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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit November 14, 2014

Curriculum    School Leadership   Federal Advocacy & Policy   In the States   Association News   Buy Books   Contact NAESP


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Job satisfaction jumps as more classroom educators coach — and lead — their colleagues
District Administration Magazine
Jessica Cuthbertson's dental hygienist cleans the teeth of many unhappy teachers — exhausted, burned-out folks who feel pulled in too many directions and have too many papers to grade. Cuthbertson isn't one of them. "You're the happiest teacher I see in this chair," the hygienist told Cuthbertson during a recent appointment. "The others don’t speak about the profession with the joy that you do." One reason for Cuthbertson's joy: Although she spends part of each day teaching eighth-grade English in the Aurora Public Schools, near Denver, her job has another dimension.
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Are future teachers getting too many easy A's?
PBS Newshour
The Internet is teeming with advice for first-year teachers on how to navigate the challenges they'll face in the classroom. Establish boundaries. Get to know your students outside the classroom. Challenge the most advanced students without leaving those who struggle behind. But how to do all of that and more shouldn't be a mystery for new teachers to solve on their own, according to Kate Walsh, director of the National Council for Teacher Quality. A report out today from the group called "Easy A's" argues new teachers find themselves floundering because many teacher prep programs aren't challenging enough.
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Are state arts education policies working?
Education Week
Just because a state has a law requiring arts instruction doesn't mean students are actually getting it, according to education experts at an Education Writers Association webinar. Mary Plummer, an arts education reporter for Southern California Public Radio, who moderated the event, pointed to an analysis she'd done of the types of arts instruction offered at elementary schools in the Los Angeles Unified School District. California has a law mandating that schools teach dance, visual arts, music, and theater to all 1st through 6th grade students.
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Drilling down: Audio-lingual method can help
By: Eva Sullivan
This fall, my high school ESOL classes have been particularly challenging. My newcomer students are struggling to adapt to their new cultural and language environment, and my advanced students are struggling to master new curriculum materials that align with Common Core. That leaves me in the middle, stressed about how to deliver the best instruction, given the enormous time constraints imposed by my school schedule. The bell rings every 50 minutes, and I've got a new class coming in. How can I cover the curriculum and allow sufficient time to practice a skill?
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Study: Playing high-action video games may speed up learning
Education Week
Contrary to the popular stereotype of a distracted teenager lost in Halo or Call of Duty video games, new evidence suggests playing such high-action video games may help students learn and react faster — but not more impulsively. The new findings run counter to recent studies that have linked extensive video game playing to attention-deficit and impulsiveness disorders, stoking concerns that playing highly stimulating video games reduces students' ability to pay attention in less-stimulating academic settings.
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How storytelling inspires children to learn English
Edutopia (commentary)
Matthew James Friday, a contributor for Edutopia, writes: "Storytelling has tremendous benefits for classroom learning, as I discussed in my post Why Storytelling in the Classroom Matters. This time, I want to further explore those benefits, in particular how storytelling inspires children to learn English. The motivation for this comes from my recent experience of teaching in an international school in China that has a 97 percent cohort of students learning English as an additional language."
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    The high cost of principal turnover (Marketplace)
The 3 most common practices in school turnaround efforts (THE Journal)
Teachers favor Common Core, not the testing (Gallup)
Just 4 minutes of fun exercise improves learning and behavior in the classroom (Medical News Today)
Snow days turn digital at more schools (District Administration Magazine)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.






