In California, for example, English-language learners spend part of the day focused on learning English. The rest of the day, teachers help them learn the same material as native English speakers, with some modifications. For example, they might be divided into smaller groups with other limited English speakers, or receive a preview or review of the lesson in their native tongue.
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New strategy for more efficient learning
Psychology Today
In 1913, Ebbinghaus demonstrated that spacing learning out over time creates much more efficient learning than cramming a learning task into a single intense session. Now, a new discovery has been made for a specific spaced-learning strategy that so far is the best of all. In reviewing this new design, Kelley and Whatson point out experiments showing that this kind of spaced learning is optimal for information encoding and for activation of the genes needed to form long-term memory.
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Corporal punishment persists in US schools
Education Week
Three years ago, school officials in Marion County, Fla., banned corporal punishment, but this school year, students returned to class to find the discipline practice was once again firmly in place. Marion County's back and forth on school spanking illustrates the persistence of corporal punishment in the nation's schools as a discipline technique for use on wayward students. Even as an increasing number of districts and states abolish the practice, corporal punishment remains a legal form of discipline in 19 states, most of them in the South, according to the Center for Effective Discipline, a nonprofit based in Columbus, Ohio, that provides educational information on corporal punishment and alternatives to its use. That's a decrease from 2004, when 22 states permitted the practice.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword CORPORAL PUNISHMENT.


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    States' teacher evaluation methods vary widely (eSchool News)
Schools take the boring out of long bus rides (District Administration Magazine)
How a radical new teaching method could unleash a generation of geniuses (Wired)
Model school aims to retrain teachers in ABCs of reading instruction (PBS)
Non-regular bedtimes tied to kids' behavior problems (Reuters)

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3 state approaches to student data privacy
eSchool News
As school reform efforts receive nationwide attention, collecting and using student data plays an important role in improving teaching and learning in today's classrooms. But accompanying student data are conversations about data privacy. Concerns about how education leaders use and protect student data abound, and some states and state education leaders are making a concerted effort to ensure that adequate protections are in place for student data, while at the same time making sure that educators are able to use data to inform and improve instruction.
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Learning to lead through learning to follow
By Andy Curtis
Leadership in English language teaching appears to have been relatively overlooked, apart from a few helpful and useful books. But when we look at the tens of thousands of books and papers on leadership in other areas, such as business and heath care, we can see that the vast majority of them are about experiences of leading, not experiences of following. In the same way that the voices of the learners are often conspicuous by their absence in many studies that claim to be about teaching and learning, the voices of the "followers" are similarly absent in the leadership literature.
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Spanking your kids could affect their vocabulary down the road
Los Angeles Times
To spank or not to spank: For most American parents, it isn't a question. The majority of U.S. children have been spanked at some time in their life, despite a robust body of evidence that suggests spanking a child leads to problems in the future. The latest evidence of the negative effects of spanking comes from researchers at Columbia University. After analyzing data from more than 1,500 families, they found that children who are spanked in early childhood are not only more likely to be aggressive as older children, they are also more likely to do worse on vocabulary tests than their peers who had not been spanked.
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Corporal punishment persists in US schools
Education Week
Three years ago, school officials in Marion County, Fla., banned corporal punishment, but this school year, students returned to class to find the discipline practice was once again firmly in place. Marion County's back and forth on school spanking illustrates the persistence of corporal punishment in the nation's schools as a discipline technique for use on wayward students.

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School districts struggle to get principals to stay put
NPR
At Milwaukee Parkside School for the Arts on the south side of Milwaukee, kids are back in class and getting their bearings in the sprawling building. So is Lila Hillman, the school's brand-new principal.

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Teamwork in schools: What administrators should know
eSchool News
Administrators are tasked with an ever-growing list of responsibilities in their schools and districts. Central to ensuring smooth operations? Teamwork. When school administrators, teachers, and staff members work together collaboratively, school operations and initiative are more efficient.

