eNews on Prevention, Wellness & Lifestyle
Sep. 18, 2013

Raise a glass of beer — to your health
By Denise A. Valenti
Despite the name, Oktoberfest traditional fall beer celebrations begin in September and extend into October. The biggest Oktoberfest beer bash is held in Munich and is considered to be the world's largest fair. This year — the 180th year the Oktoberfest has been held — will host more than 6 million people from around the world. Today’s Oktoberfest celebrants can not only toast to good food and fun, but also good health.More

7 workout mistakes you may be making and how to fix them
The Huffington Post
The first step in breaking a bad habit — or not developing one in the first place — is to identify the problem. Here are seven common workout mistakes and suggestions on how to fix them.More

Hot exercise classes catching on like fire
Los Angeles Times
Mimi Benz discovered her fervor for hot exercise by accident. She had taken heated yoga classes but had never thought to combine high temperatures with her true passion, indoor cycling, until the air conditioning broke during a cycling class at her gym. From that first hot ride, she was hooked.More

Which is worse: Eating right before bed or going to sleep hungry?
Self via Yahoo Health
Don't go to bed with a growling stomach, says registered dietitian Melinda Johnson, a spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Hunger signals the brain to stay alert so you can scavenge for sustenance. And a hungry, restless night makes for next-day grogginess, which could have you desperately reaching for more calories for energy. As for eating a full meal right before bed, you might have heard that it makes you more likely to store the calories as fat because you're not awake and actively burning them. Not true.More

Obese stomachs tell us diets are doomed to fail
ScienceDaily
The way the stomach detects and tells our brains how full we are becomes damaged in obese people but does not return to normal once they lose weight, according to new research from the University of Adelaide. Researchers believe this could be a key reason why most people who lose weight on a diet eventually put that weight back on.More

6 health lessons from the paleo diet
The Huffington Post
Not since paleolithic times has it been so fashionable to eat like a hunter-gatherer. While everyone from professional athletes to mommy bloggers seems to be touting the whole food, grain-free, meat-heavy paleo diet, it's not without its critics. The paleo diet — which also goes by the names "caveman" or "stone age" diet — advocates eating pre-agrarian foods. If our hunter-gatherer ancestors didn't eat it, Paleo eaters don't want to eat it either. More

Raise a glass of beer — to your health
By Denise A. Valenti
Despite the name, Oktoberfest traditional fall beer celebrations begin in September and extend into October. The biggest Oktoberfest beer bash is held in Munich and is considered to be the world's largest fair. This year — the 180th year the Oktoberfest has been held — will host more than 6 million people from around the world. More

Can you be fit and fat?
Everyday Health
Some people who look obese but appear to be "fit and fat" may be that way due to a lack of inflammation, according to a new study out of University College Cork in Ireland. Obesity typically worsens inflammation in the body, and is thought to lead to other conditions such as diabetes and heart disease. More

Myths surround breakfast and weight
The New York Times
Americans have long been told that routinely eating breakfast is a simple habit that helps prevent weight gain. Skipping breakfast, the thinking goes, increases hunger throughout the day, making people overeat and seek out snacks to compensate for missing that first meal of the day. More

Medicine or treats? Gummy vitamins and chocolate calcium chews blur line
Forbes
Are manufacturers blurring the lines between medicinal products and candy by selling products like gummy vitamins for children and chocolate calcium chews for adults? Or is this approach the best way to encourage people to take the supplements? "Most dieticians would agree that you would always rather see vitamins and minerals come from a well-balanced diet and a healthy meal plan, rather than actual supplements," says Lori Zanini, a registered dietician in Los Angeles. More

What you need to know about multivitamins
Real Simple via Fox News
Supplements can add nutrients to your diet. Here, experts sort through a variety of multivitamins. What they are: One-pill wonders that offer 100 percent of the recommended daily allowance, as suggested by the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, for many important vitamins. More

New signs of improvement in the youth obesity epidemic?
USA Today
There's more evidence to suggest the USA's epidemic of childhood obesity is stabilizing, and the reasons may be that kids are eating better and watching less TV. Between 2001 and 2009, U.S. adolescents increased physical activity, ate more fruits and vegetables, ate breakfast more, watched less TV and ate fewer sweets, a new study says. More

Teens interested in healthy minds — and ripped bodies
ScienceDaily
Dreams of washboard abs and toned arms may seem to be the main motivation for the average teen to lace up their running shoes. But over 1,000 Montreal high school students disagree. Teens, it seems, are smarter than their parents when it comes to approaching exercise as something that affects one's whole body.More

Americans are living better, longer
The Boston Globe
Recent predictions that the obesity epidemic will lead to shorter lifespans for today's young adults are challenged by a new study conducted by Massachusetts researchers, which suggests a more optimistic outlook: The average 25-year-old today can expect to enjoy at least two extra years of a healthy life compared with those a generation ago. More