Texas Sheriffs Today
Jun. 14, 2013

Galveston sheriff: 30 pot plants seized in Texas City raid
The Daily News
More than 30 hydroponic marijuana plants were confiscated during a raid on a house on the city's far west side. Galveston County Sheriff's Office investigators also hauled off more than three pounds of marijuana buds that were contained in Mason jars and plastic bags.More

Harris County sheriff invited to White House
Houston Chronicle
Harris County Sheriff Adrian Garcia, the first Latino ever elected sheriff of Harris County, has had front-line experience in dealing with the nation's broken immigration system. And Garcia's experience recently garnered him an invitation to be in the audience for President Barack Obama's latest speech on immigration.More

Texas bill: Drones for no one, except the police
Salon
Both the Texas House and Senate have passed a bill that criminalizes the use of drones for surveillance. There are a few exemptions. For example, members of the media can use drones to photograph and record breaking news (although this will no doubt apply only to credentialed, mainstream press). And, of course, the police can use drones.More

Early officer receives state award for valor
Brownwood Bulletin
Early police Sgt. Steven Means received the State of Texas Law Enforcement Achievement Award for Valor in a ceremony in Austin. Means was the first officer to arrive at an RV park after Charles Conner, a resident of the park, fatally shot a man and a woman in a dispute over dogs in 2012.More

Commentary: DNA match does not always mean you have the right suspect
Slate
The U.S. Supreme Court has narrowly upheld a Maryland law allowing the state to collect DNA samples from people arrested for violent crimes and burglary. The decision vastly expands law enforcement's power to collect Americans' genetic data, to the openly expressed horror of Antonin Scalia and the other dissenters. But the problem goes deeper than that. DNA testing is not infallible. There is always a chance, no matter how slim, that an innocent person will come back as a DNA match for a crime they did not commit.More

Trusting the crosswalk button in your department
By Capt. Jeffrey Williams
Why is so much apparent anger directed toward the crosswalk button? The button will work by just pushing it once, but after repeated battering, it eventually will not work and will need to be repaired or replaced. Why don't pedestrians trust the crosswalk button? This trust can be conscious or unconscious, but pedestrians probably don't trust the crosswalk button for some of the same reasons individuals in our policing organizations don't trust their own communication conduits.More

Trusting the crosswalk button in your department
By Capt. Jeffrey Williams
Why is so much apparent anger directed toward the crosswalk button? The button will work by just pushing it once, but after repeated battering, it eventually will not work and will need to be repaired or replaced. Why don't pedestrians trust the crosswalk button?More

Oklahoma officer who helped survivors describes tornado devastation
The Edmund Sun via PoliceOne
People were trying to get into the area to find family members; victims were leaving the area in whatever manner they could — via foot, bicycles. Most cars in the heart of the affected area when the tornado hit were inoperable. More

Texas could set new standard on email privacy laws
RT
Texas could soon end up leading the U.S. in email privacy regulations if Gov. Rick Perry allows a new bill compelling law enforcement agencies to obtain a warrant prior to accessing online correspondence to become law. More

New York passes tougher police harassment laws
WIBX-TV
New legislation passed in New York's state Senate is making it a felony to harass a police officer. The bill creates the crime of aggravated harassment of a police or peace officer, and can be used when a person harasses, annoys or threatens a police officer while on duty.More

New Jersey police: 'Social media is killing us' with bomb tutorials
South Jersey Times via NJ.com
A quick Google search can reveal a lot of information. According to New Jersey police officials, a great deal of that information is helping criminals commit more crimes and build more prohibited items. "Social media is killing us," said police Chief Barry Jenkins. "People need to stop posting how to make them."More