PRESSTIME Update
Feb. 13, 2013

Macy's CEO Terry Lundgren to speak at NAA mediaXchange

"Join us at NAA mediaXchange in Orlando, April 14-17," writes NAA President and CEO Caroline Little. "Why? Because we have some terrific speakers, including Terry Lundgren, CEO of Macy's. Because we have a story to tell. Because we have tremendous work ahead of us. Because this is the best industry event to network and share stories."More

NAA files initial brief in suit to challenge postal rate deal

On behalf of member newspapers, NAA has filed its initial brief in its lawsuit against the Postal Regulatory Commission regarding that agency's August 2012 decision to approve a negotiated service agreement between the U.S. Postal Service and Valassis Direct Mail. Under the NSA, USPS granted Valassis Direct Mail discounts of 20 percent to 34 percent on new mail pieces containing advertising from national retailers of durable and semi-durable goods. Through these discounts, the U.S. Postal Service — a governmental enterprise — has given one company a price incentive to move advertising inserts out of newspapers delivered to consumers' homes. Advertising inserts comprise a critical revenue stream that supports the original reporting done by local newspapers in service to their communities.More

NAA assesses USPS proposal to end Saturday delivery

The Postal Service has announced that it will end Saturday delivery in August, but members of Congress are weighing in to say that the agency doesn't have the authority to eliminate service unilaterally. This issue is likely to be resolved through House and Senate negotiations over comprehensive postal reform legislation that will address many of the Postal Service's financial challenges: those created by Congress, such as prefunding of retiree health care costs; and others, such as declining first-class mail volume and revenues. What is the potential timing of the end of Saturday delivery?More

'The Next Journalism' will be a service that helps build community
Poynter
A new column by API Executive Director Tom Rosenstiel will look at where news media culture is heading. "The subject matter will range widely," he writes. "The search for new revenue to subsidize the mission of journalism will be part of the focus. So will experiments in how to use new technologies and platforms to gather and report news. The ethics and values that make news useful and reliable will be another topic. And a central goal will always be to understand the changing nature of how the public consumes and shares news."More

Find out how to grow and engage audiences with digital content

Clark Gilbert, president/CEO of the Deseret News and Deseret Digital Media, has succeeded in creating new business models through digital content that is distinctive from the print product. API's Transformative Content Strategies workshop, Feb. 28-March 1 in Washington, D.C., takes an in-depth look at how one of the country's most innovative media leaders is engaging audiences and driving revenue with content designed for digital platforms.More

Local branding, smart marketing propel growth at the Daily Press

The latest in NAA's series of case studies on audience growth looks at the Daily Press of Newport News, Va., which has maintained its print readership and made gains despite price increases last year. Online readership is steady, with access to digital products promoted as added value to subscribers. "We've discovered most who read the print product get their national news elsewhere, so local is our franchise," says Marisa Porto, vice president/director of content for the Daily Press Media Group. More

Ron Johnson: Here's the truth about sales at J.C. Penney
Business Insider
It has been more than a year since J.C. Penney CEO Ron Johnson unveiled his plan to turn around the struggling department store. He had originally tried to kill traditional event-driven sales at J.C. Penney and wean people off of coupons. Now, J.C. Penney is getting back into the sales game. Exactly one year after switching over to Johnson's new pricing model, J.C. Penney held a sales event for fine jewelry. So, what exactly is going on?More

For mobile marketing that really works, just look to Asia
Adweek
American marketers still have a lot of evolving to do, explains Xavier Facon, CTO of mobile ads firm Crisp Media. "What you are seeing here in the U.S. way too often is a media agency that just wants to check the mobile box and put something together badly on a short timeline," he says. "Over there, they spend six months cultivating a mobile campaign, and what comes out is truly impressive. All of our showcase campaigns come out of Asia right now."More

Twitter prepping bigger ad play
Adweek
Twitter is about to take advertising on its platform up several notches. That could mean tons more revenue for the social networking giant. But it could also threaten Twitter's delicate ad balance with its users. The company is readying its ad API to launch this quarter. That product would enable brands to run ads on the social network as easily as they do on Facebook.More