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School puts single-sex classrooms to the test
WLOX-TV
A Gulfport, Miss., school is experimenting with a different program this year: Single-sex classrooms. Gaston Point Elementary is the only school in the Gulfport School District right now to separate the boys and girls. The change only affects classes for first and fifth graders. The principal decided to put the boys and girls in separate classrooms to test the program. She started with the first grade, because there are enough teachers to handle the split-up classes, and the fifth grade, because the class size is small. The change came after she studied last year's data and became concerned about the high percentage of boys who were struggling academically.
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We have to do what? The new face of teacher evaluations
eSchool News (commentary)
Jenny Froehle, a contributor for eSchool News, writes: "As someone you'd politely call a 'veteran educator,' I've been fortunate to work in schools for more than a quarter century, and in that time, like all of us in school leadership, I've seen many ideas come and go, often without lasting impact — or even much temporary effect — on our daily work. Even veteran educators, however, will admit that new teacher evaluation laws are what they call 'a game changer' — one of those professional events that could not help but get our attention."
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What's driving K-12 schools to the cloud?
EdTech Magazine
One week after installing a new wireless network at Fort Worth, Texas, Academy, a private K–8 school of 200 students, Associate Head of School for Operations Darryl Loy was notified of a problem with the network. The fact that he was attending an out-of-state conference that day could have been its own problem. But in practice, it wasn't a problem at all. "I opened my tablet, navigated to the management website and was able to fix the issue remotely, in real time," Loy recalls. Welcome to the new world of wireless networking in the cloud.
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How have Washington's budget battles affected education technology grants?
THE Journal
Lately, all eyes have been on Washington D.C., watching the government in turmoil. During the recent shutdown, nearly 90 percent of the United States Department of Education — about 4,000 people — was furloughed. Rumors abounded about the impact on schools around the country. You must be wondering whether the shutdown and ensuing budget battles will lead to any changes in federal funding for your institutions. Will you still get any money? Will disbursements be delayed? Even though federal monies account for only about 10 percent of the funding for your programs, they are very important for your technology purchases.
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After fiscal drama, Impact Aid districts will see some early money
Education Week
When Congress pulls budget shenanigans, Impact Aid suffers more than just about any other federal K-12 education program. But, in the midst of all the fiscal drama this year, Impact Aid districts are finally getting some good news: A good chunk of the money they're owed this year will arrive early.
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Nevada school shooting: Teacher killed, two students wounded
CNN
A student opening fire with a handgun he took from his parents. Screaming students running for cover. A teacher, trying to help, shot dead. Two students wounded. The terror lasted just a few brutal minutes. As authorities investigated, details were still trickling out hours after a deadly shooting at a Nevada middle school. One official described the scene at Sparks Middle School with one word: chaos.
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California schools' fitness tests: About one-third of students met the goals
San Jose Mercury News
Although California students made slight gains in physical fitness this year, a report released Wednesday adds more fuel to arguments that children need to ditch the TV and video games in favor of more athletic pursuits. The report shows that fewer than one-third of students in grades 5 and 7 met physical fitness goals last year. Each year, the state tests students in six areas: aerobic capacity, abdominal strength, upper body strength, trunk strength, flexibility and body fat composition. The goal is for students to meet fitness standards in all six areas to prevent against diseases that can result from inactivity.
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Submit a proposal for the 2014 NAESP conference
NAESP
Share your favorite best practices with elementary and middle-level principals from across the country at the 2014 NAESP Conference. Submit a proposal to present a concurrent session at the conference, which will be held July 10-12, 2014, in Nashville. Proposals will be accepted until Oct. 31.
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Last week to post a story for National Principals Month
NAESP
This month, NAESP invites educators, students, and parents to celebrate the contributions of principals during National Principals Month. Submit stories, photos, videos or poems about principals to our Hats Off to Principals Facebook contest. Principals, you're welcome to honor a colleague or an assistant principal, too! Visit our Facebook page to upload your tribute, and you could win excellent prizes.
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Before the Bell is a benefit of your membership in the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). For information about other member benefits, visit www.naesp.org or contact us at naesp@naesp.org.

Before the Bell is a digest of the most important news selected for NAESP from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The presence of such advertising does not endorse, or imply endorsement of, any products or services by NAESP. Neither NAESP nor Multiview is liable for the use of or reliance on any information contained in this briefing.

Feedback about an article? Contact NAESP Liaison Meredith Barnett at MBarnett@naesp.org.
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601   Download media kit
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