eNews on Prevention, Wellness & Lifestyle
May. 8, 2013

Exercise may lower older women's risk for kidney stones
HealthDay News
A new study suggests that getting more exercise may reduce older women's risk for kidney stones. Researchers analyzed data from more than 85,000 postmenopausal women in the United States and found that higher levels of physical activity seemed to lower the risk of kidney stones by as much as 31 percent.More

Most people aren't meeting exercise guidelines
USA Today
Most adults in the U.S. aren't meeting the federal physical activity recommendations for both aerobic exercise and muscle-strengthening activity, according to government statistics. About 79 percent of adults don't meet the physical activity guidelines that advise getting at least 2 ½ hours a week of moderate-intensity aerobic activity such as brisk walking, or one hour and 15 minutes a week of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity, such as jogging. More

FDA proposes tougher regulations on tanning beds
USA Today
Tanning beds could soon come with a warning label, alerting users to the risk of skin cancer and noting that the devices shouldn't be used by people under 18.More

Puff before exercise helps breathing
MedPage Today
Patients with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction are best managed with an inhaled short-acting beta agonist 15 minutes before exercise, according to new guidelines from the American Thoracic Society.More

No, really — Don't shop when you're hungry
Reuters
A new study offers evidence to support what many people have learned for themselves: never go grocery shopping when you're hungry. Researchers found that people who hadn't eaten all afternoon chose more high-calorie foods in a simulated supermarket than those who were given a snack just before online food shopping.More

Study: Popular eye supplements need a tweak
USA Today
Millions of older Americans who take special vitamin and mineral supplements to slow progression of a blinding condition called age-related macular degeneration should take note of a new study: It shows that adding omega-3 fatty acids to the mix probably won't help, but that replacing beta-carotene with two other nutrients might be a good idea.More

FDA proposes tougher regulations on tanning beds
USA Today
Tanning beds could soon come with a warning label, alerting users to the risk of skin cancer and noting that the devices shouldn't be used by people under 18.More

Wasted real-world clinical data
By Mike Wokasch
We spend tens of billions of dollars every year on healthcare research, yet we don't have answers to some very basic questions about prevention and treatment of most diseases.More

Government-backed group calls for universal HIV testing of adults
TIME
For the first time, a federally convened panel of experts is recommending HIV testing for all adults based on evidence that early detection of the virus could lead to more effective treatment of infection.More

Stress study offers clues for new antidepressant drugs
Reuters
Scientists have worked out the way in which stress hormones reduce the number of new brain cells — a process linked to depression — and say their work should help researchers develop more effective antidepressants.More

Urology group stops recommending routine PSA test
USA Today
In a major break from the past, a leading medical group is advising men to think carefully before getting screened for prostate cancer. The American Urological Association, which has staunchly defended the PSA screening test in recent years, says healthy men under 55 don't need routine annual screening.More

Texting improves health outcomes for young asthmatics
FierceMobileHealthcare
Simple, daily SMS text messages asking pediatric asthma patients about their symptoms and providing knowledge about their condition can lead to improved health outcomes, according to a study out of the Georgia Institute of Technology.More

Strep throat? Don't toss the toothbrush
TIME
Parents often toss their child’s toothbrush after a bout of strep throat, but new research indicates that's probably a waste of good bristles. Researchers compared bacteria growth on toothbrushes to brushes used by 13 patients who had sore throats, but not strep, and toothbrushes used by 27 healthy participants. The strep bacteria only grew on one of the toothbrushes, and it was from a participant who did not have strep throat. More