Patch misses 2012 revenue target
Street Fight
Patch missed the $40 million to $50 million revenue target set by AOL for 2012, which CEO Tim Armstrong attributed to disruption from Superstorm Sandy in the fourth quarter during an earnings call. The company remains committed to achieving run-rate profitability for the hyperlocal network by the end of 2013 — a goal being reached, in part, through continued cutbacks implemented since Armstrong first announced the projection in last year's second quarter.More

Microsoft's 'Scroogled' campaign attacks Google's Gmail ad policies
ABC News
A year ago Microsoft launched a "Scroogled" campaign attacking Google's growing Google Docs word-processing service. Now Microsoft is trying to attract users to its Outlook.com e-mail service, which it says beats Google's popular Gmail. "Google goes through every Gmail that's sent or received, looking for keywords so they can target Gmail with paid ads. And there's no way to opt out of this invasion of your privacy," Microsoft's Scroogled.com Scroogled.com site says. "Outlook.com is different — we don't go through your e-mail to sell ads," Microsoft goes on to state on that site.More

How Circa is reimagining the news story for mobile
Journalism.co.uk
Circa is a mobile-only news operation that has reimagined the news story not as an article, but as a series of key facts, pictures, maps and quotes. It calls these the "atomic elements" of a story. Users of the iPhone app, which launched in October, can follow stories, getting notifications when there is a key update.More

Zite refines its new design, backtracks from some recent changes
TechCrunch
Zite, the CNN-owned iPhone and iPad app offering aggregated content that's personalized to your interests, launched a big revamp back in December. In some ways, Zite 2.0 was a success. On the other hand, co-founder/CTO Mike Klaas and Senior Software Architect Emuye Reynolds said there was definitely some pushback from the app's fans, and Zite's star rating in the Apple App Store has dropped.More

Countdown begins for Apple iWatch
The Sydney Morning Herald
In its California headquarters, Apple is experimenting with wristwatch-like devices made of curved glass, according to people familiar with the company's explorations, who spoke on the condition that they not be named because they are not allowed to publicly discuss unreleased products. Such a watch would operate Apple's iOS platform, two people said, and stand apart from competitors based on the company's understanding of how such glass can curve around the human body.More

The New York Times goes really old school
Adweek
The National Geographic Channel is running a weeklong rotational ad unit on NYTimes.com, which will feature a custom interactive ad unit embedded with the paper's digital archive, TimesMachine. In this case the unit will feature a half-page overlay of the Times' headline from April 15, 1865, the day after Lincoln was assassinated — all to promote National Geographic's new drama, "Killing Lincoln." It will run across different areas of the site as well as on the home page later in the week.More

Four success stories and four lessons
paidContent
A new report from the Pew Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism looks at four newspapers that emerged as potential success stories from an earlier piece of research the center did called "The Search For a New Business Model." The newspapers that are profiled in the Pew report are all small to medium-sized dailies in four states: Florida, California, Utah and Tennessee. All have managed to boost their revenue over the past year using a combination of strategies — and some focused on protecting print and some focused on growing the digital side. If nothing else, the report makes it clear that the path to success can be very different from newspaper to newspaper.More

Kids app 'translates' grown-up paper into child-friendly articles
BBC News
An augmented-reality app that "translates" grown-up newspapers for children has been developed in Japan. Tokyo Shimbun, one of the country's biggest daily titles, has worked with advertising firm Dentsu to create the AR News software. It allows children to hold a smartphone over the newspaper to see a child-friendly version of the text.More

The Dallas Morning News creates revenue-generating event marketing division
INMA
At The Dallas Morning News, "circulation revenue grew significantly in 2009 and 2010, and we saw it began to level off in 2011," writes Kelly E. Christensen, senior director/marketing for DMNmedia. "We also noted that as our commercial printing and distribution customers lost circulation, revenues from this source decreased, since contracts were on a per-copy basis. So we considered what other sources of revenue we could build. One of the new businesses we focused on was event marketing, creating an event marketing division at The Dallas Morning News called CrowdSource.More

Five ways media companies can build paywalls around people instead of content
paidContent
With a few exceptions, the paywalls and subscription plans that have been erected by hundreds of newspapers and other publications over the past year share one quality — namely, they ask readers to pay a single amount for everything that is published, regardless of what those readers are interested in. What else could these publications do? Here's one suggestion: Why not monetize individual writers?More