Packed lunches 'have poorer nutritional quality' than school lunches
Medical News Today
Many parents prefer to send their children off to school with a packed lunch, believing that the food they have given them is far healthier than school lunches. But a new study, published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, claims this may not be the case.
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Can a teacher be too dedicated?
The Atlantic
James Cavanagh is 22-years-old, fresh out of the University of Delaware. With his degree in elementary education, he could have gotten a job anywhere — and he chose to teach at one of the most demanding public schools in America. His college buddies were hired at schools with mid-afternoon dismissals and two and a half months of summer vacation. For not much more pay, Cavanagh worked nearly all of August and this fall is putting in 12-hour days, plus attending graduate school.
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6 tools for parent-teacher collaboration
eSchool News
Educators know that students' home lives play an integral role in their academic success. Communication between teachers and parents makes it easier for educators to understand the outside challenges students may deal with, and it helps parents understand how they can better support their children in school. In August, we brought you five tools that parents and teachers could use to start the school year off connected.
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School environment affects teacher expectations of their students
University de Montreal via Science Daily
The school environment in which teachers work is related to their expectations of students, according to a new study. "It is known that low teacher expectations are negatively associated with student achievement and school effectiveness. While we know that expectations are primarily determined by the specific characteristics of teachers, we have shown that the school environment also plays a determining role," says the lead author of the study.
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US to focus on equity in assigning of teachers
The New York Times
The Obama administration is directing states to show how they will ensure that all students have equal access to high-quality teachers, with a sharp focus on schools with a high proportion of the poor and racial minorities. In a letter to state superintendents, Deborah S. Delisle, an assistant secretary at the Department of Education, said states must develop plans by next June that make sure that public schools comply with existing federal law requiring that "poor and minority children are not taught at higher rates than other children by inexperienced, unqualified or out-of-field teachers."
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7 reasons digital equity is a social justice issue
eSchool News
Digital access and digital equity continue to present a challenge to educators. Meeting that challenge is more important than ever, because, as many stakeholders say, digital equity is about more than access to devices and strong Internet connections — it's about social justice and fair opportunity. Mobile learning equity has been a big focus for educators for many years, but discussions usually center on access to devices and internet.
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Communities struggle to reach homeless students living in the shadows
NPR
It's late afternoon and the day has just ended at a Los Angeles school. Students are making their way toward the parking lot, where a dusty 2001 Ford Taurus stands out among the shiny SUVs filled with waiting parents. Kids walk by and stare. In the backseat of the Taurus, James, a tall 14-year-old boy in a checkered shirt, smiles. He is familiar with the stares. He never told anyone that he was once homeless, but they knew. It's hard to hide homelessness from other kids, he says. They want to know why you're wearing the same shirt and why you look tired.
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Democrats call on Education Department to ensure equity in NCLB waiver guidance
Education Week
Ahead of the U.S. Department of Education's No Child Left Behind waiver guidance Rep. George Miller, D-Calif., and Democrats who represent majority-minority districts are urging Education Secretary Arne Duncan to ensure the academic achievement of all students. In a letter sent to Duncan, Miller and members of the Congressional Black Caucus, the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, and the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus, asked the department to guarantee that states seeking a renewal of their waivers remain accountable for the achievement of all students, including minority students, students with disabilities, low-income students and English language learners.
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Study outlines options for cost savings in Oklahoma's school districts
The Moore American
Oklahoma's school districts can redirect more funding to teachers and classrooms by streamlining and consolidating administrative costs, offering parents more choices for their children and eliminating waste, said Sen. Kyle Loveless. The Oklahoma State Senate Education Subcommittee on Appropriations held an interim study spurred by legislation authored by Loveless last session. The bill would have consolidated administrative spending for more than 200 Oklahoma school districts with 250 or fewer students, which Loveless said could have resulted in more than $35 million in savings to be redirected to classrooms.
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Goodbye to snow days as students study from home
The Associated Press via The Huffington Post
She's no Grinch about it, but Lynn Grewing is the principal who stole snow days. The early arrival of wintry weather in the Midwest this week gave Grewing an opening to test out a virtual class day at St. Cloud Cathedral high school in central Minnesota, having students whip out laptops or iPads and work from home. After a successful test run, Grewing declared that students' cherished snow days are a thing of the past — at least at Cathedral.
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Write for Principal magazine
NAESP
No one knows a principal's job better than you do. You know the challenges, the rewards, the humor, and the successes. How about sharing some of those experiences with your colleagues? Writing for our magazine is a great way to help other principals while giving you fresh insights into your own professional development. The next topic is student and mental health. View the 2014-2015 Editorial Calendar and submission guidelines for more information.
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Register for upcoming mentor training in Austin
NAESP
Being a principal is a tough job, especially with today's increasing demands on school leaders. Mentoring can provide crucial support to new principals. The NAESP National Mentor Program is designed to engage retired and experienced principals to give back to their profession by supporting new, newly assigned or even experienced principals through mentoring. Ready to dive in? The next mentor training session is Jan. 22-24 in Austin, Texas.
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