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Clogged cell networks during big events: Examining potential solutions to a serious problem
GeekWire
After the City of Seattle asked citizens around CenturyLink Field to limit their social media use in the Stadium District last Thursday during the Seahawks opening game festivities, people weren’t too thrilled. “This is a joke, right?” one user commented on our Facebook page. “Such a high tech city, can’t even use my smartphone at the stadium,” someone noted. “So ironic at the CenturyLink Field!” wrote another. The City was concerned that too many people streaming video and uploading photos from their smartphones would clog cell networks and possibly prevent those in need from reaching emergency services.
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For emergency care, sometimes a station wagon works as well as an ambulance
Governing
When they get a call for medical help, most fire departments scramble both an ambulance and a fully-staffed fire truck. But that’s way more than many people really need, says Rick Lewis, chief of emergency medical services at South Metro Fire Rescue Authority in the Denver suburbs. “It's not the prairie and the old West anymore, where you have to be missing a limb to go to the hospital. Now it's a sore throat, or one day of cold or flu season sometimes, and that can be frustrating for people, I know it is.”
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Major League Baseball balks at foul ball safety measures
Bloomberg via Claims Journal
From his perch in the Atlanta Braves infield on May 20, third baseman Chris Johnson heard what sounded to him like the crack of two bats in quick succession. The first was a line drive off the bat of Milwaukee Brewers outfielder Carlos Gomez. The second was the ball smashing into the head of a 8-year-old in black shorts and a blue shirt, who was seated in the first row behind first base. Johnson watched as the boy’s father and a stadium first-aid crew carried him away. After the game, Johnson and catcher Gerald Laird, toting an autographed bat and ball, visited the hospital, where the boy, barely awake, was hooked up to monitors and an intravenous drip.
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Why Ivy League schools have more sex offense complaints
WNBC-TV
his fall, students at dozens of universities are returning to campuses that are under federal investigation for the way they handle sex offense complaints. Among them are some of the most prestigious Ivy League schools. Harvard, Princeton, Dartmouth and Brown are all on the U.S. Department of Education list of 68 post-secondary schools facing Title IX, the federal civil rights law that requires gender equity in public education, probes as of July. Why are such storied and grand institutions home to so many complaints about sexual misconduct?
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Training on tap for NYPD officers in wake of Eric Garner case
The Associated Press via WLNY-TV
Police Commissioner Bill Bratton says NYPD officers will get annual training on the use of force following the police custody death of Eric Garner on Staten Island. In a hearing before a City Council committee, Bratton said a pilot program will begin in November with three precincts. It will eventually expand to include 20,000 officers who regularly work patrol.
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San Antonio Fire Department to roll out program aimed at cutting down frequent 911 calls
KENS-TV
San Antonio Fire Chief Charles Hood will unveil a plan to city council to address the city's frequent 911 callers. The six-month pilot program, called Mobile Integrated Healthcare, is scheduled to begin Oct. 1. According to data provided to KENS-TV by the fire department, last year 286 callers generated 4,083 responses from SAFD emergency units. This is more responses than an average SAFD EMS unit responds to in an entire year.
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Cities find new ways to go after gun violence
Governing
In January 2013, one month after the school massacre at Newtown, Connecticut, Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter stood in a U.S. Senate briefing room, next to a display of semi-automatic rifles, and delivered a reminder to the reporters and gun control advocates gathered around him. “Too many times in the last few years,” Nutter said, “mayors have expressed shock at mass shootings. Even more frequently, many of us must cope with gun violence that occurs on the streets of our cities day after day after day after day.”
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The White House's plan to reform the war on drugs
Vox
After decades of the war on drugs and little success to show for it, the federal government is looking to change its approach. The idea, as outlined in the new plan released by the White House's Office of National Drug Control Policy, is to shift from a focus on law enforcement to more rehabilitation and addiction treatment programs.
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As lava nears homes in Hawaii, residents brace for evacuation order
Los Angeles Times
Cassandra Pensa met her husband, Clinton Barricklow, in Northern California and decided to go to Hawaii eight years ago to fulfill their dream of living off the land. They eventually moved to Ka'ohe Homesteads, a rural area where the land was affordable partly because it is near an active volcano. But a volcano can be a dangerous neighbor.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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